Loading...
2007 HEADWATERS RC&D AREA PLAN 1 Headwaters RC&D Area, 1 1 1 1 -ik AREA PLAN 1 2007 1 i Resource Conservation & 1 Development Area, Inc. ( RC&D) 1 305 West Mercury, Suite 211 • Butte, MT 59701 • Telephone: (406) 782-7333 • Fax: (406) 782-9675 AX1'10J_N' AL UA17MUA OVYSET COA-LITION , 1NU . I Landowners of Cropland, Agroforestry, Forest land and Range Fand Can Benefit . . National Carbon Offset Coalition (NCOC) invites landowners, Agricultural, Range, al members, consultants and agency staff to learn about the :OC's pilot carbon credit trading effort as well as learn the and Forest Lands �plication process for submitting carbon sequestration projects. Carbon Credit Trading Workshop OC is an aggregating member of the Chicago Climate - - -- --- change (CCX) and is working with landowners to create carbon questration projects, while the CCX has initiated a pilot market- sed system to trade the resulting carbon credits. ,X,; ,r e NCOC is seeking cropland, agroforestry, rangeland, forest ds that meet the following criteria to enter onto the market ice. Cropland—no-till chem. Fallow or continuous cropping, CRP/grassland established since 1999; Items of Discussion Agroforestry—field and farmstead wind breaks, riparian, forest buffers and/or Forestry—reforestation of previously forested Carbon Sequestration lands not naturally regenerating; — What is it? And how Afforestation—establishment of forest stands of trees on lands Do We Package It For capable of supporting tree production but not historically in the Market? forest, fire rehab, riparian forest buffers, forest health projects Carbon Market — NCOC and management of existing stands; and urban forests planted Affiliate Organizations since January 1 , 1990; Roles Rangeland—grazing management that employs sustainable Eligible Land Use stocking rates, rotational grazing and seasonal use. Practices, Application Ag Methane (capture or destruction) Forms & Procedures Date city Place Time Summary & Questions Great Room Workshop Presenter v. 26, 2007 Dillon Swzgood Technology Center 3:30-5:30 Ted Dodge, NCOC v. 27, 2007 Deer Community Center 3:30-5:30 Lodge (behind Sheriff's Office) Granite County Museum For more information Dv. 29, 2007 Philipsburg Courtney Hotel 3:00-5:00 contact: South Samsone Street 4-H Community Center Emily Tafoya )ec. 3, 2007 Townsend 189 Hwy 12 E 3:00-5:00 (406) 491-4472; (2 miles east of Townsend) or )ec. 5, 2007 Virginia St Paul Episcopal Church 3:00-5:00 Ted Dodge City 102 E Idaho (406) 491-4471 Iffice Location- 305 - - Room 408, Butte, Montana 59701 vvvvvv.ncoc.us HEADWATERS R C D AREA INC BALANCE SHEET As of October 31, 2007 ASSETS Current Assets Checking/Savings 107•GLACIER BANK CHECKING-MICRO-Temp Restriccted 750.03 108 GLACIER BANK MONEY MARKET-Temp Restricted 90,439.87 109 GLACIER BANK ADVANTAGE-Temp Restricted 85,645.82 118•GRANITE MTN BANK-EDAICDBG-Temp Restricted 198,892.36 119 GRANITE MOUNTAIN-IRP-Temp Restricted 238,146.57 121 GRANITE MOUNTAIN-EDA SAV-Temp Restricted 12,83316 125 FIRST NATIONAL BANK 2,546.36 130• US BANK CHECKING 12,003.71 131 - US BANK SAVINGS 223,626.94 132• US BANK-CANTON CHURCH-Temp Restricted 45,440.19 133•US BANK-VISITOR CENTERIYELLOW 3,158.09 134-US BANK-MICRO LLR-Temp Restricted 10,264.09 145-PEOPLES BANK-Temp Restricted 415,764.51 149-PETTY CASH 50.00 Total Checking/Savings 1,339,761.70 Accounts Receivable 1000•ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 40,129.90 Total Accounts Receivable 40,129.90 Other Current Assets 153•PREPAID EXPENSES 10,358.96 170-ALLOWANCE FOR DOUBTFUL ACCTS -5,026.00 Total Other Current Assets 5,332.96 Total Current Assets 1,385,224.56 Fixed Assets 175•EQUIPMENT 44,277.70 180-ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION -37,122.00 Total Fixed Assets 7,155.70 A Other Assets 185•DIRECT LOAN 1,608,478.06 185.05 LESS ALDC INVESTMENT PARTIC -198.73 190•ALLOWANCE FOR BAD LOANS-MICRO -3,950.00 195-LOAN LOSS RESERVE 195.05 RIP LOAN LOSS RESERVE -7,500.00 195-LOAN LOSS RESERVE-Other -28,080.00 Total 195 LOAN LOSS RESERVE -35,560.00 Total Other Assets 1,568,749.33 TOTAL ASSETS 2,961,129.59 2 HEADWATERS R C D AREA INC BALANCE SHEET As of October 31, 2007 LIABILITIES&EQUITY Liabilities Current Liabilities Accounts Payable 2000 -ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 29,627.20 Total Accounts Payable 29,627.20 Other Current Liabilities 205-PAYROLL LIABILITIES 205.05 SUTA 7.91 205.20. FWH/FICA 3,116.50 205.30-MED INS PAYABLE 0.29 Total 205-PAYROLL LIABILITIES 3,12470 222. DUE TO ECONOMIC DEV ADMIN 27"16 230• DUE TO VISITOR'S CENTER 1,243.09 230.1 - DUE TO YELLOW RIBBON PROD 1,325.00 232• DUE TO JEFFERSON CO MMRLF 999.24 233• DUE TO ECON DEV SUMMIT 77,694.47 237• DUE TO HERITAGE PARK-TOWNSEND 1,050.38 240• DUE TO CANTON CHURCH 43,774.16 243-DUE TO NATL HOUSING CONF 8,000.00 250 REFUNDABLE ADVANCES 846,89 255 ACCRUED COMPENSATED ABSENCES 3,763.81 Total Other Current Liabilities 141,848.90 Total Current Liabilities 171,476.10 Long Term Liabilities 270- MICROBUSINESS LOAN 233,252.00 275• IRP LOAN#1 559,114.60 276•IRP LOAN#2 137,340.00 Total Long Term Liabilities 929,706.60 Total Liabilities 1,101,182.70 Equity 305-TEMP REST NET ASSETS 88,681.49 320-TEMP REST N.A.-RLF GRANT LOA 745,055.00 330. UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS 932,988.26 Net Income 93 22Z 14 Total Equity 1.859,946.89 TOTAL LIABILITIES&EQUITY 2,961,129.59 HEADWATERS R C D AREA INC RECEIPTS EXPENDITURES January through October 2007 Income 4000 GRANTS 4000.05 GRANTS-FEDERAL 225,735.26 4000.10 GRANTS-STATE 140,398.08 4000.15 GRANTS-OTHER 15,233.22 Total 4000 GRANTS 381 304.54 405 DUES 63,191.57 409 CONTRACT 27,230.89 410 ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 1,20000 415 INT.INCOME-SAVINGS 24,015.35 420 DONATIONS 6,342.00 425 SEMINARSIWORKSHOP8 1,94191 430 CAR WASH INCOME ISSAS 445 TECHNICALASSISTANCE 31,190.54 450 INKIND REVENUE 5,79500 460 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAMS-INCOME 460.05 OTHER FEE INCOME 256.06 460.10 ORIGINATION FEES 5,355.75 460.15 PENALTIES 265.00 Total 460-DIRECT LOAN PROGRAMS-INCOME 5,907.63 465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.05 DIRECT LOANINTEREST INCOME 70,258.80 Total 465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 70,258.80 475-MATCHING FUNDS 2,772.45 480.MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 11,18338 Total Income 632,593.14 EXPenae 5000 GRANT EXPENSE 99,674.67 505 INKINDEXPENSE 5.795.00 516 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM-EXPENSE 102037 515 CONTRACTEXPENSE 160.77486 520 INTEREST EXPENSE 9,789.42 530 DUESIMEMBERSHIP 132133 545 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 311190.54 550 SEMINARWORKSHOP EXPENSE 1,10270 553-CAR WASH EXPENSE 220.25 560 LIBRARY RESOURCES EXPENSE 17.00 565 BANK EXPENSE 65.48 570 TRINNINGIEDUCATION 2,964.4 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES ST5.05 ACCOUNTING 20.00 575.10 AUDIT 1,728.34 ToUI575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 1,746.34 500 TRAVELEXPENSE 566.65 IN-STATE 12.7E6.W 500.10 OUT-OF-STATE 2,08290 500.20 FUEL Small 500.25 MAINTENANCE 17586 - 58030INSURANCE 1,7WOO 580.35 TAXESILICENSES 127.40 To1e1580 