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MISC: 2005 HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN MISC: 2005 HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN • JEFFERSON COUNTY HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN 0 January 1, 2005 0 Table of Contents CHAPTER I - Introduction and Objectives 1 • A. Introduction 1 1. Risk Analysis 1 2. Vulnerability 1 B. Authority 2 1. Federal 2 2. State 2 3. County 3 4. Local 3 C. Purpose 3 D. Scope 4 E. Mission Goals and Objectives 4 1. Goals 4 2. Objectives 4 F. Mitigating Disaster Effects 4 1. Why Mitigate? 4 2. Probability of Hazard Events 5 3. Mitigation Strategies 5 G. Ranking of Hazard Mitigation Projects 6 CHAPTER II. Planning Process and Multi-Jurisdictional Plan Adoption 7 A. Planning Process 7 • B. Plan Adoption by Local Political Subdivisions 8 CHAPTER III. Risk and Vulnerability Assessment 9 A. Risk Assessment 9 B. Assessing Vulnerability 11 CHAPTER IV. Profiling Hazard Events 29 A. Wildland Fire 29 B. Earthquake 37 C. Floods 40 D. Hazardous Materials 48 Chapter V. Mitigation Projects 52 A. Mitigation Goals and Objectives 52 Goal 1. Wildland Fires 52 Goal 2. Earthquakes 52 Goal 3. Flood 52 Goal 4. Public Alert FM Radio 52 Goal 5. Emergency Services 53 Goal 6. Education 53 B. Identifying mitigation Projects 53 • 1. Wildland Fire 53 2. Earthquake 54 -i- 3. Flood 54 5. FM Radio Alert System 54 4. Emergency Services 55 • 6. Education 55 C. Implementing Mitigation Measures 56 Chapter VI. Land Use and Future Development 57 A. Jefferson County Land Use 57 B. Analyzing Development Trends 57 Chapter VII. Plan Maintenance 59 APPENDICES APPENDIX A. Plan Adoptions API APPENDIX B. Public Meeting Documentation AP4 APPENDIX C. Acronyms AP5 APPENDIX D. Crosswalk Reference Document AP6 Tables Table 1. Hazards Identified in Jefferson County, Montana 9 Table 2. Critical Facilities 13 Table 3. Vulnerable Populations/Community Facilities 14 • Table 4. Critical Facilities: State and Federal Owned 16 Table 5. Home Values in High and Severe Risk Area 30 Maps Map 1. Jefferson Valley 17 Map 2. City of Boulder 18 Map 3. Town of Whitehall 19 Map 4. Cardwell 20 Map 5. Elk Park 21 Map 6. Basin 22 Map 7. Jefferson City 23 Map 8. Clancy 24 Map 9. Hanging Tree 25 Map 10. Montana City 26 Map 11. North Jefferson County Fuel Hazard Risk 31 Map 12. Elk Park Fuel Hazard Risk S2 Map 13. Rader Creek Fuel Hazard Risk 33 Map 14. Seasonal Wildland Fire Outlook 34 Map 15. U.S. Drought Monitor 35 Map 16. Montana Drought Conditions 36 • Map 17. Southwest Montana Earthquake Occurrence 39 Map 18. Montana Rail Link 49 -ii- Photos Photo 1. Post flood - High Ore Road 41 • Photo 2. Post flood- Cataract Creek Road at Saturday Night Hill 41 Photo 3. I-15 Boulder to Basin 42 Photo 4. Near Boulder River Bridge-West 42 Photo 5. Boulder River Bridge 43 Photo 6. Montana DOT and MDC 43 Photo 7. Aerial view of Sewer Lagoons, MDC and Boulder 44 Photo 8. Hwy 69 Elk Horn Turn Off 44 Photo 9. Lower Boulder Valley 45 Photo 10. Dunn Canyon Bridge 45 Photo 11. Nigger Hollow Bridge 46 Photo 12. I-15 Jefferson City Rest Area 46 Photo 13. Clancy Interchange 47 Photo 14. Haab Lane (Hanging Tree Road) 47 Photo 15. Propane Distribution Tank in South County 49 Photo 16. Gasoline Tanker Truck 50 Photo 17. Hazardous Farm Materials 50 Photo 18. Rail Transportation of Hazardous Materials 51 • • -iii- CHAPTER I Introduction and Objectives • A. Introduction Without a pre-disaster mitigation plan and effective implementation, the impact of a disaster, response and rebuilding becomes costly and unnecessary. This Hazard Mitigation Plan (the Plan herein) is designed to provide information and direction to Jefferson County (the County herein) and its political subdivisions for evaluating the natural and man-made hazards (for the purposes of this Plan, "hazards" herein) that present a threat to the County. The Plan also provides information for county agencies to assess the vulnerability of their assets and select the appropriate actions to mitigate the risk of these hazards. To that end the Plan outlines procedures for identification of mitigation opportunities and outlines activities designed to protect the health, safety and welfare of the citizens of Jefferson County. As such the Plan is intended to serve as a guide for those agencies and levels of government, as well as the private sector, that have the capability and resources to develop mitigation programs within their areas of responsibility. Therefore, implementation requires that a number of agencies, entities and people work together to successfully mitigate the risk of hazards and subsequent damages. 1. Risk Analysis Within this Plan, risk analysis estimates the total population and property exposed to a • hazard, and describes the characteristic of that hazard. Hazard risks can be classified in the following terms: a. Magnitude - How big or strong the event may be? b. Duration - How long will the event last? c. Distribution - Where will the events occur? d. Area Affected - How much area is affected? e. Frequency - How often the event may occur? f. Probability - The likelihood of the event occurring. 2. Vulnerability While the classification of risk indicates how, where and when events may occur, vulnerability indicates what is likely to be damaged by the identified hazards and how severely. Vulnerability is the degree of exposure to a hazard, how susceptible we are to the hazard and the losses likely to result in the event of a disaster. Assessing vulnerability is just • as important as risk assessment because it frequently provides mitigation priorities. -1- B. Authority • 1. Federal a. The Authority requiring that a hazard mitigation plan be developed for each state and/or tribe is as follows: 1) Section 322 of the Robert T Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, as amended (The Stafford Act) [Public Law 93-288, 42 USC§§5121-5204c, as amended by the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-390, October 30, 2000)]. 2) 44 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 201 and 206. Hazard Mitigation Planning and Hazard Mitigation Grant Program; Interim Final Rule 3) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Headquarters Hazard Mitigation Planning Guidance Checklist. 4) Post-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Planning Guidance for State and Local Governments-DAP-12/September, 1990 (Web Site www.fema.gov/mit/pubcmty.htm). This publication can also be ordered by calling 1-800-480-2520. • 5) Memorandums from Ernest B. Abbott, FEMA General Counsel, dated November 6, 2000, regarding"Implementation of PL 106-390 Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, (Stafford Act Amendments)." b. In addition, the federal authorities require the identification, evaluation and mitigation of significant hazardous conditions attributed to the most recent disasters. Federal responsibilities and resources for post-disaster hazard mitigation activity include; 1) FEMA Public Assistance and Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) 2) Individual and Family Grant Program 3) Executive Orders 11988 (Flood plain Management and 11990 Protection of Wetlands). 2. State . The Montana Code Annotated, Title 10, Chapter 3, Section 101 directs political subdivisions -2- within the State "...to provide for the common defense and...to preserve the lives and property of the people...." Further, this chapter of Title 10 states the state emergency management function as primarily responsible for preventing, minimizing-injury and repairing damage • from natural and man-made causes. The governor has the leadership role in providing this directive to all state agencies. After an event that qualifies for a presidential declared disaster, the declaration will direct the state to initiate the mitigation process. This response is required by Section 302 of the Stafford Act and is stated in the FEMA-State Agreement. Therefore the governor, through executive power, directs specific agencies to participate in post-disaster mitigation activities. 3. County Further,Chapter 3 of Title 10, Section 401 directs each political subdivision to prepare local disaster and emergency plans in support of the state program. Pre-disaster mitigation planning and implementation helps reduce the need for post-mitigation activity and expense. Therefore, local governments have a significant responsibility for planning and implementing effective mitigation, both before and after disaster events. For its part the county emergency management has an annual responsibility to complete a pre-disaster hazard analysis, which will identify potential problem areas. This annual analysis will also predict the county's ability to address these hazards through a capability assessment. The Jefferson County Growth Policy, which was adopted on June 18, 2003, outlines the goals and objectives that will help direct the future development of Jefferson County. Many of those goals and objectives • parallel those in this Plan. 4. Local In a post-disaster environment, locally effected areas are also expected to participate in the mitigation evaluation. Local government participation with federal and state agencies in the Montana Hazard Mitigation Team(MT-SHMT) process is crucial. Recommendations on alleviating or eliminating a repetitive problem often focus on local assessment as to the causes of damage and depend on local implementation. 44 CFR 201.6 requires that the local pre- disaster hazard mitigation plan be formally adopted by the political subdivisions requesting approval of the Plan. C. Purpose In addition to fulfilling the legal obligation under the Stafford Act, as amended, this pre- disaster mitigation plan serves the following purposes: 1. Recognize and describe the potential hazards and impact upon the county. 2. Identify authorities, capabilities and shortfalls, and assign responsibilities to: • a. Develop programs, activities, strategies and recommendations for -3- mitigation, b. Monitor and implement pre-disaster and post-disaster mitigation measures, and • c. List the County's mitigation strategies. 3. Identify and establish mitigation goals, objectives and priorities. D. Scope The scope of this Plan is countywide. Actions and recommendations are not restricted to those localities designated as disaster areas. Impact of natural conditions in one part of the County will often have a similar effect upon another. This Plan provides mitigation strategies, goals, objectives and priorities, which can serve to strengthen and improve the effectiveness of county operational procedures. E. Mission Goals and Objectives The mission goals and objectives of this Plan are to create a disaster resistant county by reducing the threat of natural or man-made hazards to life and property. At the same time they develop emergency response capabilities, economic stability and security of the critical county infrastructure,while encouraging the protection and restoration of natural resources and the environment. A sound planning process is essential to the development of an effective mitigation plan. • 1. Goals Thus, the goals include: a. Describe and evaluate vulnerability of hazards, b. Motivate the public, private sector and government agencies to mitigate against the effects of hazards through information and education, c. Coordinate and establish priorities for hazard mitigation programs and activities at all levels, and d. Document and evaluate successful progress in achieving hazard mitigation 2. Objectives The Plan itself has two objectives a. to guide a mitigation program to reduce or eliminate destructive effects of significant hazards, and b. to serve as a public and private sector reference document and management tool for mitigation activities F. Mitigating Disaster Effects • 1. Why Mitigate? -4- Emergency management deals with the cycle of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. All too often mitigation is considered as a post-disaster activity. Damages occur, • recovery takes place, and then questions arise as to why it happened and what can be done to correct the problem. The amount of money spent on all phases of emergency management increased steadily through the 90s. Pre-disaster hazard mitigation actions are intended to eliminate or lessen the impact of a catastrophic event upon life and property. The requirement to develop a post-disaster hazard mitigation plan provides an opportunity for communities to develop strategies for reduction of potential losses from recurring natural disasters. Whether applied in post-disaster reconstruction or during pre-disaster planning efforts, hazard mitigation provides planners with guidelines for reducing losses from future disaster. 2. Probability of Hazard Events Natural events such as floods, tornadoes, droughts, winter storms, earthquake and wildfires are considered inevitable subject to climate and geophysical conditions. Hazards associated with these potential disaster-producing events become evident when a risk factor is applied. Natural hazards such as flooding or tornadoes hold little threat to life or property in a sparsely populated environment. The risk of an event causing significant damage or destruction increases significantly with changing land use patterns including commercial and residential development. While the County cannot control the occurrence of hazard events, it can directly influence the severity of impact by initiating pre-disaster long-term hazard mitigation planning, principles and practices. This can be accomplished by taking action to "break" the • repetitive cycle of damage, reconstruction and recurrence of damages to the same locality or facility. However, the county recognizes it is not always easy to predict the location or amount of impact a disaster may have, but by investing now, lives and money will be saved in the years to come. 3. Mitigation Strategies Mitigation actions are most often considered as taking the form of structural or non-structural measures. Implementation of mitigation actions can take either type of measure or a combination thereof. There are primarily four basic approaches to mitigation: a. Altering the Hazard- Modifying the hazard to eliminate or reduce the frequency of its occurrence. Examples are the triggering avalanches under controlled conditions or clearing woody debris from around buildings (fuel reduction) as a viable means of slowing or preventing the spread of devastating wildland fires. b. Averting the Hazard -Redirecting the impact away from a vulnerable location by using structural devices or land treatment to shield people and development from harm. Dikes, levees and dams all represent physical efforts implemented to keep the risk away from the people and structures. c. Adapting to the Hazard- Modifying structures and altering design • standards of construction. Identified problems such as threats from high wind, earthquake, and sliding or subsidence, and heavily forested terrain -5- all require special building standards and construction practices in order to reduce vulnerability to damage. d. Avoiding the Hazard-Keep people away from the hazard area or limiting • development and population expansion in a risk area. Enforcement actions such as regulations,building codes and ordinances are intended to restrict, limit or deny access to specially identified risk areas. G. Ranking of Hazard Mitigation Projects It is necessary to prioritize and rank a range of hazard mitigation projects in order to qualify for funding to assist with the costs associated with such projects. The ranking from the highest priority will be in accordance with the State Administrative Plan and 44 CFR 206.435 guidance, as follows: 1. Measures that best fit within an overall plan for development and/or hazard mitigation in the community or disaster area. 2. Measures that if not taken,will have an adverse impact on the area, such as potential loss of life, loss of essential services, damage to essential facilities or economic hardship on the community. 3. Measures that have the greatest potential impact for reducing future disaster losses. 4. Measures that are designed to accomplish multiple objectives or multi-purpose projects versus single purpose projects, including damage reduction, environmental enhancement and economic recovery. • -6- CHAPTER II Planning Process and Multi-Jurisdictional Plan Adoption • A. Planning Process This multi-hazard type mitigation plan represents the efforts of the Jefferson County Disaster and Emergency Services (DES) in concert with the Jefferson County Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC); the towns of Whitehall and Boulder, their officials and representatives; the Montana State Hazard Mitigation Officer, who provided significant guidance and support in all aspects of plan development; and an open public involvement process pursuant to 44 CFR §§201.6(b) and (c). Prior to the development of this Plan, in August 2002 and 2004, respectively, the Jefferson County DES Coordinator and LEPC reviewer attended the Montana Predisaster Mitigation Planning Workshop for Local Governments. Prior to and during development of the plan the DES Coordinator and LEPC reviewer worked closely with the Montana state hazard mitigation officer. Notice of planning meetings were published in the local newspapers; Boulder Monitor, Jefferson County Courier and Whitehall Ledger. (Appendix B) Business owners, current and former County leaders, school officials and many other individuals were encouraged to attend by personal letter and e-mail invitation of the County Disaster and Emergency Services • Coordinator. Other agencies such as the US Forest Service, Montana Developmental Center, Montana Department of Transportation, and Riverside Corrections were also invited to comment and provide input. (Appendix B) In January 2003 public meetings were held in Whitehall, Boulder, and Clancy, the major population areas of the County,for citizen and agency participation to determine hazard risk and vulnerability and to identify projects for mitigation. (Appendix B, Sign-in Sheets) Many elected officials, city, county and emergency services representatives, and members of the local communities attended the various public meetings, participated in the planning process and contributed significantly to the Plan's development. (Appendix B,Sign-in Sheets) Further, information gathered from the history of the County as well as from the public meetings has served as a guide for this document. A final public meeting will be advertised to solicit comments on the draft plan. This draft will be distributed to the LEPC, the County Commission, the County political subdivisions, and other agencies. It will also be posted on the County website,and will be available at the libraries in Whitehall, Boulder and Clancy for public review. • -7- B. Plan Adoption by Local Political Subdivisions This Plan has been adopted by the local jurisdictions pursuant to 44 CFR 201.6(c)(5). The • resolutions as signed by the Jefferson County Commission and the Councils of the Town of Whitehall and City of Boulder are attached hereto in Appendix A. • -8- CHAPTER III Risk and Vulnerability Assessment • A. Risk Assessment A risk assessment has been conducted to address the requirements of The Stafford Act by evaluating the risk to the community of the highest priority hazards. The Stafford act requires detailing the potential losses to critical facilities;federal, state, and private, and residential and business property resulting from natural hazards by assessing the vulnerability to such hazards. This plan also evaluates the risks presented by man-made hazards. The goal of the risk assessment process was to determine which hazards presented the highest risk and had the greatest concern of the community citizens and what areas are the most vulnerable to hazards. Further, the analysis considered those hazards that had historically caused the most problems. Cumulatively, these considerations focused the plan on the four hazards most likely to occur and generate to the greatest damage. The public meetings played a big role in this analysis as it allowed the citizens of the community to brainstorm the various hazards and rank their concerns. Jefferson County is a large diverse area with mountains, plains,forests and grassland. There are two (2) incorporated communities (Maps 2 & 3, pp 18 & 19),four (4) unincorporated communities (Maps 4, 6 - 8, pp 20, 22-24),and a large number of subdivisions within the County. • The 2002 census lists the population of Jefferson County at 10,049 people residing in an area of 1,658.9 square miles. It is not likely that any single isolated incident would result in a high loss of life. The impact of a large wildfire in any of the identified high-risk areas would result in varying degrees of personal property damage. The effect of a large earthquake would cause a greater impact on the infrastructure in the County than injury or loss of life, and would possibly account for greater property damage. Many hazards have been identified in Jefferson County that pose a threat to the community. Those hazards were identified and profiled by several different means. A history of past events was gathered and recognized through Internet research, available GIS data, public meetings, county records and old newspapers. As well, input was collected at the public meetings from individuals voicing their opinions and concerns. Thus, the possible future events could be predicted and ranked according to the probability of occurrence. In this manner, the top three identified for mitigation projects were Earthquake, Flood, and Wildfire. The hazards (in alphabetical order)have been identified in Table 1, as follows: Table I Hazards Identified in Jefferson County,Montana Hazard How Identified Why Identified Aviation Newspaper articles Small incidents in the past.,but Flt Path- • Recent History Salt Lake to Helena,and Bozeman to Butte for Delta and Frontier Airlines overlays -9- Hazard How Identified Why Identified Civil Disorder:Terrorism Bomb Threats Jefferson High School Past Incidents • Dam Failure Department of Natural Resources and Potential loss of life down stream Conservation Jefferson County DES DES office has plans for five area dams, Dam Emergency Action Plans some outside of the County Disease: Animal Montana Department of Livestock Importance of livestock health to the local Department of Fish,Wildlife and economy. Parks Human New emerging diseases such as SARS and Centers for Disease Control West Nile Virus Potential for disease spread as a terrorist incident Drought National Interagency Coordination Frequent historical and ongoing drought Center events. National Resources Conservation Service Importance of agriculture to the local Water Management Bureau economy Natural Resource Information System Relationship to wildfire danger Earthquake Montana Bureau of Geology and Numerous faults within the County Mines website History of nearby earthquakes of greater USGS National Seismic Hazard than 6.0 magnitude • Mapping Community growth since last large Project website earthquakes Related to potential hazardous material incidents Flood FEMA Flood Hazard Mapping Several creeks and streams run through the Program County including the Boulder River and Flood Plain management studies Jefferson River History Past incidences HAZMAT Jefferson County DES Two Interstate highways and one Input from planning/public meetings secondary highway cross Jefferson County and there are undetermined amounts of Hazardous Materials at any time Utility Interruption: History Previous Events-fire related,storm related Electricity and animal caused History Previous Event-Semi truck crash into Natural Gas Natural Gas pump house Thunderstorm Newspaper articles;SHELDUS,USC Aug 1891 6"hail near Radersburg Hazards Research Lab June 1938 All crop damaged in Lower Boulder Valley July 1939 Damaged crops from 3 miles N to 12 Miles S of Boulder • September 1983 Property and Crop damage -10- Hazard How Identified Why Identified Transportation:Interstate, Citizen interviews,newspaper Road closures due to floods and to winter State,County/City roads articles storms • Urban Fire Newspaper articles Past historical events Volcano Mount St.Helen 1980 eruption in western Washington State State DES Website caused vehicle damage and affected those USGS with respiratory diseases in this County Several inactive volcanoes in the County Wildland Fire National Interagency Coordination Past and recent experiences in all areas of a. urban interface Center the County. b.public land Natural Resources Conservation c.private land Service Natural Resource Information System Helena National Forest Input from planning/public meetings Wind Input from public meetings Multiple incidents,particularly between SHELDUS,USC Hazards Research 1990 and present. Lab Newspaper articles Recent history of road closures due to Input from planning/public meetings winter conditions. Winter Storm Western Regional Climate Center Potential for power outages during a cold spell. Feb.1933,200 people marooned in Boulder during temps-30 to-60 B. Assessing Vulnerability In order to adequately profile the potential for property damage and loss of life in the event of a major incident, the same County demographics and statistics as used to assess risk and the subsequent additional information have been taken into consideration. The City of Boulder is a community of 1352 people that lies at the northern end of the Boulder Valley near the center of the County. The terrain is a wide-open space surrounded by the Deer Lodge National Forest. Farming and ranching families occupy the open spaces to the east and south. Boulder,being the county seat,houses local government offices and is the home to two State residential institutions. The area East and West of Boulder from Basin to Clancy along the Boulder River presents a situation for floods unique in the County. (See Photos 1 to 14) This area has been repaired and "rip-rap" installed to minimize future flood events. Also, the Wildland/Urban interface in this area presents a wildland fire hazard unique in the County. The Town of Whitehall, population 1092, located at the far south end of the County is a community also in a wide-open area. Whitehall businesses provide a very diverse number of services to the surrounding agricultural industry. There are also a number of senior care residences and a treatment center for patients recovering from traumatic brain injuries. The • railroad spur through Whitehall presents a unique situation for HAZMAT incidents, however, this spur is currently utilized only for transportation railroad ballast materials and rarely coal products. -11- The unincorporated areas of the County include many citizens who reside in outlying areas, and who require a number of services and numerous important critical infrastructures. • Structure losses have been estimated using various data sets and various types of hazard areas, such as a wildland fire interface. Whenever possible, the hazard area is overlaid on the structure data to determine the number of structures that lie within that area. The values of those structures were then calculated using FEMA replacement values. In most cases, the dollar values are multiplied by a damage factor since many events will not result in a complete loss and may have only minor damage. These figures, of course, will only represent estimates but are based on current hazard data. No public infrastructure buildings have been identified as being in wildland fire areas and very few in any flood area. They would, however,be a major consideration in the event of a strong earthquake. Losses in the case of wildland fire will be primarily private residences. Critical facilities were also analyzed individually based on the hazard information available. Whenever possible, losses were based on the Insurance Appraisal reports or local resources. Others were estimated on factors listed in the FEMA How-to Guide, Understanding Your Risks: Identifying Hazards and Estimating Losses (FEMA 386-2). The population impacts were assessed based on