TRAVELEXPENSE 18,463.47 545 PER DIEM EXPENSE 1,362.31 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 590.10 TELEPHONE EXPENSE 182.40 590.15 POSTAGE EXPENSE 1,53203 590.20 EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 318.93 590.30 WEB PAGE EXPENSE 1,653.35 590.35 INSURANCEIBONDING EXPENSE 1325761 590.40 OFFICE SUPPUES 6,115.59 599.45 PRINTWGIADVERTISWG EXPENSE 3,67137 590.55 MISCELLANEOUS 1,30982 599.65 BANK FEES 65.75 590.70 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 1,779.89 Total 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 31,889.57 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 605 GROSS WAGES 142,341,06 615 COMPANY FICA 10,471.01 620 COMPANY SUTA 45080 625 EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 6,603.01 630 EMPLOYER MEDWALINSURANCE 10,810.00 635-WORKERS COMP 1,501.70 Total 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 172,089.28 Tole E4Penae 539,371.00 Not Income 93,222,14 1 HEADWATERS R C D AREA INC PROFIT LOSS-LEAD SHEET January through October 2007 ECONOMIC GENERAL& LOAN RESOURCE I ARM AUTO Pemant DEVELOPMENT ADMIN PROGRAMS CONSERVATION I TOTAL BUDGET BALANCE Com MM Income 4000 GRANT$ 4000.05 GRANTS-FEDERAL 79,75000 0.00 0.00 145.985.26 225,73518 463,93300 238,197.74 4000.10 GRANTS-STATE 134,290.85 000 0.0 6037.21 140,30.06 142,91200 2515.94 4000.15 GRANTS-OTHER 47400 14,75922 15,233.22 (15,233.72 Total 4000 GRANTS 214,04885 000 47400 152,002.47 14,759.22 0.00 381,384.54 600,845.00 225,48046 405 DUES 63,191.57 63.191.57 30,00000 (27.191.57) 409 CONTRACT 19,25117 64,99 6,25248 1,66525 27,238.89 35,744.00 6,507.11 010 ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 1,20000 1,200.00 (1200.00) 415 INT.INCOME-SAVINGS 1,523.85 22,521.70 24,045.35 21,82000 (2225.35) 420 DONATIONS 5,04200 5110.00 6,342.00 75.00 (6,ZE7 W) 425-SEMINARS1WORKSHOPS 1,941.91 194191 (IS1191) 430 CAR WASH INCOME 165.18 165.18 (165.18) 435-ANNUAL DINNER 000 000 40-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 30,244.54 432.011 51400 ]1,190.5{ 13,014.00 (18,176,54) 450 IN KIND REVENUE 5,79500 5,79500 (5,795.00) 460 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAMS 0% 460.05 OTHER FEE INCOME 286.88 286.88 35000 63.12 460.10 ORIGINATION FEE INCOME 535575 5,35575 81150.00 2,794.25 460.15 PENALTIES 265.00 265.00 450.00 105.00 460.20 LOAN LOSS RESERVE 010 Total 460 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAMS 5,907.63 590]83 8,95010 3,042.37 065 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 70,256.00 70,250.80 78,164.00 5,90720 475 MATCHING FUNDS 2,772.45 2,772.45 41,54200 W,76955 480 MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 135.00 8,822.62 83.19 4,162.47 11,183.20 3,580.00 (7,623,28) Total loom& 337,430.49 BIM25 105,475.80 101,921.90 14,75922 4.162.47 832,593.14 843,714.00 211,10.83 74.98% Ea9anea 5000-GRANT EXPENSE 99,07487 9067467 274,60201) 174,927.33 505 IN KIND EXPENSE 5,79500 5,795.00 (5,795.00) 510-DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM 7.90 1,01247 1,020.37 539.00 (4111.37) 515 CONTRACT EXPENSE 92,410.81 16,590.71 51]6733 160,774.56 168,630.% 7,855.15 528 INTEREST EXPENSE 9,709.42 9,709.42 9,66400 (125.42) 530 DUESIMEMBERSHIP 212.80 67670 179.53 25710 1,323.33 2]88.00 1,484.87 545 TECHNICALA$SISTANCE 30,676.54 51400 31,190.54 5065000 19,459.48 535 SEMINARIWORKSHOP EXPENSE 93350 169.2() 1,102]0 (1,102.70) 553 CAR WASH EXPENSE 220.25 22025 (220.25) 555-ANNUAL DINNER EXPENSE 000 1 10000 1 Im.w 585 BANK EXPENSE 2]50 37.98 6548 455.00 389.52 580 LIBRARYRESOURCES 17.00 17W 578 TRAININGIEDUCATION 2,355.00 4%.15 13.29 2,860.44 5,75000 , 2,8855fi $75.05-ACCOUNTING 0.00 20.10 (2000) 575.10 AUDIT 637.73 260 27124 816.77 1,728.34 8,37000 4,641.64 575.15-LEGAL 0,0111 1,WD,W 1,500% Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 637.73 2.60 27124 816.77 000 20.00 1,748.34 7,070.% 6,121.56 580 TRAVELEXPENSE 580.05 INSTATE 11,075.91 88.00 531.10 109335 12,76638 16,8700 4,112.64 580.10 OUTOFSTATE 2,543.87 319.11 2,513298 614800 328502 580.20 FUEL 83088 030.00 12W 00 419.12 580.25-MAINTENANCE 17585 175.85 200.00 24.15 580.30 INSURANCE 1]00.00 1,700% 1,14000 (58000) 580.35-TAXESILICENSES 12740 12740 125.00 (2.40) 7ma1580 TRAVELEXPENSE 13.610TS 6800 850.21 1,093.35 2,034.13 18.461.47 25,742.00 7,278.53 585 PER DIEM EXPENSE 1,179.12 07.22 95.97 136231 113000 (232.31) 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.10 TELEPHONE EXPENSE 182.40 102.40 (182.40) 590.15 POSTAGE EXPENSE 983.90 11109 333.43 12353 1,532.03 2,1110.00 477.97 590.20 EQUIPMENT REPAIR 265.00 53.93 310.93 65300 33407 590.25 SUBSCRIPTION EXPENSE 0.00 755.00 755.00 590.30 WEB PAGE EXPENSE 1072.80 3.19 41233 165.03 1,85385 2,791.00 1.137.65 590.35-INSURANCEISONDING 8.226.56 47.15 3,669.85 1,324.00 13,25764 13,892.00 834.36 590.00 OFFICE SUPPLIES 6,41656 303.18 1119586 20019 0111559 5,769,00 (2,316.59) 590.45 PRINTINGIADVERTISING 3165937 12.00 3,671.37 97500 (2,6%.37) 590.55 MISCELIANEOUS 1,013.30 1500 13.28 26824 1,309.02 (1,309.82) 590.60 BAD DEBT EXPENSE 000 000 590.65 BANKFEES 250 6825 68.75 8100 1225 5%.70 MAINTENANCEAGREE 651.30 146 1.02325 103.68 1 1,77988 2,990.00 1,21031 Total 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 2245127 483.57 6,78598 2,184.75 000 000 31,889.57 29,916.00 (1,973.57) 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 605 GROSS WAGES 90.70.46 623.05 381981139 12,015.36 142,341.06 192697.00 5,355.94 615 COMPANYFICA 6809.37 6&72 2,702.21 891.51 10,47181 13,490.00 31018.19 620 COMPANY$UTA 29506 351 107.72 40]9 450.68 459.00 8 32 625 EMPLOYER PENSION 4.0 611.56 4703 1,949.70 600,72 688301 083500 295199 615 EMPLOYER MEDICAL 5,362.33 123.35 3,745.43 1,3%.89 10,618.00 18,258.00 7,638.00 075 WORKERS COMP 941.01 788 397.88 157.93 150470 1,817.00 112.30 Total 600 PAYROLL EXPENSE 10021879 874.34 47883.33 15,09280 0.00 0.00 17208928 236154,00 64,084.74 7286% Total Eapansa 272,72004 2 2'5 43 84152.19 177429.21 000 2,854.13 539,371.00 014,99000 275638.00 68.16% Net Income 81,710.45 6627.83 21,323.61 41 14,759.22 1,30080 93,23214 38]2048 44,515.1{ Accrual Basis HEADWATERS RC&D AREA, INC. Profit& Loss by Class Economic Development January through October 2007 COBG-BEAVERHEAD GTA-BEAVERHEAD Total BEAVERHEAD BEEF BSED-Boulder (BEAVERHEAD BEEF) (BEAVERHEAD BEEF) (ECON DEV) (BIG SKY ECON DEV) Income 4000-GRANTS 4000.05-GRANTS-FEDERAL 000 0.00 0.00 0.00 4000.10 GRANTS-STATE 14,719.22 15,000.00 25,719.22 0.00 Total"DO GRANTS 14,719.22 15,000.00 29,719.22 0,00 405•DUES 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 409 CONTRACT 000 0.00 000 000 420,DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 O00 426 SEMINARSAVORKSHOPS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 445 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Coo 465-LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.06-DIRECT LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Tota1485 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 475•MATCHING FUNDS 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,772.45 480 MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 0.00 0..00 0.00 Ow Total Income 14,719,22 15,000.00 29,719.22 2,772.45 Expense 