the percentage of the population estimated to have residences in the hazard area and the general warning time anticipated. The loss of life and possible injuries are difficult to determine and would depend significantly on the time of day or year. • Within the County there are several areas that draw tourists. The largest of these is the Lewis and Clark Caverns State Park located east of Whitehall. The ghost town of Elk Horn draws many visitors and has become the year round residence for a small number of citizens. Campground areas on National Forest land are occupied from early spring until the hunting season closes in the fall. All of these are located in timbered areas and have been affected by wildland fires in the past. An important piece of accessing the vulnerability of the community to the identified hazards is to determine what assets may be more vulnerable to those hazards than others. Those facilities that are considered vital to the community such as law enforcement, fire services, health services and other government services have been identified as critical facilities. (Tables 2-4, pp 13-16). Facilities, housing particularly vulnerable populations such as nursing homes for the elderly, schools,jails and shelters are also considered to be critical facilities. The Disaster and Emergency Services Coordinator and additional research through the planning process have identified these facilities. The Critical facilities can be found on Maps 2-10, pp 18-26. The critical facilities owned privately or by the local government are also outlined in more detail in Table 2 in terms of their values. The critical facilities owned by the State of Montana and the Federal government are also listed in Table 4 • -12- Table 2 Critical Facilities • Name Address Size(sq. Replacement Sources of Information ft.) Value($) Jefferson County 101 Centennial 15,688 2,118,415 Jefferson County Insurance Courthouse Boulder Appraisal Reports Jefferson County Law&Justice 110 S Washington 21,290 2,194,585 Jefferson County Insurance Center Boulder Appraisal (Law enforcement offices,Justice Court,Jail,Emergency Operations Center) Jefferson County Courthouse 101 Centennial 6,014 309,839 Jefferson County Insurance Annex(1) Boulder Appraisal Jefferson County Courthouse 114 Washington 2,212 79,968 Jefferson County Insurance Annex(2) Boulder Appraisal Boulder Fire Station 207 W 2nd 2112 140,000 Boulder Insurance Appraisal Boulder Bull Mountain Fire Station 1 3755 Hwy 69 2000 $100,000 Bull Mountain Fire Trustee Boulder Bull Mountain Fire Station 2 2274 Hwy.69 1100 $50,000 Bull Mountain Fire Trustee Boulder Basin Fire Station 94 Basin St 1500 $80,000 Basin Fire Trustee President Basin • Clancy Fire Station 1 1 Railroad Way 2400 140,000 Clancy Fire Chief Clancy Clancy Fire Station 2 Haab Lane 1764 75,000 Clancy Fire Chief Clancy Jefferson City Fire Station 21 Spring St pending pending Jefferson City Elk Park Fire Station 570 E Elk Park Rd 2400 150,000(total) Elk Park Fire Department (2 buildings) Elk Park(Butte) 1600 Montana City Fire Station 1 113 Mission Mountain 4000 250,000 Montana City Fire Chief Rd. Mt City(Clancy) Montana City Fire Station 2 43 Jackson Creek Rd, 2000 100,000 Montana City Fire Chief Mt.City(Clancy) Whitehall Fire Station 200 W Legion 9000 300,000 Whitehall Fire Chief Whitehall Boulder Ambulance Building 205 W 2nd Boulder 1228 81,000 Boulder Insurance Appraisal Elkhorn Search and Rescue 4 Railroad Way Clancy 2280 150,000 ESAR Members Building Whitehall Water Towers West of Whitehall St 150,000(2) Visual,estimate West of Paul's Gulch Rd • Boulder Water Towers East of Main St Visual,estimate -13- Name Address Size(sq. Replacement Sources of Information ft.) Value($) Jefferson County Transfer Stations Cataract Creek 5,000 Original Cost • -Basin Jefferson City Jefferson&Spring 100,000 Original Cost Clancy Shady Lane 125,000 Original Cost Montana City Wildish Lane 150,000 Cost plus inflation Whitehall Paul's Gulch 150,000 Cost plus inflation Boulder N.Little Boulder Road 150,000 Cost plus inflation Whitehall Town Hall 2 N Whitehall St 3972 225,661 Whitehall Insurance Appraisal Whitehall Boulder City Hall 304 N Main Boulder 1680 60,000 Boulder Insurance Appraisal Whitehall Public Works Shop 512 1st E Whitehall 1512 78,453 Whitehall Insurance Appraisal Whitehall Public Works Shop 201 E Legion 3420 118,825 Whitehall Insurance Appraisal Whitehall Boulder Public Works Shop 301 N Madison 3500 215,000 Boulder Insurance Appraisal Boulder Jefferson County Public Works T9N,R3W,S35 3600 111,675 Jefferson County Insurance Shops Montana City Appraisal Whitehall 100 Lucille Whitehall 1755 50,789 Jefferson County Insurance Appraisal • Boulder 100 Odyssey Ln 5252 314,520 Jefferson County Insurance Boulder Appraisal Whitehall Airport 4,500x72 Boulder Airport 3,675 x 72 Delmo Lake Dam Big Pipestone Ck,West N/A N/A Pipestone Water Users Assn.- of Whitehall Owner Alternative Youth Adventures 105 Venture Way Land- County Owned Building Boulder -JLDC Table 3 Vulnerable Populations and Other Community Facilities Name Address Size(sq. Replacement Sources of Information ft.) Value($) Cardwell School Cardwell 7,538 775,000 County Superintendent of Schools Clancy School 6 N Main 64,000 5,760,000 Jefferson County Insurance Clancy 4,608 480,000 Appraisal 1,920 144,000 7,800 191,000 Boulder Elementary 205 S Washington 40,000 School District Clerk Boulder • Jefferson High School 312 S Main 70,334 Boulder 3,000 44- Name Address Size a(sq. Replacement Sources of Information Value($) Basin School 30 Quartz 6768 • Basin Whitehall Middle School 110 N Main Whitehall 48,460 5,149,000. Whitehall School Insurance Appraisal Whitehall Elementary and old 110 N Main 30,947 1,114,000. Whitehall School Insurance gym Whitehall Appraisal Whitehall High School and 110 N Main 44,462 1,206,000. Whitehall School Insurance industrial arts complex Whitehall Appraisal Montana City School Crystal Creek Road 67,700 5,574.461 S Montana City School Insurance Clancy 745,264 C Appraisal Boulder-Basin Senior Citizens 201 S Main Center Boulder Whitehall Senior Citizens Center 3 N Division 2400 150,000 Jefferson County Insurance Whitehall Appraisal Jefferson Valley Museum, 303 S Division 4500 165,000 Jefferson County Insurance (two buildings) Whitehall 1800 45,000 Appraisal Jefferson County Fair Grounds 1 Fairground Road 364,5000 Jefferson County Insurance Boulder Appraisal Boulder Medical Clinic/Jefferson 214 S Main Private Ownership County Public Health Office Boulder • Whitehall Medical Clinic 108 1st St W 2500 250,000 Owners Insured valve Whitehall Boulder Community Library 202 S Main 2150 150,671 Jefferson County Insurance Boulder Appraisal John Gregory Memorial Library 110 W 1st St 1408 158,217 Whitehall Insurance Appraisal Whitehall Evergreen Clancy Health& 474 Hwy.282 Private Ownership Rehabilitation Center Clancy Quality Life LLC 12 Bessler Rd. Private Ownership Montana City The Homestead Place 39 Microwave Hill Rd. Private Ownership Montana City Golden Garden LLC 113 3sd W 3,800 350,000 Bank Appraisal Whitehall Meadow Lark Manor 35 Skyline Dr. 8,000 750,000 Bank Appraisal Whitehall 1 • -15- Table 4 Critical Facilities:State and Federal Owned • Name Address Ownership Park Lake Dam T8N,R5W,S13 State of Montana Department of Transportation Bernice State of Montana Buildings - Bernice - Boulder Boulder State of Montana - Whitehall Whitehall East State of Montana - Whitehall Whitehall West State of Montana 580 W Hwy 2,Whitehall Montana Developmental Center Boulder State of Montana Riverside Corrections Boulder State of Montana Lewis&Clark Caverns East of Whitehall State of Mont US Postal Service - Whitehall 15 N Main,Whitehall Federal - Cardwell Cardwell Federal - Basin 100 Basin St,Basin Federal - Boulder 126 S Main,Boulder Federal - Jefferson City Jefferson City Federal - Clancy 1 N Main,Clancy Federal • Rural Development 3 Whitetail Road Federal Forest Service Ranger Station Whitehall Natural Resources Farm Services • -16- The following maps of Jefferson County Communities provide the location of critical facilities, public and private buildings, and county infrastructure: IIP Jefferson Valley r^° to xy yy 9 1z.1 Yt-ca- s , s' 3asi4 1;d:8lii-*a1\an' 'Too. 1.. ._ “1-7Fa r I ,i,fE;:s t, ro##kSL,, a✓ V, tei ayl.5- a��Y 3 way} ? '.----,--X.I.il i i % ( i t.,..,, • „u,L,...._„,%vir Itovk E6:13:1t2cul 3 t:xrr R4 8 a,ek-ua UI - 6 Map 1 • -17- City of Boulder 0 L � 9 Stsµ J *$s I ' T� i I i d L 1• , fir s € t ? "mow.,,+:E e 7,;7;',-.‘,„.,,,I .+ A - ,'.' will, v e : ',--r'''' ',4'--',',-,41.. , ,,,,4• "'-'-‘4,- ''''''/IIinolt:'".' ''.--.,-,,, i ' ?S _.,,j r • „ , pgpg� q�,y�F £� . ,,,,, 4 ,A. , 14 t. • i "5,a 1 ,, o, ; ;. meaty ff ox4 ' .8 rn sc s, . . Legend 1. Water towers 13. DOT Shop 2. City Hall 14. Bull Mountain Fire#1 3. City Shop 15. Senior Citizens 4. Post Office 16. Grade School 5. Library 17. Courthouse 6. Medical Clinic/Public Health 18. Courthouse Annex#1 7. High School 19. Courthouse Annex#2 8. MDC 20. Law&Justice Center-Jail-EOC 9. AYA 21. Fire Hall 10. Riverside Corrections 22. Ambulance 11. Fairgrounds 11 12. County Shop Map 2 -18- ! Town of Whitehall i. itkiVM __ fy ++�q•p C2N Vd3 �. � •+s�':�v.- -.-'rte..._,-\\ I 11,(1%, ,4, °+. yam j o-att 41 Fix.l \\ 4n m., t > y i - Y�'II `i.if Pf"o� \L `n`I I:„._, _r._ _.„...,--,...,,...,,,_. ..., .. ,::.: r r F s 1_,,,.----'–` 44)-4.3._ _.--'"-- ,` rte t a) I • --,"'`- ' '' - i.,--2i. I ..- 1 p f oiPFO4'Y 4 i - L��� ,It : J F ,y ,t1 Pr:I it..' i — Legend: 1. Transfer Station 10. Fire Hall 2. Water Towers(3) 11. Town Hall-Jail-Ambulance Garage 3. High School 12. Library 4. Grade School 13. Clinic 5. Senior Citizen Center 14. Post Office 6. Town Shop 15. Golden Garden Assisted Living 7. County Extension 16. Meadow Lark Manor Assisted Living 8. County Shop 17. Airport 9. Museum 18. Brain Injury Treatment Map 3 0 -19- Cardwell 0 6. 2 Y2 ---- ; ., - ------- -_,_1,..c ___------------ # r (fl rd tip 41 i to • L:C&V,S,g41-.'"'l \ U' Apr-rox. 1.6 rail s acr". Legend: 1. Post Office Map 4 410 -20- Elk Park 41) ii 4110 -lax. 1.6 miles acroas. Legend: 1. Fire Hall Map 5 -21- Basin • 1 Legend: 1. Post Office 2. Fire Hall 3. Grade School 4. Transfer Station Map 6 -22- Jefferson City • t 1 • rox. 4 mires across. Legend: 1. Transfer Station 2. Fire Hall 3. Post Office • Map 7 -23- Clancy ° ` pp ¢p pp *ti 9 • 2 f�f , ox , 4 miler across. Legend: 1. Search& Rescue 2. Fire Station#1 3. Grade School 4. Museum 5. Post Office 6. Evergreen Nursing Home Map 8 -24- Hanging Tree . . , i ? , I - .N145).01 allt.1 cif"I, (1 15incv ' , , '• '•---5' --', - - .'''''''''.,, '..-.:: ... 1', -,. :- .- ,, .55'-. .._. .,,._,' ::,-9-40ii?:::',;-•-('';‘'.'":-'.:, "';'*--i''' ,t,' • 4 r1-1 iles Legend: 1. Clancy Fire Station#2 S Map 9 -25- Montana City ,,,,, ,,,‘„„,,,,. ,,,,,, ,, IIIi,— ...,. ,.. � s d„,,,,,,,,,,,„,,,,„3,,,,,is , ,,„„, , ,, ,, . yj i .isle , € £ , ''�'� i ' ...._ N F t; ' ygasbn.. g 1 ”, 3 I . Nitittititt.ad_ ttti 1 t 1i II f i • it ('tLirrc, I App Fox. 4 rriHesacross. I Legend: 1. Fire Station#2 2. Grade School 3. Quality Life Assisted Living 4. The Homestead Place Assisted Living 5. Transfer Station 6. County Shop 7. Fire Station#1 SMap 10 -26- In terms of the County infrastructure, information outlining specific private infrastructures was not requested. Northwestern Energy and Vigilante Electric operate electric transmission lines and Quest controls telephone lines within the County. A large cross-country electrical • transmission line to the West Coast transits the county from the Broadwater County/Jefferson County line to the Jefferson County/Powell County line. Several cellular telephone towers owned by various entities are also located throughout the County. The County has a limited system of natural gas lines; therefore, many residents rely on propane for heat. Public water and sewer services exist in Boulder, Basin and Whitehall, but many subdivisions operate their own water systems. The interstate highway system includes both Interstate -15 (I-15) and I-90, which are in generally good condition or in the process of being resurfaced. The state roads are paved and in good condition. Most of the City of Boulder and Town of Whitehall streets are paved. Nearly 200 miles of county maintained roads are both black top and gravel in fair condition. There are many bridges in the County maintained by the various jurisdictions. In addition to the critical facilities, residences; businesses and other facilities are also vulnerable to these hazards. The population of Jefferson County is 10,499 with 4167 housing units. The median value of owner occupied housing units is $128,700. There are 209 private, non-farm establishments with paid employees, and an additional 850 non-employer establishments. These statistics are derived from Annual Estimates of Housing Units for Counties in Montana:April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2003 (HU-EST-2003-04-30), 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau. • The recent experiences of fires and floods in Jefferson County demonstrate that the greatest asset within this County are the residents themselves as the outpouring of assistance from them, before and during an emergency, provides even an additional level of security. The Jefferson County Sheriffs department is staffed with highly trained and motivated officers who make response and assistance available in all areas of the County. The 911 Center and the detention center are both housed in the Sheriffs office. There is a Sheriffs Reserve Corp of volunteers who fill in during scheduled events and emergencies as shifts are short staffed. Two volunteer Search and Rescue Units are also under the Sheriff, These volunteers are trained and equipped to assist in a variety of incidents when called. The individuals in these two groups provide most of their own equipment as there is currently little financial support from the general fund. In addition, Boulder and Whitehall each maintain a Police Department. The County has volunteer fire departments in each population area. These fire departments range from very well equipped and trained, to those that need more equipment and training. There are three ambulance services and two quick response medical units in the County. One of the ambulance services is private and the other two are operate by the incorporated communities of Boulder and Whitehall. The quick response units are volunteers, but receive some funding from the County to purchase equipment and supplies. Primarily,these • volunteer ambulance services are funded by billing for services. Yet, Homeland Security Department funding is becoming available to help equip and train the individuals of the quick -27- response units. This funding is primarily aimed at incidents involving terrorism, except the equipment will be available for all hazards. • There are also small clinics in Boulder and in Whitehall. However, general hospital services are located outside the County borders. Because the growing population of Jefferson County consists of individuals coming from areas where fire and emergency medical response are provided, it is an education and recruiting challenge to maintain the necessary volunteers. The number of hours required to obtain and maintain the necessary level of training makes it even more difficult. Consequently, fire departments and emergency medical services are in dire need of volunteers, and this will be addressed as a project in this Plan. Additional assets include the County and state road departments and state and federal agencies with personnel or stations located within the county including, US Forest Service, Fish, Wildlife &Parks, and Montana Highway Patrol. • • -28- CHAPTER IV Profiling Hazard Events • For the purposes of preparing the Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan for Jefferson County the following four events,out of the sixteen potential hazard events identified in Chapter 3, are determined the most likely to occur and have the greatest effect on the county: wildland fire, earthquake, flood and a hazardous materials incident. At the public meetings attending county and town officials and representatives, emergency personnel and community citizens prioritized the hazards by determining which had caused prior fatalities, resulted in property damage and economic hardship, and had the greatest potential to cause such in the future. A. Wildland Fire The current drought is a major contributor to the wildland fire potential. The Tri-County Fire Working Group has mapped north Jefferson County, the Elk Park and Rader Creek areas in south Jefferson County to show severe and high fuel hazard areas (Maps 11-13, pp 31-33). There are more than 50 major and minor subdivisions within the project area. Access to some of the older sub-divisions is restricted by single ingress/egress roads constructed with the original developments. Although, some of subdivisions have identified water sources, there is not enough to provide any real defense in the event of a wildland fire. The fire fuel hazard mapping has not been completed, but provides enough information to get started with this Plan. Areas not yet mapped include the community of Basin, many • subdivisions and residences along county roads areas, and the ghost town of Elk Horn that are in severe to high areas. Wildland fire mitigation will be a huge task for Jefferson County. Headwaters RC&D is in the process of hiring contractors to write new County Fire Plans for counties in South West Montana including Jefferson County. As soon as the new Fire Plan is completed it will be annexed to this Plan. The structures in Jefferson County most vulnerable to wildland fire are private residences. The residences identified in this sampling are located in the severe and high-risk fuel hazard areas that have been mapped by the Tri-County Fire Working Group. Home values in the severe and high risk areas were based on actual construction using an estimated average square footage and the FEMA How-to Guide, Understanding Your Risks: Identifying Hazards and Estimating Losses (FEMA 386-2) for valuation of$77 per square for single family dwellings and $52 per square foot for mobile homes. The contents replacement valuation is placed at 50% of the residential building value. • -29- 0 Table 5 Home Values in High and Severe Risk Areas Location Res. Average Square Replacement Cost Footage Structure Contents South Hills/Cross Fire 41 4000 @$77 $308,000 $154,000 /Pronghorn Hills Areas Hills Brothers area 11 3000 @ $77 $231,000 $115,500 Saddle Mountain 135 2700 Q$77 $207,900 $103,950 Blue Sky Heights/Forest 2500 @$77 $192,500 $ 96,250 Park Estates Gruber Estates 65 3500 Q$77 $269,500 $134,750 Halford/Liverpool/Ohil 31 2700 @$77 $207,900 $103,950 40 Gulch/Rocky Mountain- Lump Gulch Finn Gulch 17 1300 Q$52 $70,200 $45,100 Upper and Lower Rader 99 1700 Q$69 $117,000 $58,500 Creek • -30- North Jefferson County Fuel Hazard Risk ge .Y ... 0 may, r _. J w� gym y...rs 1..,,sliltits ill yy /01 * 1 ii. - .„ S . car s i Yt , i s 1... 0 Map 11 -31- • • • Jefferson County Fire Risk Areas 8W 7W 6W 5W 4W 3W 2W 1W ,` 1 -I ; . - - .'., ' : ,,,,,.... - ',,,.. ,:',.--..:'......;.41,;',23filiiitilikaii9s,641t.'ritl.,.::':....:.::::::.:1. : : : ,.,., : ' ' ' ' yaw fri 4 3 i � • x , a 1. -a as 4' ; '1, : NJ g.., ,....,,,„.,,...„.. . x .\ � °„ ( y w N rag,.- W., rw; r■ cn t 2N 4 a) N r.) 0 0 0 ki err rs o n (iounty Fire Risk Areas 8W 7W 6W 5W 4W 3W 2W 1W ..\ . . . .. , , .„........,i A „c ,.•,,, PZ / • ' • , i , ' = i i• I ' ' $:16 l' - ' ' ' ' ' / •/ 04t'''. ,,, rorl)ro i ) ;,,••°°' ' ' • )"t ,-,,,,, 4, ir , , ,, -'1,-: --,,, ,,•;-,,,,-; ' --• ',---...., ' ....„.....,7 ' ,, / [-- ...4. • • , - , .. 1-t ,, k, '4' ' k•, ■k* 10 e .,, ', , , 4,o - :--4, :., , ,— ------- ---/ -*- :e' ''''‘. 'i,,,,"'1,' ' . * ", ' ,1•• ' '• • ' UM"' ,,, -:- - ' I ,,,,,,. 'ifli (-0 4. 4. 4 ' ' ' — .n,..,. 3 , • ., --- 4 \ SI ," • • t.- — % • v , )—i• \. ,- s" 3 , iw Jefferson County-Fire Risk& Districts Map for getiefa reference only Fver6k-off*co-lcct sN FieAist00-1105-bsty,i &iv,-P.m f' Map prepare 4y fnforrnation ie 1 icgy Dept ,.,A 4 , ro mrtinto cti k,,c1,,Fn Lit Pst Rkr4.r,e -sate'C40527 i,,-mt-No t:A Cwq Rt..$.,1,1,',e Aso , , L'411624i1Vaior J A 4 .„,-,4„, si„, d • Tiii C'440" (fri,..10,1 c 0 R jr,4 sr, „WftIon ft.ws.-',`Al 1-0 .■k ci.) • • • Seasonal Wildl nd Fire Outlook 4---- ebruarAugust 2004 Z. / 't..___......,_..,, e 0 --)c) ___-,--t --- i 7 _., .,- ,'- -----___,...______„__ , , Hh________ . 1Y, �_ 1.W 1. ` I i y rD 4 t 7� O F,e„t w+ ..v:�., <----- O - US Seasonat Fire Potential Above Normai Potently ° r---1 Below Normal Potential 4 ittp:/'/w w nifc.guvl news'caseI re i r e_far s' _ nal-r ratiook ip , 5/2:1 iaJ N U.S. Drought Monitor III ektle f be Drought Monitor maps is Tuesday on 8 am.Eastern Standard Time. The maps. which are based an ((the data,are released each Thursday at$:30 a m.Eastern Time 11S. Drought Monitor Nlay 18. 2004 v..41818,3 81 EDI c#, % A H I : ' 4'tr?"-'*-1: , ■,' H s-, ''''. ' , ki 1 4 ----,„. — ' ----- -I , , 11, , ,..,..,. milli 034411/124WMPitr \ ,..,..i 0 Iri.: 4)A tonntroily Dri 0-40 Del ine atos dominant Mx/acts 4=Agocutturat(twos pastutos, --...., I. Citooflai-IA Odot Oto giav,-/tAadv, '0 roltjht- :$0,ioto HZ ItifIdloiXcal,:%,-.tatkl) 3 On(-Eotomo 4 t-k 4.-Siannitui 3 and Hi doloigltat !. ),..\ , 4 Dr6oght- Ex 0:40011.0 kr 10 typo.=Sctia inpacts, y,./ ,I,r :7 7 7:;''';':'',1 tt,id -'•,''''''.t"::' ' ' ,',,e ''''""" r.f0,24pt kt Of 4.0f f Pe-1....E.,5,C5t)broad-st,a;e cooti&aos 2,co,'xlboos mei vary' See ac t-Ofrfler):0!"Vi tert oaw7xtr/ Released Thursday. May 20,. 2004 wocasT,Ity.16trso,-;44 Auth at:alPvt d Mtslats, ,i AV*c, No Ali http:Ildrought.uni.ecklidm 6-week 12-week ewer-intents, expenmental animation animation short-term blends long-terni blends - t 0 kual animations of the Drought Monitor click here. re information on the above experimental drought blends. see ,Ww.cpc..ncep.storta,g(aviptod tic tsipredictionsiexperimental/cdbitinnigit(IA cnd-aeCeN'-,- iiitilexp night indicators that are synthesized into the Drought Monitor map are on this website,under and(..urrerr ('1 donS„ tylow rimnaht uni oilitilittilmonitnr html S/71,9{11)4 • Map 15 -35- B. Earthquake Portions of Jefferson County are located on earthquake faults. The Continental Fault connects • with the Elk Park Fault in Elk Park. The Jefferson Valley Fault and one,which is not named that runs in the approximate area of the Boulder River north of the Jefferson Valley Fault, are across the mountains on the valley side of the County. (Map 17, p29) The large earthquakes of 1925, near Clarkston- magnitude 6.6, and 1935, near Helena - magnitude 6.3,caused some damage to Jefferson County residences. There was another in 1947, near Virginia City -magnitude 6.1, which jarred foundations in Jefferson County, but did little other damage. However, the August 1959 multiple earthquakes-magnitudes 5.6 to 7.5, which centered near Hebgen Lake by Yellowstone Park, produced some damage in locations throughout Jefferson County. In Whitehall the town "rocks and rolls", "the water tank was doing quite a jig," and bricks broke loose,chimneys toppled, ceiling plaster cracked and windows were broken. Furthermore, there has been a series of"quakes" in the 5.5 to 5.9 magnitude during 1964, 1975, and 1976 near Yellowstone that have been felt in Jefferson County with little or no damage experienced. (See Map 17, p29) There are many earthquakes every year, but most of them are so minor that most people do not feel them. Montana Tech College in Butte has an active seismology department that conducts many related studies. Critical Infrastructures as identified on Tables 2, 3 &4 (pp13-16) include a number of older • buildings including the Jefferson County Courthouse, which is a four level 15,688 square foot building constructed of brick in 1888, and it has already withstood at least four strong earthquakes. The buildings not included in the Critical Infrastructure tables are businesses on the main streets of Boulder,Whitehall and Basin,which also were built of brick in the late 1880s and that have survived a number of large earthquakes. The Cardwell and Basin schools are both older two (2)-story buildings that have survived earthquake events in the past. There are vulnerable structures and infrastructure in Boulder and Whitehall that have withstood earthquake events in the past and may or may not withstand those of the future. The County government in Boulder has expanded into an annex located on the same property, the Law&Justice Center and a home converted to offices across the street. Additionally, there are three county shops, one each located in Whitehall, Boulder and Montana City. Within the City of Boulder, in addition to the county buildings, the State of Montana maintains several single story buildings. There is a residence for developmentally disabled individuals at the Montana Developmental Center, and a juvenile female detention center at the Riverside Correctional facility. It is not known how an earthquake might affect these structures. • The City of Boulder infrastructure includes a newly renovated water distribution network that -37- is fed by four pumps that keep the system full with the excess sent to a large holding tank on a hill north and east of town. The sewer system was installed in the late 50's and is due for replacement. The sewage treatment consists of a lagoon system located on the south edge of • town. An 18-mile paved renovation of Main Street completed in 2003 includes a storm drain system that empties east of town. There are several homes in Boulder that were constructed in the early to middle 1900s that are two stories. Several of these also withstood the 3 major earthquakes experienced in this area over the years. However, if an earthquake with an epicenter nearer to the town were experienced, it is not known how many of these structures would remain standing. The Town of Whitehall infrastructure includes a water system,80% of which was replaced during 1995 to 1998. The system consists of two operational wells that pump through the distribution system with the excess going into a 500,000-gallon storage tank. The sewer system was installed during the late 1950's and early 1960's with upgrades to the treatment ponds. Furthermore,Whitehall maintains 12 miles of streets with 1.5 miles still unpaved. In addition the Whitehall middle and high school buildings are single story modern construction and should withstand earthquake events of the magnitudes experienced in the past. • • -38- 0 • • O 116W 1 In#:1 112W 110W 108W r�..� CD 48N 1 tr l 5i .! t! 0 4 /1/4„—. 4814 i ' Great Falls ,e.-...'Pf414‘ . A)P el- ' j a,tt==.:€ �� tol rttt:d .�.. r d6 ' rrtlt h� S 4614 4e 4.5 Bozeman ' /? i N 44N n 7 F L' Yi� gt Al.. V V C. Floods Flooding has been an historical challenge in Jefferson County with the Jefferson, Boulder, and • Little Boulder rivers and Prickly Pear Creek overflowing their banks in times of high water and ice jams. In 1948, channel work was done on the Jefferson River near Willow Creek to protect the Willow Creek Bridge and its approaches. The Milligan Canyon Road has washed out a number of times since 1981 and most recently in 2002. This hazard has been addressed in a flood plain review and plan. There are emergency plans on file in the DES Office for some of the larger dams in Jefferson County as well as for some dams located outside of the County. There are several man-made dams,mostly located in the South end of the County. Some floodplains of the County are developed and the potential for flooding in those areas could be severe. Most of these are in the Whitehall/Cardwell area;e.g., McKeown Lane, Piedmont and Waterloo. Additionally, there are structures in the Pipestone Creek drainage and along the Boulder River as it flows past Basin near Valley Street that could be affected. The flood of 1981 caused much damage to the highway between Boulder and Basin, Cataract Road, Basin Creek Road and access to the roads along Prickly Pear Creek. Significant"rip rap" work was done when the repairs were accomplished, and the area is now much better protected. However, a large snow pack and heavy spring rains could bring water out of the Elk Horn Mountains and cause flooding from Jefferson City north to East Helena, and then • Helena Valley along Prickly Pear Creek. (Photos 1 -14, pp 4147) The Boulder River runs along the south side of Boulder just inside the city limits and two private irrigation ditches bisect the town. The construction of I-15 north and west of Boulder created increasing problems with water run off causing flooding in the northwest portion of the Boulder community. The installation of the new storm drain system in 2003 should minimize this risk. There are two irrigation ditches that border the east and west side of the Town of Whitehall. In the past these have caused flooding problems. The west ditch has been cleaned and old irrigation dams removed, which has alleviated the flooding in that area. Although there is no significant history of flooding here, still more should be done at the east side of town to further mitigate flooding potential. • -40- Post flood-High Ore Road 0 . . , fi '. •x.,. " "�`� FAA: _ i ', - - may.. . Pz" ..2 t4 ' s' ;^j•••,,,..,,,,,, ,,,kr.