510•DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM-EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 000 515•CONTRACT EXPENSE 14,400.00 14,400.00 28,800.00 2,500,00 630 DUES/MEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 Goo 0.00 545-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 000 0.00 000 0.00 550 SEMINAR ORKSHOP EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 000 000 560-LIBRARY RESOURCES EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 570 TRAINJNGIEDUCAT10N 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.35 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 0.00 000 0.00 5.35 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05 IN-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 580.10 OUT-OF-STATE 000 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 000 585 PER DIEM EXPENSE DOD 0.00 0.00 0.00 590 OFFICE EXPENSE SNAD-TELEPHONE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.15-POSTAGE EXPENSE 25.97 2.82 28.79 19.10 590.20 EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 0.00 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 690.30 WEB PAGE EXPENSE 0.00 5.33 5.33 2.90 590.35 INSURANCEIBONDING EXPENSE 0.00 48.85 48.85 3395 590.40 OFFICE SUPPLIES 0.00 6.14 6.14 3.36 $90.45 PRINTINGIADVERTISING EXPENSE 293.25 0 D 293.25 350.50 $90.55 MISCELLANEOUS Coo 0 D 0.00 0.00 $90.70 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 4.08 4.08 2.68 Total 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 319.22 67.22 386.44 412.49 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 605 GROSS WAGES 0.00 49714 497.74 226.15 615 COMPANY FICA 0.00 37.70 37.70 16.74 620-COMPANY SUTA 000 197 1.97 0.18 625-EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 0.00 24.88 24.88 11.30 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 0.00 47.36 47.36 21.47 635 WORKERS COMP 0.110 5.77 5.77 _ 4.36 Total 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 0.00 615.42 615.42 280.20 Total Expense 14,719.22 15,082.64 29,601.86 3,19804 Net Income 0.00 42.64 -02.64 425.69 Page 1 of 6 r Accrual Bass HEADWATERS RC&D AREA, INC. Profit & Loss by Class Economic Development January through October 2007 LIMA ASSISTED LIVING MERDI-Frontier Sports MERDI-Slllcon RANCH LAND PACKING (BIG SKY ECON DEVI (BIG SKY ECON DEV) (BIG SKY ECON DEVI (BIG SKY ECON DEV) Income 4000 GRANTS 4000.05 GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 0.00 0,00 0.00 4000.10 GRANTS-STATE 1,529.85 0.47 41,651.35 5,300.00 Total 4000-GRANTS 1,529.85 0.47 44,651.35 5,300.00 405-DUES 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 409 CONTRACT 0.00 0.013 000 0,00 420-DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 425-SEMINARSIWORKSHOPS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 446-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0,00 0 O 000 465-LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.05-DIRECT LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 465-LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 000 0.00 475-MATCHING FUNDS 0.00 0,00 0.00 000 480-MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 0.00 000 0.00 0.00 Total Income 1,529.85 0.47 44,651.35 5,300.00 Expense 510 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM-EXPENSE 0.00 OAO 0.00 0.00 515-CONTRACT EXPENSE 1,227.32 0.00 42.543.20 5,202.74 530 DUESIMEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 545 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 000 0.00 0.00 0.00 560 SEMINARMORKSHOP EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 See-LIBRARY RESOURCES EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0,00 570-TRAINING/EDUCATION 2.04 0.00 0.00 0.00 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 0.00 0.00 50.00 0.00 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 0.00 0.00 50.00 0.00 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-IN-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.10-OUT-OF-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 070 000 585 PER DIEM EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590�OFFICE EXPENSE 590.10 TELEPHONE EXPENSE 0.00 0.0O 0.00 0.00 590.15-POSTAGE EXPENSE 3.29 0.00 43.77 8.31 590.20-EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.30 WEB PAGE EXPENSE 3.42 0.00 8.18 0.00 590.36 INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 25.16 0.00 78.02 0.00 590.40 OFFICE SUPPLIES 25.18 0.00 1942 0.00 590.45 PRINTINGIADVERTISING EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 283.60 0.00 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 2.95 000 1.03 0.00 Total 590.OFFICE EXPENSE 59.90 0.00 434.02 8.31 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 605 GROSS WAGES 12624 0.00 1,317.54 000 616,COMPANY FICA 8.97 000 97.09 0.00 620-COMPANY SUTA 0.51 0.00 2.44 0.00 626-EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 6.31 0.00 65.88 0.00 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 13.75 0.00 132.42 0.00 635-WORKERS COMP 2.32 0.00 876 000 Total 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 158.10 0.00 1,624.13 0.00 Total Expense 1,447.36 0.00 44,651.35 5,211.05 Net Income 82.49 0,47 0.00 88.96 Page 2 of 6 Accrual Basis HEADWATERS RC&D AREA, INC. Profit & Loss by Class Economic Development January through October 2007 Total BIG SKY ECON DEV COMPETITIVE COUNTY DUES ADMIN CRDC LOANS IECON DEV) (ECON DEV) (ECON DEV) (CRDC) (CRDC( Income 4000 GRANTS 4000.05-GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4000.10 GRANTS-STATE 51,481.67 0.00 0.00 5,000.00 6,000.00 Total 4000 GRANTS 51,481.67 0.00 0.00 5,000.00 6,000.00 405 DUES 0.00 0.00 63,191.57 0.00 0.00 409 CONTRACT 0.00 432.00 000 0.00 000 420•DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 000 425 SEMINARSIWORKSHOPS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 445 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.05 DIRECT LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 465.LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.06 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 475 MATCHING FUNDS 2,772.45 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 480 MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 0.00 000 000 0,00 006 Total Income 54254.12 432.00 63,191.57 5,000.00 6,000.00 Expanse 510 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM-EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 000 0.00 7.90 515 CONTRACT EXPENSE 51,473.26 000 0.00 0.00 000 530 DUESIMEMBERSHIP ON 000 000 0.00 000 545 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 432.00 12,284.24 0.00 0.00 550 SEMINARVIORKSHOP EXPENSE 0.00 000 0.00 0.00 0.00 560 LIBRARY RESOURCES EXPENSE 0.00 000 0.00 0.00 000 670 TRAININGIEDUCATION 2.04 0.00 1.54 1.39 5.14 675 PROFESSIONAL FEES 576.10 AUDIT 55.35 DOO 1421 13.21 000 Total 575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 55.35 0.00 14.21 13.21 0.00 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.06 INSTATE 0.06 0.00 39.32 36.38 52.38 580.10 OUT-OF-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 24.25 Total 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 39.32 WAS 76.63 585-PER DIEM EXPENSE 0.00 000 107.22 0.00 1.24 590 OFFICE EXPENSE SOLID TELEPHONE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.15 POSTAGE EXPENSE 74.47 0.00 27.39 34.91 29.34 500.20 EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.30 WEB PAGE EXPENSE 14.50 0.00 28.36 26.24 57.48 590.35 INSURANCEIBONDING EXPENSE 137.13 0.00 23118 206.03 475.83 590.40 OFFICE SUPPLIES 47.96 0.00 26.16 523.91 147.07 590.45 PRINTINGIADVERTISING EXPENSE 634.10 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.56 MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 5.34 1.01 2.18 590.70 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 6.56 0.00 20.30 17.72 50.47 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 914.72 0.00 338.73 809.82 762.37 SOOO PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 1,669.93 0.00 2,578.49 1,901.07 4,350.53 615 COMPANYFICA 122.80 0.00 19380 141.49 299,33 620 COMPANY SUTA 3.13 0.00 9.28 646 17.26 625 EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 83.49 0.00 120.32 95.06 217.43 630 EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 167.64 0.00 213.28 213.05 379.37 635 WORKERS COMP 15.44 0.00 26.02 23.26 51 99 Total 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 2.062.43 0.00 3,141.19 7380.39 5,315.91 Total Expense 54,507.80 432.00 15,926.45 3,241.19 6,169.19 Net Income -63.68 0.00 47,265.12 1,75&81 -169.18 Page 3 of 6 Accrual Basis HEADWATERS RC&D AREA, INC. Profit & Loss by Class Economic Development January through October 2007 CRDC SBDC DISCRETIONARY RETREAT/BOARD DEV Total CRDC CRDC WORKSHOPS (CRDC) (CRDC) (CRDC) (ECON DEV) (ECON DEVI Income 4000-GRANTS 4000.06 GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 0.00 000 0.00 0.00 4000.10 GRANTS-STATE 15,000.00 10,597.96 4,000.00 40,597.95 0.00 Total 4000 GRANTS 15,000.00 10,597.% 4,000.00 40,597.96 0.00 405 DUES 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 409-CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 420-DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 coo 0.00 425-SEMINARSWORKSHOPS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 64191 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 090 0.00 0.00 000 485-LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.05 DIRECT LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 000 0.00 0.00 Total 465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 090 0.00 475 MATCHING FUNDS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 480 MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 0.00 0.00 60.00 60.00 0.00 Total Income 15.000.00 10,597.96 4,060.00 40,657.96 641.91 Expense 510 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM-EXPENSE 0.00 090 0.00 7.90 0.00 515 CONTRACT EXPENSE 0.00 15000 280.20 430.20 0.00 530-DUES/MEMBERSHIP 24.20 0.00 0.00 24.20 0.00 545-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 10,260.30 5,000.00 2,700,00 17,960.30 0.00 550-SEMINAR/WORKSHOP EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 000 0.00 0.00 560 LIBRARY RESOURCES EXPENSE 0.00 090 0.00 0.00 0.00 570 TRAININGIEDUCATION 0.00 0.00 090 6.53 0.00 575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10 AUDIT 0.00 0.00 2.15 15.36 0.00 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 0.00 0.00 2.15 15.36 0.00 5B0-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-INSTATE 0.00 12174 411.77 622.27 0.00 580,10-OUT-OF-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.D0 24.25 090 Total 580'TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 121.74 411.77 646.52 090 585-PER DIEM EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 13.50 14.74 0.00 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.10-TELEPHONE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.15 POSTAGE EXPENSE 0.00 6.10 0.00 70.35 11.00 590.20 EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.30-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 090 2.88 0.64 87.24 0.00 590.35-INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 0.00 1927. 24.62 725.75 0.00 590.40-OFFICE SUPPLIES 0.00 2.02 1.68 674.68 0.00 590.45-PRINTING/ADVERTISING EXPENSE 0.00 0Do 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 332.83 336.02 0.00 590.70 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 1.55 1.31 71.05 0.00 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 090 31.82 361.08 1,965.09 0.00 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 0.00 134.70 162.34 6,548.64 0.00 615 COMPANYFICA 0.00 9.21 1169 461.72 0.00 620 COMPANY SUTA 0.00 0.50 0.66 24.88 0.00 625 EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 0.00 6.73 8.10 32712 0.00 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 0,00 11.75 26.13 630.30 000 635-WORKERS COMP 0.00 266 6.50 84.41 0.00 Total 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 0.00 165.55 215.42 8,077.27 0.00 Total Expense 10,284.50 5,469.11 3,98412 29,148.11 0.00 Net Income 4,715.50 5,128.85 75.88 11,509.85 1141.91 Page 4 o(6 Accrual Basis HEADWATERS RC&D AREA, INC. ` Profit& Loss by Class Economic Development January through October 2007 EOA HOME INCA RHPD CONTRACT NXLEVEL (ECON DEV) (ECON DEV) (ECON DEV) (ECON DEVI S( BDC) (SBDC) Income 4000 GRANTS 4000.05 GRANTS-FEDERAL 39,750.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 40.000.00 0.00 4000.10 GRANTS-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 12,500.00 0.00 Total 4000 GRANTS 39,750.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 52,500DO 0.00 406 DUES 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 409 CONTRACT 0.00 18,202.92 619.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 420 DONATIONS DOD 0.00 0.00 417.00 5,300.00 12500 425 SEMINARSIWORKSHOPS 0.00 15.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,285.00 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 19,984.24 0.00 0.00 0.00 6,492.65 0.00 465-LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.05 DIRECT LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 475-MATCHING FUNDS 0100 000 0.00 0.D0 0.00 0.00 480 MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 75.00 Total Income 59,734.24 18,217.92 619.25 417,00 64,292,65 1,48500 Expense 510-DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM-EXPENSE 0.D0 000 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 516 CONTRACTEXPENSE 5,000.00 3,21000 0.00 0.00 50.00 0.00 530 DUESIMEMBERSHIP 164.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 24.20 0.00 545•TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 000 0.00 0.00 DOD 0.00 550 SEMINARIWORKSHOP EXPENSE 475.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 458.50 560-LIBRARY RESOURCES EXPENSE 17.