-0,,,.-..4,,,...,0„, • itt 4 br ~ { a '-""T Ca'..,'H K bR F 1_ "'f €, ✓ ra' y;f 1 ' b Photo 1 • Post flood - Cataract Creek Road at Saturday Night Will 'rte ••.' _ . . *"` ` ,r ta. ' - .w`v`Y '.,, _< Ills pia; s'�� cy e Photo 2 • -41- I-15 Boulder to Basin • • 3: � X � X - xy L'2Y : b d -' is g Ta . �q R a �, mot.-. ya . � fly �'� d a, qya a '� �' `" ' ^� a '� 3 .• saw 4 Via.� .aR w_._aimb�w °°�-:.. `� _� '"4 _. ,., Photo 3 Near Boulder River Bridge -West 0 �-�£� s ray _`��e ci S]sr�' r Photo 4 • -42- Boulder River Bridge t ' .,r q�a • NN s+�'�v �} ,� a � c .z�re4„��� a�srm. a. � �,z r c�` ,•?s3 i � °f��� �Cf�w°Y �# �2 ^^^-Ya9"4X.'i.#'�" ��� e� ^«-•$"� E i ms's, It{8 a Photo 5 Montana DOT and MDC • • • ..e � m Photo 6 • -43- Aerial view of Sewer Lagoons, MDC and Boulder 410 Photo 7 Hwy 69 Elk Horn Turn Off 4110 - . • • • rq'f'st;,_A kt2 4 s� I �C5 ' Photo 8 • � 1 1� i Lower Boulder Valley • Photo 9 Dunn Canyon Bridge 4110 ..... ,. sus. Y ��f 4 f •M 4.� au" Y3 Ab Photo 10 s -45- Nigger Hollow Bridge 'i 1 '"t i x x �1`��• ' ..4,,,,-- ;. ,.,-,,,:€,,r-r..:,;,,,...,0-,,,,,,,iri -, ... ,....:„.„4,-, .. ,,,.:' ,, ..z, Photo 11 I-15 Jefferson City Rest Area 0 g X v , � k r' . Y �M • _ _, r . . Photo 12 -46- Clancy Interchange i • �` �` � `Y d 8 & 5 ' r &i 'i # }� !4 a i a€x va-s r.n° .44a 1 fs £ t v>t y. E '-' �r3 ' c - dram„ 4 � ££ S ��.. ..,., . P Photo 13 Haab Lane (Hanging Tree Road) 0 Photo 14 • -47- D. Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Although there is no history of significant incidents, the potential of a hazardous materials • incident in Jefferson County is as pronounced as the next semi-truck and trailer driving down any of the number of highways and roads in the County. (Photo 16) There are so many variables that it is difficult to determine if,when or where the next incident might occur. In all areas of Jefferson County the buildings and people, are in close proximity to any one of the roads and highways that network through the County. An accidental release of HAZMAT could produce a health episode to those in the immediate and downwind areas. Interstate -15 crosses Jefferson County from the Jefferson County/Lewis &Clark County line south to Boulder and west to the Butte/Silver Bow County Line. Interstate -90 crosses Jefferson County from the Butte/Silver Bow County line and goes east to the Broadwater County line out of Three Forks. Montana Highway 2 (Montana 2) parallels I-90 and west of Whitehall Montana 41 leaves Montana 2 at Cactus Junction and connects with Montana 55 north of Silver Star in Madison County. East of Cardwell Montana 2 runs east past the Lewis and Clark Caverns to the Sappington junction with U.S. 287 and on to the county line. Montana 69 starts at the Whitehall exit from I-90 and ends just north of Boulder at the entrance to I-15, and continues through the city limits as Main Street. Montana 55 goes south from Whitehall to the Jefferson, Madison and Butte/Silver Bow lines south of Whitehall. Montana Rail Link Railroad track runs from Helena to Logan and parallels U.S. Highway 12 in • eastern Jefferson County and a spur line runs from Logan to Whitehall parallel to Division Street. (Map 18 and Photo 18) Montana 518 runs south from East Helena to Montana City and County Road 282 is the frontage road from Jefferson City north to East Helena. Non-agriculture/livestock industry is limited in Jefferson County, however, there are two (2) gold mines and a cement plant and other privately owned facilities reporting under the federal Superfund laws. The free standing law under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) Title III, the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act, requires these industries to provide the State of Montana and local governments with information concerning potential chemical hazards present in their communities. Private use of hazardous materials also is present through out the County. For example, there are fixed sites where distributors of propane for personal use have installed large propane tanks and, there are farmers and ranchers who stock supplies of chemicals for fertilizer and weed or pest control. (Photos 15 and 17) The other possible exposure of hazardous materials would come with a terrorist event with the use of biological or chemical agents. These biological or chemical agents could be induced into the human or animal population in any number of ways. • Because the possibility of a hazardous materials incident exists and the potential damage so great, this discussion of a potential release of this type has been included in the Plan. -48- Montana Rail Link •�yd:i0r,:cl 01NSh • i^� Ck".ts Poison Cnoteau• Rouen Easlha n• •Powe '.+n >ooswue . (..)\GNI areyp1e F3rrtlad• )ye GREAT FALLS t ()bola, an Ptee t c�SOVf �S°0 `` . « Levnsoyn 4 rnetre3 •_p. n X 0` p,;r 0 4'eaim q �N spaE•r 3 ���i ece . � Monra.,.i ,N:.,aa` CYy • dry.a,wa•R t41, •10,wP' 6'yS .. ... .... e�y� �bl37rF 5 •iltat,ton eta 3, L+• •,,aq°n I'S' �ito6 • -S,•`' ON5 ¢S• • • Hanlsan • .a�g ,¢• Two,f3'4,7A cfr a YCllwtUtae ""� ._ — Sii.4 1 d UP q Pocatdb- ['4iI� Ttl IImxve• FAVSF Map 18 • Pro •ane Distribution Tank in South Coun £( �., i 4:. €££ £'`S '-ate a 4.,r 6£ x . C �� v' �f`€sT + z KEG 4. q6,-q:.,,,!-4,i1 r r '. # T�, s,-, �� ° LE *^r u1- a., I S n2" 3ui epxmrv•.aay R &Q rA n . , Photo 15 • -49- Gasoline Tanker Truck a5 Y � € i n ' ads ' i [' `• �', a vf x v ry 3 '#s � a t ' , • ,z , a / ("*". .......) \ '',...:,„,-,.,::;.; !**Alottp.„„,„„ N FLYING J �; ,.... broll --- _ . I : .._.°*,...1 i i,- t coo t a ..--- Photo 16 • Hazardous Farm Materials _ r 1 S Photo 17 -50- Rail Transportation of Hazardous Materials "-• :w x+»«a °a„e.h.�. rM • f 3�e Photo 18 • -51- Chapter V Mitigation Projects • A. Mitigation Goals and Objectives Goal 1: Reduce the impact of wildland fires on the community. Objective 1.1: Protect homes and evacuation routes in the wildland-urban interface from wildfires as part of the County Fire Plan. Objective 1.2: Develop and implement a fire hazard mapping project. Objective 1.3: Support the Tri-County Fire Working Group programs to assist county property owners' projects. Objective 1.4: Support volunteer fire department fire prevention activities. Goal 2: Minimize damage from earthquakes. Objective 2.1: Better understand the earthquake hazard in Jefferson County. • In-depth fault study and digital mapping • • Educational awareness for the general public on the earthquake hazard Objective 2.2: Protect County students from earthquake hazards • Using shatter-proofing techniques, strengthen windows in schools • Secure objects in schools that could fall during an earthquake • Educational awareness for students on earthquake safety Objective 2.3: Promote greater structure safety in fault areas. • Develop construction policies where probability of earthquakes is discovered to be highest. Goal 3: Reduces losses from flooding. Objective 3.1: Prevent losses to Jefferson County infrastructure from flooding. • Install culverts and upgrade streets and roads for runoff management • Improve storm water systems in poor drainage areas Objective 3.2: Prevent losses due to flooding in chronic flood areas • Fund completed study projects Goal 4: Develop a Public Alert FM radio system that can reach all citizens during any hazard event. • Objective 4.1: Obtain permits and address all FCC rules for low power FM . -52- Objective 4.2: Develop computer controlled transmission systems to provide information services • • Include road reports, weather forecasts and conditions, emergency conditions and events, and public services. Objective 4.3: Develop local programming to provide continuous transmission. Goal 5: Increase Emergency Response Capability. Objective 1.1: Recruit and train emergency response personnel. Goal 6: Educate County citizens to cope with a potential disaster event. Objective 1.1: Develop disaster related educational programs through the county school system. B. Identifying Mitigation Projects Mitigation strategy is the course of action taken to minimize losses from disasters in the future. Rather than wait until a disaster occurs, the strategy is to move in a proactive direction with disaster prevention. All losses cannot be entirely prevented, however, some actions can be • taken as funding and opportunities become available that may reduce the impacts of disasters and eventually save taxpayers' money. 1. Wildland Fire The County Fire Plan is being updated,and with the assistance of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), this project is scheduled for completion by the end of 2004. Complete the Fire Fuel Hazard Mapping project. Continue promotion of residential fuel mitigation projects in the severe and high fire hazard risk areas identified in Maps 11-13, pp 31-33. Provide property owner collaborated sample"how to" prescriptions for individual homeowners. Take on fire fuel hazard modification projects for evacuation/transportation routes in severe and high fuel hazard areas. Encourage extension of fuel modification projects of the Forest Service and Depaitment of Natural Resources Conservation (DNRC) and BLM to private lands. Tri-County Fire Working Group is continuing to obtain funding to assist property owners with financing for these projects. Implement the requirement for dry hydrants identified by the rural fire personnel in their response areas: Bull Mountain-Sloao s Lane, Red Bridge on Hubbard Lane,White Bridge • between Hwy 69 and Lower Valley Road; Basin- Bernice, High Ore and Basin;Jefferson City- Rosewood Estates,South of Jefferson City where Prickly Pear crosses under I-15; Clancy - -53- Clancy Creek, Warm Springs Creek,two (2) on Lump Gulch, Travis Creek; Montana City - Montana City School, Ashgrove Cement Plant and the end of Jackson Creek. • Implement projects to provide water supply sources that meet state and national standards for severe to high fire fuel hazard areas or areas with limited capability or water availability. 2. Earthquake Complete an in-depth fault study of Jefferson County and finish digital mapping of County assets. Complete a study to determine earthquake readiness of County schools and other critical infrastructure. Contract with engineers to review existing plans and make recommendations, and then implement plans within fiscal constraints. Provide the FEMA Earthquake Safety Program for Schools course to help the county schools in Boulder and Whitehall and throughout the County to prepare to be self-sufficient in the aftermath of a destructive earthquake. Commence building and environment improvements such as protective "3M window film" and tie down projects in all county schools. 3. Flood Floods have washed out the Milligan Canyon Road several times in the past few years. A flood plain plan to upgrade drainage in the canyon area,collaborated with the State Hazard Mitigation Officer, Larry Akers,has been completed, is on the shelf and will be a funding priority item under the flood projects. This area will be at risk until the recommended and • engineered changes are made. An additional project has been identified in Whitehall that will involve cleaning out the unused irrigation head gates on Whitetail Creek. 4. FM Radio Alert System Jefferson County has no radio stations and relies on Butte,Helena and Bozeman for emergency broadcast messages and not all stations are received in all areas of the county. Therefore, since there is no connecting source for emergency information, a low frequency FM radio alert system is currently being developed. The county has seven (7) radio site construction permits from the FCC, which cover the entire county including coverage to remote areas. Although it is not anticipated, these permits would expire in May and August 2004, and will not be reissued if the sites are not developed. The Montana City and Whitehall sites, which would have been the first to expire,have had antennas and transmitters constructed. They have both proved to cover a large area, with reception from each available almost as far as Boulder. The FM stations will allow for broadcast of emergency messages, which affect the entire county or just a portion of it. Further, they will be used to pass information regarding road closures and conditions, • evacuations, weather storm warnings, and many of the other emergency situations that arise in a regular basis. In the event of need, the Sheriff or the Emergency Operations Center will -54- activate them. These FM stations will increase the coverage capability by making use of high-speed wireless • Internet system. Potential use of the Reverse 911 capability only works for those that have "land line" telephone service. Therefore, it will not work for those who use cell phones as their primary or sole source of communication. Non-emergency messages; e.g., public meetings, special events and school events,may also be transmitted over these stations. The County DES anticipates that the business community will become involved with sponsorships for these programs. Additionally, this system can be made to work similarly to the weather radios that turn on automatically for emergencies. 