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 570-TRAINING/EDUCATION 621.11 58.46 000 0.00 1,640.14 25.00 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 576.10-AUDIT 241.99 64.27 2.32 0.00 237.12 0.00 Total 676 PROFESSIONAL FEES 241.99 64.27 2.32 0.00 237.12 0.00 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 550.05 INSTATE 6,32835 208.55 000 678.50 3,19892 0.00 580.10.OUT-OFSTATE 149.87 30.80 0.00 0.00 2,338.95 0.00 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 6,478.22 239.35 0.00 678.50 5,537.87 0.DO 585 PER DIEM EXPENSE 8200 174.94 000 0.00 800.22 DOD 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 590.10 TELEPHONE EXPENSE 150.00 0.00 0.00 ODD 32.40 0.00 590.15 POSTAGE EXPENSE 325.00 97.42 6.74 164 331.83 0.00 590.20 EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 140,00 060 0.00 0,00 125.00 0.00 590.30-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 375.36 120.00 5.64 0.00 433.90 0.00 590.35-INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 3,090.18 958.50 42.00 0.00 2,965.39 0.00 590.40 OFFICE SUPPLIES 2,357.72 275.07 6.36 OAO 2.941.05 76.11 590.45-PRINTINGIADVERTISING EXPENSE 2,247.01 0.00 000 0.00 182.00 0.00 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 136.90 134.08 0.00 332.50 2177 42.69 590.70 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 246.41 69.45 0.00 0.00 23264 0.00 Total 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 9,070.58 1,654.52 60.76 334.14 7,267.98 118.80 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 35,267.27 7,792.50 550.10 0.00 35,676.59 0.00 615-COMPANY FICA 2,647.42 574.03 41.30 ODO 2.720.55 0.00 620-COMPANY SUTA 127.88 27.87 1.61 0.00 101.85 0.00 625-EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 1,322.50 389.60 27.51 DDO 1,784.00 0.00 630 EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 2,871.38 959.57 52.15 0.00 398.16 0.00 635 WORKERS COMP 354.56 109.90 9.56 OAO 331.06 0.00 Total 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 42,591.02 9,853.47 68223 0.00 47012.21 0.00 Total Expense 64,741.12 15,255.01 745.31 1,012.64 56,569.74 602.30 Net Income -5,DO6.88 2.962.91 -126.06 -595.64 7,722.91 882.70 Page 5 of 6 Accrual Basis HEADWATERS RC&D AREA, INC. Profit & Loss by Class Economic Development January through October 2007 OUTREACH-CRDC Total SBDC (SBDC( (ECON DEVI Total ECON DEV TOTAL Income 4000-GRANTS 4000.05 GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 40,000.00 79,75000 79,750.00 4000.10-GRANTS-STATE 0.00 12,500.00 134 296.85 134,298.85 Tota14000 GRANTS 0.00 52500A0 214,048.85 214,048.85 405 DUES 000 000 63,191.57 63.191 57 409-CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 19,254.17 19,254.17 420-DONATIONS 0.00 5,425.00 5,842.00 5,842.00 425 SEMINARSIWORKSHOPS 0.00 1,285.00 1941.91 1,941.91 445 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 3,767.65 10,260.30 30,241.54 3,244.54 465-LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.05-DIRECT LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 000 0.00 0.00 000 475 MATCHING FUNDS 0.00 0.00 2,772.45 2,772.45 480 MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 0.00 75.00 135.00 135.00 Total Income 3,767.65 69.545.30 337,430.49 337,430.49 Expense 510-DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM,EXPENSE 0.00 000 790 7.90 515 CONTRACT EXPENSE 3,447.35 3,49235 92,410.81 92,410.81 530 DUESIMEMBERSHIP 0.00 24.20 212.60 212.60 545 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 000 0.00 30,676.54 30,676.54 550-SEMINARM70RKSHOP EXPENSE 0.00 458.50 933.50 933.50 560-LIBRARY RESOURCES EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 17.00 17,00 570-TRAININGIEDUCATION 0.18 1,665.32 2,355.00 2,355.00 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 7.11 244.23 637.73 637.73 Total 576-PROFESSIONAL FEES 7.11 244.23 637.73 637.73 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-IN-STATE 000 3,198.92 11 075.91 11,075.91 560.10-OUT-OF-STATE 0.00 2,338.95 2,543.87 2,543.87 Total 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 0100 5,537.87 13,61978 13,61978 585 PER DIEM EXPENSE 0.00 800.22 1,179.12 1,179.12 580 OFFICE EXPENSE 590.10 TELEPHONE EXPENSE 000 32.40 182.40 182.40 590.15 POSTAGE EXPENSE 0.35 332.18 963.98 963.98 590.20-EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 0.00 125.00 265.00 265.00 590.30 WEB PAGE EXPENSE 2.47 43637 1,072.80 1,072.80 590.36-INSURANCHBONDING EXPENSE 27.58 2,992.97 8.22656 8,226.56 590.40 OFFICE SUPPLIES 5.29 3,022.45 6,416.56 6,416.56 590.46 PRINTINGIADVERTISING EXPENSE 303.01 485.01 3,659.37 3,65937 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0 D 66.46 1,013.30 1,013.30 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.81 23345 651.30 651.30 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 339.51 7,726.29 22,451.27 22,451.27 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 13920 35,815.79 90,720.46 90,720.46 615 COMPANY FICA 10.05 2,730.60 6,80937 6,809.37 620-COMPANY SUTA 0.58 10243 299.06 299.06 625 EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 6.94 1,790.94 4066.56 4,086.% 630 EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 22.49 420.65 5,362.33 5,362.33 635-WORKERS COMP 4,29 335.35 941.01 941.01 Total 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 183.55 -71 19575 106,218.79 108,218.79 Total Expense 3,977.70 61,149.74 272,720.04 272,720.04 Net Income -210.05 8,395.56 64,710.45 64,710.45 Page 6 of 6 HEADWITERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class January through October 2007 General Administration ADMIN (GEN&ADMIN) Total GEN 8 ADMIN TOTAL Income 409-CONTRACT 64.99 64.99 64.99 415- INT. INCOME-SAVINGS 1,523.65 1,523.65 1,521.3.65 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 432.00 432.00 42'2.00 480•MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 6,822.62 6,822.62 6,822.62 Total Income 8,843.26 8,843.26 8,843.26 Expense 530 DUES/MEMBERSHIP 674.20 674.20 674.20 565 BANK EXPENSE 27.50 27.50 27.50 575, PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10 AUDIT 2.60 2.60 _2.60 Total 575. PROFESSIONAL FEES 2.60 2.60 760 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.06. IN-STATE 66.00 66.00 66.00 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 66.00 66.00 6700 585 PER DIEM EXPENSE 87.22 87.22 87.22 590. OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15- POSTAGE EXPENSE 111.09 111.09 111.09 590.30-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 3.19 119 3.19 590.35- INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 47.15 47.15 47.15 590.40•OFFICE SUPPLIES 303.18 303.18 303.18 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 15.00 15.00 15.00 590.65- BANK FEES 2.50 2.50 2.50 590.70• MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 1.46 1.46 _1.46 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 483.57 483.57 48757 6000 -PAYROLL EXPENSE 606•GROSS WAGES 623.85 62185 623.85 615•COMPANY FICA 68.72 68.72 68.72 620-COMPANY SUTA 3.51 3.51 3.51 626- EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 47.03 47.03 47.03 630•EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 123.35 123.35 123.35 635-WORKERS COMP 7.88 7.88 7.88 Total 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 874.34 874.34 87,734 Total Expense 2,215.43 2,215.43 2,215.43 Net Income 6,627.83 6,627.83 6,627.83 Page 1 of 1 HEADWATERS R C D AREA,INC Profit Loss by Class Loan Programs January through October 2007 CDBGlPIA CDBGIPIA Total ALDC POWELL Other CDBG-PIA CDBG-WFIRLF DEER LODGE CO (LOANS) (CDBG-PIA) (CDBG-PIA) (LOANS) (LOANS) (LOANS) Income 4000 GRANTS 4000.15 GRANTS-OTHER 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 4000-GRANTS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 409-CONTRACT 2,149.60 0.00 3,750.76 3,750.76 0.00 0.00 416-INT.INCOME-SAVINGS 0.00 8,795.61 0.00 8,795.61 3,102.03 0.00 460 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAMS-INCOME 460.05-OTHER FEE INCOME 54.88 0.00 000 0.00 0.00 0.00 460.10-ORIGINATION FEES 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 460.15 PENALTIES 0.00 0.00 O.DD D.00 200.00 0.00 Total 460-DIRECT LOAN PROGRAMS-INCOME 54.88 0.00 0.00 0.00 200.00 0.00 465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.05 DIRECT LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 18,823.71 2,805.28 21,628.99 3,746.79 0.00 Total 465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 0.00 18,823.71 2,805.28 21,628.99 3,748.79 0.00 480�MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Income 2,204.48 27,619.32 8,556.04 34,175.36 7,048.82 O.OD Expense 510-DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM-EXPENSE 89.20 0.00 62.75 62.75 50.58 2,31 516 CONTRACT EXPENSE 0.00 16,596.71 0.00 16,596.71 0.00 0.00 520-INTEREST EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0,00 0.00 0.00 510-DUESIMEMBERSHIP 20.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 31.75 1.21 550-SEMINARIWORKSHOP EXPENSE 3.50 0.00 11,84 11,64 000 0.011 565-BANK EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.DO 9.18 0.00 570 TRAININGIEDUCATION 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.04 0.00 575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10 AUDIT 2.52 0.00 69.74 6974 27.28 0.00 T.W1575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 2.52 0.00 69.74 69.74 27,28 0.00 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05 INSTATE 50,44 0,00 232.57 232.57 6.55 24.25 580.10 OUT-OF-STATE 24.25 0.00 24.25 24.25 61.59 0.00 Total 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 74.69 0.00 256.82 256.82 68.14 24.25 585 PER DIEM EXPENSE 1.24 0.00 15.78 1578 15.79 0.00 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15 POSTAGE EXPENSE 24.84 ODD 38.66 38.66 36.36 1.99 590.20-EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.73 1.21 590.10-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 13.18 0.00 35.59 3559 76.68 3.34 590.35-INSURANCEISONDING EXPENSE 115.70 000 276.36 276.36 609.83 31.94 590.40.OFFICE SUPPLIES 30.79 0.00 68.13 66.13 232.29 4.77 590.45 PRINTINGIADVERTISING EXPENSE 0.00 ODD 12.00 12.00 0.00 0.00 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 1.25 1.25 3.66 0.00 590.65-BANK FEES 0.60 0.00 19.18 19.18 6.38 0.00 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 43.19 0.00 60.01 60.01 175.71 6.16 Total 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 228.28 ODD 511.18 511.18 1,152.64 49.41 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 1,461.77 0.00 4,015.81 4,015.81 6,520.93 442.30 615 COMPANY FICA 101.08 0,00 268.71 268.71 458.72 29.38 620 COMPANYSUTA 5.49 0.00 1.91 1.91 21.65 0.34 26,EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 7306 0.00 200.71 200.71 325.98 22.11 630 EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 131.67 0.00 351.39 351.39 680.93 38.57 635-WORKERS COMP 15.86 0.00 36.76 36.76 69.99 4.50 Total 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 1,788.93 0.00 4,875.29 4,875.29 8,078.20 537.20 Total Expense 2,208.36 16,596.71 5,803.40 22,400.11 9,43860 614.38 Net Income -3,86 11,022.61 752.64 11,775.25 -2,389,78 -614.38 Page 1 of 2 HEADWATERS R C D AREA,INC Profit Loss by Class Loan Programs January through October 2007 JEFFERSON CO EDA-RLF IRP#1 IRP#2 Loan MMRLF MICRO (LOANS) (LOANS) (LOANS) (LOANS) CANS)) Totel LOANS Income 4000 GRANTS 4000.15 GRANTS-OTHER 0.00 am 0.00 am 474.00 474.00 Total 4000-GRANTS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 474.00 474.00 409 CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 000 352.12 0.00 6,252.48 415 INT.INCOME SAVINGS 2,651.07 4,686.69 94,24 0.00 3,192.06 22,521.70 460 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAMS-INCOME 460.05 OTHER FEE INCOME 125.00 57.00 0.00 0.00 50.00 286.88 460.10 ORIGINATION FEES 755.75 3,920.00 68x00 9.00 0.00 5,355.75 460.15 PENALTIES 0.00 50.00 0.00 0.00 15.00 265.00 Total 160 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAMS-INCOME 880.75 4,027.00 680.00 0.00 65.00 5,907.63 465-LOAN INTEREST INCOME 465.05-DIRECT LOAN INTEREST INCOME 8,975.50 24,411.11 2,005.70 0.00 9,4118.71 70,256.80 Total 465 LOAN INTEREST INCOME 7975.50 24,411.11 2,005.70 0.00 9,488.71 70,256.80 480 MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 _63.19 63.19 Total income 17507.32 33,124.80 2,779.94 352.12 13,282.96 105,475.80 Expense 510 DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM-EXPENSE 101.00 527.50 96.76 0.29 82,08 1,01247 515�CONTRACT EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 16,596.71 520-INTEREST EXPENSE 0.00 5,463.96 389.33 0.00 3,936.13 9,789.42 530-DUESIMEMBERSHIP 29.50 41.02 0.00 1.38 54.67 179.53 550 SEMINARIWORKSHOP EXPENSE 72.86 43.05 O.DO 1.47 36.48 169.20 565-BANK EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 28.80 37.98 570-TRAININGIEDUCATION 4.98 7.31 0.00 000 478.82 496.15 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 54.30 47.99 9.43 4.58 3540 271.24 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 54.30 47.99 9.43 4.58 m5 271.24 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05 IN-STATE 6.55 62.81 6.55 0.00 141.38 531.10 580.10 OUT-OF-STATE 61.59 61.59 0.00 24.25 _61.59 319.11 Total 580 TRAVEL EXPENSE 68.14 124.40 6.55 24.25 2112.97 850.21 585 PER DIEM EXPENSE 15.78 15.81 14.54 1.25 '15.78 95.97 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15-POSTAGE EXPENSE 43.63 85.08 2332 10.26 09.29 333.43 590.20-EQUIPMENT REPAIRS 9.50 21.02 0.00 0.00 '.1047 53.93 590.30 WEB PAGE EXPENSE 7450 93.81 26.64 0.69 8792 412.33 590.35 INSURANCEIBONDING EXPENSE 617.16 959.59 304.08 19.76 725.43 3,659.85 59040 OFFICE SUPPLIES 254.19 332.36 25.59 14.89 232.65 1,195.66 590.45-PRINTINWADVERT)SING EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 am 0.00 0.00 12.00 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 4.53 0.00 0.00 3.84 13.28 590.65 BANK FEES 9.29 8.21 3.33 0.78 18.48 86.25 590.70 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 213.17 255.21 45.04 4.53 220.23 1,023.25 Total 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 1,221.44 1.759.81 428.00 50.91 1,368.31 6,769.98 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605 GROSS WAGES 7,257.82 9,228.21 2.943.35 209.44 6,901.76 38.981.39 615 COMPANY FICA 506.55 644.65 196.57 14.67 419 1.88 2,702.21 620-COMPANY SUTA 22.46 30.65 3.46 0.68 21.08 10772 625-EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 362.82 461.29 147.12 10.45 345.16 1,948.70 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 706.45 883.35 257.72 20.05 675.30 3,745.43 635 WORKERS COMP 69.01 87,47 26.32 4.14 83.83 397.88 Total 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 8,925.11 11,335.62 3,574.54 259.43 8,509.01 47,883.33 Total Expense 10,493.11 19,366.47 6,518.15 343.56 14,768.45 84,152.19 Net Income 2,01431 13,758.33 -1,739.21 8.58 -1,48549 21,323.61 Page 2 of 2 1 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class Resource Conservation January through October 2007 BLM AREA WIDE BLM HWY 92 BLM MADISON ED (ELM HAZ FU= (BLM H FUELS) (BLM HAZ FUELS) Income 