5. Emergency Services In order to increase response capability, promote recruitment and training of emergency personnel and volunteers for local emergency response agencies or to help staff the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in the event of any disaster. 6. Education It is important that citizens be prepared for any disaster and recognize that there is a perceived • seventy-two (72)hour window that citizens must be able to take care of themselves before assistance will arrive. Educational programs may be accomplished by using the school system as the catalyst,in this manner the cost for these programs will be minimized in comparison to the benefit derived. • -55- C. Implementing Mitigation Measures The aforementioned projects will be prioritized in accordance with the ranking principles • setforth in this plan in Chapter 1, Paragraph G. The results of a cost/benefit analysis and estimates of preservation of life and property will all enter into the prioritization equation. These projects will then be implemented through the LEPC, in consultation, and in conjunction,with the Tri-County Fire Working Group, its existing and future plans; and by authority of the County Commissioners, the County Growth Plan; and the necessary Boulder and Whitehall city officials, as is appropriate. Also, the progress of implementation will commence based upon on availability of funds and according to capital improvement plans for each of the effected jurisdictions. In addition,future development in the County will be considered synergistically with all the applicable county plans, such as this pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan; the County Growth Plan, the County Fire Plan. • • -56- Chapter VI Land Use and Future Development: • A. Jefferson County Land Use Much of the information in this Chapter is taken from the superb Jefferson County Growth Policy (Growth Policy) adopted on June 13, 2003. According to the Growth Policy, early settlers came to Jefferson County during the gold rush and established the towns that are today the centers of the County small town population. The towns of, Basin, Clancy, and Montana City grew from rich mineral deposits and north/south activity of the stage coach and railroad. Similarly, Whitehall grew as a railroad town supporting shipments of mineral ores and products across the country. Boulder, on the other hand, developed into an agriculture area early on as the miners turned from the search for mineral deposits to using their land in the Boulder River Valley for cattle and sheep. Many of those farms and ranches still exist today. With the down trend in mining, the thriving town of Basin once rich in placer mines has become a quiet little town relying on a few radon health mines, artists and tourism for its economy. From the railroad roundhouse in a community of railroader workers, the Clancy community has grown the most over the years, with its mountain environment,views and small town amenities, becoming a bedroom community for the larger city of Helena a short commute to • the north. Montana City, the first county seat, settled into a quiet existence for a hundred years until the building boom of the 1990's. Now,readily accessible to the population of Helena, it embraces the prosperity of restaurants, services, and beautiful homes. According to the Growth Policy, the most remarkable land use changes have been to residential and recent residential growth has occurred at the wildland/urban interface. The Growth Policy identifies the peril, particularly wildland fire, of such development and has taken that to task, as will be pointed out in the next section of this Plan. Although the culture and economy of the County has been dependent on the land, for the most part it has moved away from mineral and rock mining and timber harvest to farming, ranching and residential subdivisions. Although forests cover almost half of the County land area and timber harvesting does still take place,most of the forested mountain land is now primarily utilized for hunting and recreation. In all, however,farming and ranching became the way of life during the twentieth century and agriculture remains the predominant land use throughout the county. B. Analyzing Development Trends • The Growth Policy, which looks keenly and extensively into the history of the County and the present dynamics, projects an increasing need for housing,jobs, and public services. These -57- trends are fully analyzed and with full cognizance of potential hazards, the formal policy has recommended steps to ensure that subdivision regulations apply to all subdivisions. They include: • 1. Provide proof of adequate potable water; 2. Have acceptable sewage disposal and storm water drainage; 3. Provide appropriate fire protection, emergency access and ingress/egress roads; 4. Include dust control and weed control plans; 5. Have fire protection plans; and 6. Include a wildlife corridor plan The Planning Board recommends the development of a land use classification system that will identify basic resource areas subject to development and use constraints that include public ownership. Steep slope, flood susceptibility,poor access and lack of potable water supply and/or fire suppression capability are conditions that discourage development in identified areas. The City of Boulder Planning Board is actively working on a Growth Policy and the Town Council of Whitehall is considering a growth policy project prefatory to infrastructure upgrades and improvements in the next several years. • • -58- Chapter VII Plan Maintenance • The county DES and LEPC plans to complete an annual, or at the least a biannual,hazard analysis to identify potential hazard problem areas and mitigation efforts by other agencies. This analysis also would predict the County's ability to address currently identified potential hazards through a capability assessment and, by way of this process, discover additional hazards that may represent a potential impact on the citizens and property of the County. For example,the Plan will be updated to include the results of the Geographic Information System (GIS) survey to identify and locate critical facilities and emergency support facilities and functions. Also, the County Commissioners have awarded the contract for preparation of a County Fire Plan, and when that project is complete, that plan will be incorporated in this Plan. As additional hazards are identified as potential risk, and as mitigation projects are completed, this Plan will be updated accordingly. Further, within the five year review period required by 44 CFR 201.3(d)(2), the County will submit the Plan and any revisions to the state DES and to FEMA for approval. Annual meetings, open to the public, will be held and these meetings will be advertised in the local newspapers. Thus, public participation in the annual analysis and periodic plan maintenance process will be encouraged. Involvement may be accomplished by attending and participating in noticed meetings and/or by writing and submitting proposals to the Jefferson • County LEPC chair at: Jefferson County Disaster&Emergency Services P.O. Box H Boulder, MT 59632 (406) 2254035 In addition, the DES Coordinator and the LEPC will be responsible for completing the five- year plan update and submitting such to the State Hazard Mitigation Officer and the FEMA for approval and acceptance. -59- RECEIVED ER E• RESOLUTION 08-2005 AUG 2�' 2005 HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN DISASTER&EOFMONTA AERVjCES STATE Df MONTANA JEFFERSON COUNTY,MONTANA WHEREAS, all citizens and property within Jefferson County are at risk from a wide range of hazards such as,but not limited to wildland fire, flood, earthquake and hazardous materials; and WHEREAS, the County,pursuant to Section 322,Mitigation Planning, of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, enacted by Section 104 of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-390) and the Interim Final Rule published in the Federal Register on February 26, 2002 at 44 CFR Part 201, is required to have an approved Hazard Mitigation Plan in order to receive future federal disaster mitigation funds; and WHEREAS, a Hazard Mitigation Plan will guide the County in Making decisions for pre-disaster and post-disaster mitigation projects. • NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of County Commissioners of Jefferson County, Montana, hereby adopts the Hazard Mitigation Plan dated January 1, 2005. DATED this 23`'day of February, 2005. ATTEST: J L5� BONNIE RAMEY OMAS E. LYTHGO , C CLERK AND RECORDER , AtA; /l Tr(,Gl a CHUCK NOTBOHM,COMMISSIONER �� KEN WEBER, COMMISSIONER • Hazard Mitigation Plan Town of Whitehall, Montana • Resolution No. 02-LO5—C) / WHEREAS, all citizens and property within the Town of Whitehall are at risk from a wide range of hazards such as, but not limited to,flooding, earthquake and hazardous materials, WHEREAS, the Town, pursuant to Section 322. Mitigation Planning, of the Robert T.Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, enacted by Section 104 of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-390) and the Interim Final Rule published in the Federal Register on February 25, 2002 at 44 CFR Part 201,is required to have an approved Hazard Mitigation Plan in order to receive future federal disaster mitigation funds, WHEREAS, a Hazard Mitigation Plan will Guide the City in making decisions for pre-disaster and post-disaster mitigation projects, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Town Council of Whitehall, Montana,hereby adopts the Hazard Mitigation Plan dated January 1, 2005. PASSED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of Whitehall, Montana, this.day of 2005 • ►er;/'oss, Mayor. • • Hazard Mitigation Plan City of Boulder, Montana Resolution No. ; 0 Olt 0 'y WHEREAS, all citizens and property within the City of Boulder are at risk from a wide range of hazards such as,but not limited to, flooding, earthquake and hazardous materials, WHEREAS, the City, pursuant to Section 322. Mitigation Planning, of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, enacted by Section 104 of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-390) and the Interim Final Rule published in the Federal Register on February 25, 2002 at 44 CFR Part 201, is required to have an approved Hazard Mitigation Plan in order to receive future federal disaster mitigation funds, WHEREAS, a Hazard Mitigation Plan will Guide the City in making decisions for pre-disaster and post-disaster mitigation projects, NOW,THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City Council of Boulder, Montana, hereby adopts the Hazard Mitigation Plan dated January 1, 2005. 0 PASSED AND ADOPTED by the City Council of Boulder, Montana, this )-. \'.. day of FebnUM , 2005 1 aryl D Craft, May:r f w / i L • ' ...------ • APPENDIX B Public Meeting Documentation 1). Newspaper Article - June 3, 2002 2). County LEPC Press Release (date) 3). Pre-Disaster Mitigation Planning Public Meeting Agenda 4). Letter to Residents and Agencies of Jefferson County 5). Sign-In Sheets • a). Whitehall b). Boulder c). Clancy -AP4- The Montana Hazard Mitigation office of the Division of Montana Disaster and Emergency . Services(DES)will be nominating Montana communities,counties and/or jurisdictions to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)for new Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program. Jefferson County has applied to participate in this program. These grant funds will provide technical and financial assistance for such a plan to include Jefferson County and the Towns of Whitehall and Boulder. Jefferson County DES Coordinator Jay Cole and Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) chair,Sally Buckles have completed the grant application and submitted it to DES in Helena. This program is pro-active and gives an incentive to analyze the hazards in the county as well as the possibility of receiving money to fund projects that would mitigate the risks that are identified in the plan. Writing the program will require input from all areas in the county and if you have identified an area that you believe could benefit from some planning and provide a project that could be undertaken prior to any disaster, please share this information with the LEPC at Box H, Boulder, MT: 59632. Attachment 1 • 6 PRE-DISASTER MITIGATION PROGRAM • Community Meetings Press Release Sally Buckles, County DES Coordinator, is inviting all interested parties to participate in determining what will be in the Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan, which is being required for all government jurisdictions. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is looking for ways to reduce the costs of disasters and the mandate is for local jurisdictions to prepare a plan,which will be proactive rather than reactive to the eventuality of any disaster,natural or man-made. Community meetings will be held in January 2003 to analyze hazards,determine the risks/vulnerability and develop projects to mitigate those risks. We all have a stake in the outcome of this project. The meeting times and places are listed below: South Jefferson County -Whitehall Town Hall on January 22 at 7:00pm Contact Terry Ross at 287-3972 or John Janik at 287-3223. Boulder,Basin and Valley-Jefferson County District Courtroom,January 23, 2003 at 7:00pm Contact Megan Bullock at 225-4126 or the DES office at 225-4035. North Jefferson County,Clang School Multi-Purpose Room January 28,2003 at 7:00pm • Contact Karen Miller at 933-5981 or Jim Pearson at 442-7576 Attachment 2 • Pre-Disaster Mitigation Planning AGENDA • Whitehall - January 22 , 2003 Boulder - January 23 , 2003 Clancy - January 28 , 2003 7 :00pm Meeting called to order Sign in and introductions Information about the Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan Criteria for the Plan Discussion on Risk Assessment 7 : 30pm Small work group break-outs 8 : 00pm • Resume with full group for reports Discussion on Identifying projects 8 : 30pm Small work group break-outs Resume with full group for reports Determine need for further meetings 9 : 00pm Adjourn meeting S • •• Office of Emergency ment- T 14k A CourthOtfe,A3. Box H Botldey lvIta 59632-0249 '--_ Telephone 406-225-4035 • t. Cell 406-431-2184 Date: January 8, 2003 To: Residents and organizations of Jefferson County From: Sally Buckles, DES Coordinator Re: Pre-Disaster Mitigation Planning There will be three community meetings held in the county this month to gather interested parties to participate in determining what will be in the Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan. This plan is being required of all government jurisdictions. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is looking for ways to educe the costs of disasters and the mandate is for local jurisdictions o prepare a plan, which will be proactive rather than reactive to the eventuality of any disaster, natural or man-made. Future funding through FEMA depends on having a Plan in place. During these meetings participants will analyze hazards, determine the risks/vulnerability and develop projects to mitigate those risks. We all have a stake in the outcome of this project. We will be studying the history of past events and determine current hazards that might threaten the county. It will be necessary to estimate the types and number of structures at risk as well as infrastructures at risk. Each community within the county has individual risks that need to be addressed, but without your input, we may not identify all of those risks. As individuals and organizations that have a history with Jefferson County your input and knowledge is greatly needed. The meetings are as follows : Whitehall Town Hall, January 22, 2003; Jefferson County Courtroom in Boulder, January 23, 2003 and at the Clancy School Lunch room on January 28, 2003. All meeting will start at 7:OOpm Alind we will try to adjourn by 9: 00pm. If there is active discussion we an decide whether to continue or to hold another meeting. • • • Pre-disaster Mitigation Whitehall Sign In Sheet Planning January 22, 2003 Name Address Phone E-mail Hourly Wage Miles Traveled fit 9 �Q p A Srac7 k4 , ,n ,„ $S D�"Irll..pa. O 4, Gd,,,,// „atr=6s'Ye` S(!ad'r6sYS @�l u/. 4/o r'UM ( Mat/4/54J &,X S97 ri44,444// fl?-3vg7 1n*hnrrbin-re 4. cal, re rry €7 1(05 5 6131 cA(Tehkl l 29'7-Per t l5trv5'&� rN— tea.co M kk' ne. 9 u!S/w ra. &.4 74-3 WtiLktikal ott7 - CU? JjS €) I,7 -+-A • ca ,-� t o r t. i•109,..ye✓iewp,` . /+ w— .0 !a 09( ((kv4( ie,447/ `s g- - , U z-E. RICK &ONu,ss Th)o1e Ia Lc) I.L.L �i.AA . per r�eAsss /R7 • ao et-- _ lC `aer S enne. A3t,(..51:eIdle tai CO 05F 5. 2r-32'2', • Dave. &/e aas( 3'S/ (of i,44,.( ,2c7-3/72i . Rol Ai (lefty 4,4 t12I // 81- 5en I, d'7 -S. / r9 • el 5 Pre-disaster Mitigation Planning Boulder Sign In Sheet January 23, 2003 --Name Address Phone E-mail Hourly Wage Miles Traveled `" ?Mt'r L4ei -eic-3oki C cxle 0410 mkt- PO 6K 52_ n MT .2.?S3 73 sA✓ d& 119-- z o (cv ao/,aw) Me p„.1 &lab c'_. EStnc w- /Jr- (3a,..1-�. Nv" ZzS--41 LCD \owl l.44 eae,,..Z .� / l w-l-w o;4 .con, izi 3 .4/ 4.4,11-049ef 6 N/`/ i/yy-�jd a 54 v ar5.(,s 7`w .ryf us �IHY7o,.++il Zs G 4/ens Air .silZt 0,Lfc.Jt MOii•Otsti 8 ox 8? 2.2s /IS • 4r s`96. 3r /t?A { coQd ..•p-4.0 BC‘1 � � ' 2. ,,9-332( l • • • • • • Pre-disaster Mitigation Clancy Sign In Sheet January 28 2003 Planning Name Address Phone E-mail r rt I[ter 65 Oka) tit .� !?d '333.Lam- ., Hourly Wage Mlles Traveled ^' e [ltLvYU i. �i i •�iLit Afc�a�.14 lLrda.cop, I , 1I 0 11 , dal Lc 9ar4IMi1v l�Ctr "5-lvit�I�r,CO�`bl --"S:t. \ 1 os A c 26 $\, Sv;.¢yr n; • Ii ba.-(cc (x<s\J 'ct. \, C4 7 ON.% • •.. ., ! i . r I Rr/07C /6 26S-06,7;346Iie'/ tlk7-022. N4,l.Gs.e1CO to kws -CIt?ICaimr.ic. Cf ���r,�Q ��/,,••rr 1kr (-cep/ 3 410 Air 047.1) Cd ys7-9aas - Caait...J6 p co,7., ....-P, uS . i I Ale /Xi5 PA j f `197.4,6A, dcecAle34, lc.) y,eTi-4•Scv . Alt,as 3z APPENDIX C • Acronyms BLM Bureau of Land Management CFR Code of Federal Regulations DNRC Department of Natural Resources and Conservation DES Disaster and Emergency Services EOC Emergency Operations Center FCC Federal Communications Commission FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency FM Frequency Modulation HMGP Hazard Mitigation Grant Program • LEPC Local Emergency Planning Committee USC United States Code www World Wide Web SHMT State Hazard Mitigation Team USGS United States Geological Service LLC Limited Liability Corporation USFS United states Forest Service RC&D Resource Council and Development • -AP5- REGION/trill ! PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-1 FEMA Region VIII Final June 25, 2002 Instructions for using the attached Crosswalk Reference Document for Review and Submission of Local Mitigation Plans to the State Hazard Mitigation Officer Attached is a crosswalk reference document,which is based on the Draft Report State and Local Plan Interim Criteria Under the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 published by FEMA HQ and dated March 26, 2002. This document was based on the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule. The purpose of the crosswalk is to provide a tool to local jurisdictions in developing and submitting Mitigation Plans under Section 322 of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000. The crosswalk can be used to assist local or multi-jurisdiction entities in the process of developing and reviewing Local or Multi-jurisdictional plan(s). Each Local or Multi-jurisdictional plan should be reviewed by the pertinent local jurisdictional entity prior to submitting them to the respective state. In addition as stated in the 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206 Hazard Mitigation Grant Program; Interim Final Rule §201.6(d)(1) "Plans must be submitted to the State Hazard Mitigation Officer for initial review and coordination. The State will then send the plan to the appropriate FEMA Regional Office for formal review and approval." The form located on Page 13 provides for local entity review and state review prior to the state submitting the plan to FEMA Region VIII for formal review and approval. Tribes may submit hazard mitigation plans through their respective states or they can directly submit their plans to FEMA Region VIII. This means they can write a Local or Multi jurisdictional Plan as a sub-grantee or they may write a Standard or Enhanced State Plan as a Grantee. When tribes are considering how they want to develop and submit their plans, they need to consider whether or not they want to be Grantees directly from FEMA or Sub-grantees through their respective states. The deciding factor would be how they want to apply for and receive Predisaster Mitigation Grant projects, Hazard Mitigation Grant Program projects or Flood Mitigation Assistance projects. Interested tribes can determine this by talking with their State Hazard Mitigation Officer or their respective FEMA Regional Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA) Division. In any case, each tribe should review their own plans before submitting them to their state or FEMA Regional office. Following are explanations of each column. • Column 1 references: The pertinent section from 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206 Interim Final Rule • Column 2 directly quotes the 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206 Interim Final Rule. • Column 3 is for the tribe and/or local jurisdiction to indicate the page number(s)/Annex or Section in their plan where the requirement has been met. • Column 4 indicates on what page or pages more detailed information can be found regarding the requirements located in the State and Local Plan Interim Criteria Under the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 document. • Column 5 provides space for State/FEMA comments and for scoring and approval of the plan. REGICOVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-2 LOCAL MITIGATION PLAN PROFILE STATE/FEMA REGION VIII Point of Contact: Date of Submission to State: Sally Buckles 1/7/05 Title: Jefferson county DES Coordinator Agency: Jefferson county NFIP Status (Single Jurisdiction) Phone Number: 406-225-4035 Participating X Non-Participating El Multi-jurisdiction: ® YES ❑NO N/A* NFIP Status (for mapped communities) (If yes, list each jurisdiction below:) 1. Jefferson County, Montana ❑ Participating ® Non-Participating ❑ 2. Boulder,Montana Participating X Non-Participating ❑ 3. Whitehall, Montana ❑ Participating X Non-Participating ❑ 4. ❑ Participating ❑ Non-Participating ❑ 5. ❑ Participating ❑ Non-Participating ❑ 6. ❑ Participating ❑ Non-Participating ❑ 7. ❑ Participating ❑ Non-Participating ❑ 8. ❑ Participating ❑ Non-Participating ❑ Local Plan POC: Please complete the information requested on this profile form. The form will be submitted with your plan to the state. Utilizing the attached crosswalk, compare your local plan content with the criteria outlined. Please note under the column heading"Page Number(s) in Plan"the page(s)where the criteria can be found in the plan being submitted for review. Thank you. I * Not applicable for communities not mapped and/or who do not have an identified flood risk. REGIC•VIll PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-3 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further explan Met/Not Met anon Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the State and Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where crl da the Information nder Is located In the Disaste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex MIticad Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or oe 2000 Page#(s) Docum ent Prerequisites NOTE: All prerequisites 3-1 must be met before the plan w *sh can be approved. ego 4-5 Adoption by the Local [The local hazard mitigation N/A 3-2 Montana: Not Applicable Governing Body plan shall include] (wOtksh documentation that the plan eel) FEMA: Requirement has been formally adopted by 4-5 §201.6(c)(5) the governing body of the jurisdiction requesting approval of the plan(e.g., City Council, County Commissioner, Tribal Council)... REGISVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-4 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan Unsatisfactory ation Needs Improvement and Satisfactory exempt Outstanding es see Page# indicat ed below from the State Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where cr laa the information Under` is located in the Basic Plan Disaster Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex nM I ati Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or onAct Page#(s) Docum ent Multi-Jurisdictional For multi jurisdictional plans, 3-3 Montana: Not met. Must be signed before goes to FEMA. Plan Adoption each jurisdiction requesting Chptr II-B;p- (wo*sh FEMA: approval of the plan must 8. «t� (Where Applicable) document that it has been 4-5 formally adopted. App A. Requirement §201.6(c)(5) REGICOVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-5 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met expian anon Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the State and Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where criteria the information par is located in the Dthe isaste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex 1itIaat! Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and section or of�0 0 Page#(s) Docum ent Multi-Jurisdictional Multi jurisdictional plans Montana: Not Applicable Planning Participation (e.g., watershed plans)may be 3-4 accepted, as appropriate, as FEMA: (worksh (Where Applicable) long as each jurisdiction has een participated in the process... 4-5 Requirement Statewide plans will not be §201.6(a)(3) accepted as multi- jurisdictional plans. REGI•VIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-6 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan Unsatisfactory atiO° Needs Improvement and Satisfactory exampl Outstanding es see Page# indicat ed below from the State an Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where Criteria the Information under is located In the D the as e Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex M ati Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or :—;121-1% Page#(s) Docum ent Planning Process [.....the planning process shall Montana: Satisfactory. § 201.6(b)(1-3): include:] (1)an opportunity for public comment on the plan during drafting stage and 3-5 prior to plan approval.....(2) (vkorksh input includes neighboring cep communities, local and 4-5 regional agencies involved in hazard mitigation activities, and agencies having authority to regulate development including businesses, academia and other private and non-profit interests....(3) as appropriate, review and incorporate existing plans, studies. reports and technical REGItOVlll PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-7 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further explan Met/Not Met ation Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the to and Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where Crherla the information it is located in the Disaste Basic Plan r Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex Mivaatl Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or of on Act Page#(s) Docum ent Documentation of the [The plan must document] the Montana: Satisfactory Planning Process planning process used to Chptr II-A; 3-6 develop the plan, including p-7. (woricsh FEMA: Requirement how it was prepared,who was an §201.6(c)(1): involved in the process, and App. B. 4-5 how the public was involved. Risk Assessment 3-9 (worx,■ cot) 4-5 REGICOVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3_8 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County.Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further MetNot Met explan Unsatisfactory etion Needs Improvement and Satisfactory exampl Outstanding as see Page# Indicat ed below from the State and Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where criteria the Information Under is located in the `he Disaste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex MIS Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and section or of Page#(s) 2000 Docum ent Identifying Hazards [The risk assessment shall Montana: Satisfactory include a] description of the Chptr III-A; 3-10 Requirement type....of all natural hazards p-9. §201.6(c)(2)(i): that can affect the (worksh cet) jurisdiction... 4.5 FEMA: REGIOOVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-9 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further explan Met/Not Met anon Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the State and Local Plan trig""m STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where Criteria the Information Under is located in the Basic Plan Isaste Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex M ati Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or ur ct Page#(s) Docum ent Profiling Hazard Events [The risk assessment shall 3-14 Montana: Satisfactory include a] description of Chptr I-F(2); Requirement the...location and extent of all p-5. (WUksh FEMA: ) §201.6(c)(2)(i): natural hazards that can affect 4-5 the jurisdiction. The plan Chptr III-A; shall include information on p-9. previous occurrences of hazard events and on the See also: probability of future hazard Chptr IV-A- events. D; pp 29, 37, 38, 40, 48. Table 1; p-9. REGI•VIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-10 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For - Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan ation Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# Indicat ed below from the State and cel Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where c terra the information ntler is located In the the Disaste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex Mleuau Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or of 2000 Page#(s) Docum ent Assessing Vulnerability: [The risk assessment shall Chptr III-B; Montana: Satisfactory Identifying Assets include a] description of the pp-11, 12, 3-18 jurisdiction's vulnerability to 27, 28. FEMA: Requirement the hazards described in cworksh OOO( ) paragraph(c)(2)(i) of this Chptr IV-A- eel) §201.6 c 2 ii A : 4-5 section. This description shall D; pp 29, 37, include an overall summary of 38, 40, 48. each hazard and its impact on (cont. on page 8) the community. Photos 1-18; pp 41-47, 49- 51. REGI•VIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-11 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan atlon Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page it indicat ed below from the State and Local Ian In m Indicate where Criteria STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments the information Is located in the Dlsaste Basic Plan r Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex MIS' d Section or en A Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and s) of 2000 Page 9 Docum ent (cont. from page 7) The plan should describe (cont. p7) Montana. Outstanding vulnerability in terms of: Tables 2,3,4; Assessing Vulnerability: • The types and numbers of pp 13-16 3-18 FEMA: Identifying Assets existing and future buildings, infrastructure, Maps 1-10; (`"r Requirement and critical facilities pp 17-26. 4-5 §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(A): located in the identified hazard areas... Maps 11-17; pp 31-36. REGICOVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-12 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206;Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan anon Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es sae Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the State mat Local Plan Interim Indicate where Criteria STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments the information Under is located in the Basic Plan Mast. Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex Migggg Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and section or of 26000 Page#(s) Docum ent Assessing Vulnerability: [The plan should describe Montana: Outstanding Estimating Potential vulnerability in terms of an] Chptr III-B; 3-22 Losses estimate of the potential dollar pp-11, 12, losses to vulnerable structures 27, 28. (wurksh eet) Requirement identified in paragraph 4.5 FEMA: §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(B): (c)(2)(i)(A) of this section and Tables 2,3,4; a description of the pp 13-16 methodology used to prepare the estimate... Chptr IV-A; p-29 Table 5; p-30 REGICOVII1 PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-13 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan Unsatisfactory anon Needs Improvement and exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the State an Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where Criteria the information D—"g Di is located in the the saste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex MMI°ati Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or o�2 ACt #Is) Docum ent Assessing Vulnerability: [The plan should describe Montana: Satisfactory Analyzing Development vulnerability in terms of] Chapter V-C; 3-24 Trends providing a general p56 FEMA: description of land uses and (works)) eel) Requirement development trends within the Chapter 4-5 §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(C): community so that mitigation VI-A,B; pp- options can be considered in 56-57. future land use decisions. Multi-Jurisdictional For multi jurisdictional plans, Montana: Risk Assessment the risk assessment section Chapter 3-26 must assess each jurisdiction's III-B; pp 11- FEMA: Requirement risks where they vary from the 12. (works)) eet) §201.6(c)(2)(iii): risks facing the entire 4-5 planning area. REGISVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-14 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further MetlNot Met explan Unsatisfactory ation Needs Improvement and Satisfactory exampl es see Outstanding Page# Indicat ed below from the State an Locsl Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where Criteria the information naer is located in the me Disaste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex Mkluad Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and section or s a Page Ms) Docum ant Mitigation Strategy The mitigation strategy is No §201.6(c)(3 provided [based on existing Sped authorities, policies, f Guida programs and resources, nee and its ability to expand on and improve these existing tools. Local Hazard Mitigation [The hazard mitigation Montana: Goals strategy shall include: a] Chapter I- 3-30 description of mitigation goals F(3); pp 5-6. FEMA: Requirement to reduce or avoid long-term (worksh ccp §201.6(c)(3)(i): vulnerabilities to the identified Chapter V-A; 4-6 hazards. pp 52, 53. REGit0V1l1 PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-15 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further explan Met/Not Met anon Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exempt Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the State Lai Local Plan Interim[ Indicate where Criteria STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments the information Under is located in the She D isaste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex Min I and Section or on Act Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule anpage#(s) oo2• 00 m nit Identification and [The mitigation strategy shall Montana: Satisfactory Analysis of Mitigation include a] section that Chapter 3-34 Measures identifies and analyzes a V-B(1)-(6); FEMA: comprehensive range of pp 52-54. t worksh ec9 Requirement specific mitigation actions and 4-6 §201.6(c)(3)(ii): projects being considered to reduce the effects of each hazard, with particular emphasis on new and existing buildings and infrastructure. REGICADVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-16 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan ation Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# __ indicat ed below from the State Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where Criteria the information Und crier is located in the h Basic Plan Dias to Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex agog and Section or __Lon Act Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule anpage Rs) o 2000 ent Implementation of [The mitigation strategy Montana: Mitigation Measures section shall include] an Chptr V-C; 3-36 action plan describing how the p-56. FEMA: Requirement actions identified in section (woricsh 201.6 c)(3)(iii a § ( ): (c)(3)(ii) will be prioritized, Chptr I-G; pp 4-6 implemented, and 6,9. administered by the local jurisdiction. Prioritization shall include a special emphasis on the extent to which benefits are maximized according to a cost benefit review of the proposed projects and their associated costs. REGItOVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-17 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan ation Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exempt Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the State and Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where Criteria the information under Di is located in the the saste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex g M Iaad a Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or of 2900 Page#(s) Docum ant Multi-jurisdictional For multi jurisdictional plans, Montana: Mitigation Strategy there must be identifiable Chptr V-B, 3-40 action items specific to the pp 53-55. FEMA: Requirement jurisdiction requesting FEMA cworksh eo §201.6(c)(3)(iv): approval or credit of the plan. 4-6 Plan Maintenance 3-43 Procedures works!' cc) 4-6 REGISVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-18 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan Unsatisfactory anon Needs Improvement and Satisfactory exampl es age Outstanding Page# Indicat ed below from the State and Local Plan n prim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where Criteria the information Under Is located In the L Dlsaste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex Mii Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or of SS1 Page#(s) Docum ent Monitoring, Evaluating, [The plan maintenance Montana: and Updating the Plan process shall include a section Chapter VII; 3-44 describing the] method and p59. FEMA: Requirement schedule of monitoring, (wwrl)sh §201.6(c)(4)(i): evaluating, and updating the 4-6 mitigation plan within a five- year cycle. REGI•VIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-19 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further Met/Not Met explan anon Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page* _ indicat ed below from the State and Local Plan Interim STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where .Q_ a the information under is located In the the Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex Mldoatl Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or of 20 0 Page#(S) Docum ent Implementation [The plan shall include a] Montana: Through Existing process by which local Chapter 3-48 Programs governments incorporate the V-C, p-56. FEMA: requirements of the mitigation (worksh eel) Requirement plan into other planning Chapter VII, 4-6 §201.6(c)(4)(ii): mechanisms such as p59 comprehensive or capital improvement plans, when appropriate... REGItOVIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-20 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206;Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further explan Ma Unsatisfactory Met anon explan and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indlcat ed below from the State Local Plan In eri STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where c the information own r is located in the O taste Basic Plan Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex MItIaati Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or of 2000 Page#(s) Datum ent Continued Public [The plan maintenance Montana: Involvement process shall include a] Chapter 3-50 discussion on how the VII, p 59. FEMA: Requirement community will continue (worksh eel) §201.6(c)(4)(iii): public participation in the plan 4-6 maintenance process. _ Additional State Not Applicable Requirements worksh 4-6 * Insert State Requirement (Werksh Not Applicable eel) pp 4-6 * Insert State Requirement (wo l)sl, Not Applicable ee 4-6 REGI4VIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-21 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206; Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan For Scoring System further ezplan McVNot Met aeon Unsatisfactory and Needs Improvement exampl Satisfactory es see Outstanding Page# indicat ed below from the State and Local Plan fin, STATE/FEMA Reviewer Comments Indicate where C erla the information ntler is located in the sa s Dlsate Basic Plan r Section from the Interim Requirement as taken from and/or Annex Midaati Final Rule Part 201 the Interim Final Rule and Section or of 2000 Page#(s) Docum :nut * Insert State Requirement iw°` sn Not Applicable eeo PP 4-6 *States that have additional requirements can add them in the appropriate sections of the plan or create a new section. States need then modify this worksheet to record the score for those requirements. REGI•VIII PLAN CROSSWALK • • 3-22 FEMA Region VIII Local Mitigation Plans Part 3 Plan Review Criteria Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206;Interim Final Rule Name of Plan Jefferson County,Montana Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Plan Local Mitigation Plan Review Local Requirement Local Plan Reviewed by: Title: Date: January 5,2005 Peter Bogy Member, County LEPC 406-494-5558 Local Plan Submitted to the State by: Title: Date: January 7, 2005 Sally Buckles County DES Coordinator State Requirement State Reviewer: Title: Date: Larry Akers SHMO FEMA Requirement FEMA Reviewer: Title: Date: Date Received in FEMA Region VIII Plan Not Approved Plan Approved Date Approved