4000•GRANTS 4000.05-GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 28,738.26 0.00 4000.10-GRANTS-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 4000-GRANTS 0.00 28,738.26 0.00 409-CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 0.00 410•ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 0.00 0.00 0.00 420•DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 430•CAR WASH INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 445•TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 0.00 450-INKIND REVENUE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Income 0.00 28,738.26 0.00 Expense 5000•GRANT EXPENSE 0.00 24,041.25 0.00 605-INKIND EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 515•CONTRACT EXPENSE 0.00 3,423.24 497.60 530-DUESIMEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 0.00 545-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 553•CAR WASH EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 570•TRAININGIEDUCATION 0.00 0.00 0.00 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10•AUDIT 1.57 10.39 0.00 Total 575- PROFESSIONAL FEES 1.57 10.39 0.00 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-IN-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15-POSTAGE EXPENSE 0.00 16.83 0.00 590.30-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 0.00 13.78 0.89 590.35-INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 2.21 104.44 4.09 590.40•OFFICE SUPPLIES 0,75 14.29 1.45 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 6.86 0.00 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 2.96 156.20 6.43 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 0.00 1,044.85 0.00 615-COMPANY FICA 0.00 77.36 0.00 620•COMPANY SUTA 0.00 3.07 0.00 625-EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 0.00 52.24 0.00 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 0.00 115.90 0.00 635•WORKERS COMP 0.00 12.75 0.00 Total 6000,PAYROLL EXPENSE 0.00 1.306.17 0.00 Total Expense 4.53 28,937.25 504.03 Net Income -4.53 .198.99 -504.03 Page 1 of 8 2 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class Resource Conservation January through October 2007 COMMUNITY BLM MADISON Total BLM HAZ FUELS FORESTRY (SLIM HAZ FUELS) (RES&CONSERE) (RES 8 CONSERE) Income 4000-GRANTS 4000.05•GRANTS-FEDERAL 6,424.00 35,162.26 0.00 4000.10-GRANTS-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 4000-GRANTS 6,424.00 35,162.26 0.00 409 CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 0.00 410-ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 0.00 0.00 0.00 420-DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 500.00 430-CAR WASH INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 0.00 450-INKIND REVENUE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Income 6,424.00 35,162.26 500.00 Expense 5000-GRANT EXPENSE 3,897.00 27,938.25 325.30 505-INKIND EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 515 CONTRACT EXPENSE 1,783.71 5,704.55 500.00 530 DUESIMEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 0.00 545•TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 553-CAR WASH EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 570-TRAININGIEDUCATION 0.00 0.00 0.00 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 1.05 13.01 0.00 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 1.05 13.01 0.00 580�TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-INSTATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 580•TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15-POSTAGE EXPENSE 4.06 20.89 0.82 590.30-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 7.20 21.87 0.00 590.35•INSURANCEIBONDING EXPENSE 17.75 128.49 0.00 590.40-OFFICE SUPPLIES 2.81 19.30 0.00 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 6.86 0.00 Total 590.OFFICE EXPENSE 31.82 197.41 0.82 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 171.01 1,215.86 0.00 615-COMPANY FICA 12.89 90.25 0.00 620-COMPANY SUTA 0.67 3.74 0.00 625•EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 8.55 60.79 0.00 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 16.25 132.15 0.00 635-WORKERS COMP 5.12 17.87 0.00 Total 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 214.49 1,520.66 0.00 Total Expense 5,928.07 35,373.88 826.12 Net Income 495.93 -211.62 .326.12 Page 2 of 8 i 3 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class Resource Conservation January through October 2007 DILLON SEWER DYERS WOAD FS BEAR GULCH (RES& SE= (RES&CONSERE) (F S HA ) Income 4000.GRANTS 4000.05-GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 0.00 22,000.00 4000.10 GRANTS-STATE 0.00 5,347.21 0.00 Total 4000•GRANTS 0.00 5,347.21 22,000.00 409-CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 0.00 410-ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 0.00 0.00 0.00 420 DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 430-CAR WASH INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 514.00 0.00 450•INKIND REVENUE 0.00 5,795.00 0.00 Total Income 0.00 11,656.21 22,000.00 Expense 5000-GRANT EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 4,300.00 505-INKIND EXPENSE 0.00 5,795.00 0.00 515-CONTRACT EXPENSE 0.00 15,716.15 784.59 530- DUES/MEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 0.00 545-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 553•CAR WASH EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 570-TRAINING/EDUCATION 0.00 0.00 1.46 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10•AUDIT 0.00 10.07 7.25 Total 575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 0.00 10.07 7.25 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-INSTATE 0.00 1,020.52 0.00 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 1,020.52 0.00 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15 POSTAGE EXPENSE 0.39 2.54 6.43 590.30•WEB PAGE EXPENSE 1.13 6.37 11.45 590.35-INSURANCEIBONDING EXPENSE 15.18 44.55 111.90 590.40-OFFICE SUPPLIES 1.81 6.59 13.55 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.70 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 4.51 8,43 Total 590°OFFICE EXPENSE 18.51 64.56 151.76 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605.GROSS WAGES 94.84 337.59 1,105.87 615•COMPANY FICA 7.00 24.92 82.48 620 COMPANY SUTA 0.38 0.48 3.94 626. EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 4.75 16.87 55.28 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 11.25 33.24 122.69 635-WORKERS COMP 2.58 3.25 13.94 Total 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 120.80 416.35 1,38420 Total Expense 139.31 23,022.65 6,629.26 Net Income -139.31 -11,366.44 15,370.74 Page 3 of 8 4 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class Resource Conservation January through October 2007 FS BSB#2 CO. FS G.LAKE#2 FS G.LAKEI#3 IF S HAZ FUELS) IF S HAZ FUELS) IF S HAZ FUELS) Income L 4000•GRANTS 4000.05-GRANTS-FEDERAL 10,15100 37,529.00 0.00 4000.10-GRANTS-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 4000-GRANTS 10,153.00 37,529.00 =0 409-CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 0.00 410,ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 0.00 0.00 0.00 420�DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 430-CAR WASH INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 0.00 450-INKIND REVENUE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total income 10,153.00 37,529.00 7 00 Expense 5000-GRANT EXPENSE 17,821.37 21,029.92 6,384.83 505-INKIND EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 515-CONTRACT EXPENSE 6,706.84 12,500.98 0.00 530. DUES/MEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 0.00 545-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 553-CAR WASH EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 570-TRAINING/EDUCATION 0.00 0.00 1.69 575- PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 0.00 6.68 p.00 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 0.00 6.68 0.00 580•TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-IN-STATE 0.00 0.00 17.00 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 700 0.00 (775 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15- POSTAGE EXPENSE 1.13 6.63 3.41 590.30-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 0.00 2.82 11.96 590.35-INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 0.00 21.55 56.32 590.40-OFFICE SUPPLIES 0.00 2.93 4..67 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 0.00 7.41 Total 590•OFFICE EXPENSE 1.13 33.93 7777 6000• PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 0.60 273.21 678.96 615-COMPANY FICA 0.04 20.23 51.50 620 COMPANY SUTA 0.00 0.21 2.61 625- EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 0.03 13.66 33.96 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 0.09 25.94 64.08 635•WORKERS COMP 0.00 3.19 5.40 Total 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 0.76 336.44 83671 Total Expense 24.530.10 33.907.95 7,301,80 Net Income -14,377.10 3,621.05 -7,301.80 Page 4 of 8 5 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class Resource Conservation January through October 2007 FS MAXVILLE FS PINTLAR Total F S HAZ FUELS IF S HAZ FUELS) IF S HAZ FUELS) (RES&CONSERE) Income 4000•GRANTS 4000.05-GRANTS-FEDERAL 15,000.00 10,141.00 94,823.00 4000.10.GRANTS-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 4000•GRANTS 15,000.00 10,141.00 94,823.00 409-CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 0.00 410-ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 0.00 0.00 0.00 420-DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 430-CAR WASH INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 0.00 450•INKIND REVENUE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Income 15,000.00 10,141.00 94,823.00 Expense 5000-GRANT EXPENSE 11,875.00 10,000.00 71,411.12 505-INKIND EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 515-CONTRACT EXPENSE 3,174.06 680.16 23,846.63 530-DUESIMEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 0.00 545-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 553-CAR WASH EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 570-TRAININGIEDUCATION 0.00 0.00 3.15 575. PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10•AUDIT 3.92 0.00 17.85 Total 575.PROFESSIONAL FEES 3.92 0.00 17.85 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-INSTATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 07) 0.00 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15-POSTAGE EXPENSE 2.77 1.69 22.06 590.30 WEB PAGE EXPENSE 1.42 0.00 22.65 590.35 INSURANCEIBONDING EXPENSE 15.40 0.00 205.17 590.40-OFFICE SUPPLIES 1.22 0.00 22.37 590.55-MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 0.00 15.84 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 2081. 1.69 288.09 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 199.80 0.00 2,258.44 615-COMPANY FICA 14.79 0.00 169.04 620-COMPANY SUTA 0.21 0.00 6.97 625 EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 9.98 0.00 112.91 630•EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 18.97 0.00 231.77 635-WORKERS COMP 3.85 0.00 26.38 Total 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 247.60 0.00 2,805.51 Total Expense 15,321.39 10.681.85 98,372.35 Net Income -321.39 -540.85 -3,549.35 Page 5 of 8 6 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class Resource Conservation January through October 2007 DEER LODGE FFS TOWNSEND FFS WESTERN MC FFS (FUELSISCHOOLS) (FUELS/SCHOOLS) (FUELS(SCHOOLS) Income 4000 GRANTS 4000.05-GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 0.00 0.00 4000.10•GRANTS-STATE 0.00 750.00 0.00 Total 4000•GRANTS 0.00 750.00 0.00 409-CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 0.00 410•ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 0.00 0.00 0.00 420•DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 430•CAR WASH INCOME 0.00 0.00 0.00 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 0.00 450-INKIND REVENUE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Income 0.00 750.00 0.00 Expense 5000•GRANT EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 505-INKIND EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 515-CONTRACT EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 530-DUESIMEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 0.00 545-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 553-CAR WASH EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 570-TRAINING/EDUCATION 0.00 1.44 0.00 575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 0.00 0.00 2.49 Total 575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 0.00 0.00 2.49 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-IN-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 580.TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15•POSTAGE EXPENSE 1.26 2.61 2.62 590.30-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 0.00 2.40 1.40 590.35•INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 5.20 22.03 13.36 590.40 OFFICE SUPPLIES 0.00 2.63 1.89 590.55- MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 0.00 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 2.01 1.16 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 6.46 31.68 20.43 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605•GROSS WAGES 63.19 134.85 135.55 615-COMPANY FICA 4.80 10.24 10.03 620 COMPANY SUTA 0.25 0.54 0.54 625 EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 3.16 6.75 6.78 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 6.00 12.64 12.87 635-WORKERS COMP 1.87 3.60 1.27 Total 6000- PAYROLL EXPENSE 79.27 168,62 167.04 Total Expense 85.73 201.74 189.96 Net Income -85.73 548.26 -189.96 Page 6 of 8 r 7 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class Resource Conservation January through October 2007 Total FUELS FOR SCHOOLS NRCS RANGE WEED (RES&CONSERE) (RES&CONSERE) (RES&CONSERE) Income 4000•GRANTS 4000.05-GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 16,000.00 0.00 4000.10-GRANTS-STATE 750.00 0.00 0.00 Total 4000-GRANTS 750.00 16,000.00 0.00 409-CONTRACT 0.00 0.00 0.00 410•ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 0.00 0.00 1,200.00 420-DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 0.00 430-CAR WASH INCOME 0.00 0.00 165.18 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 0.00 450•INKIND REVENUE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Income 750.00 16.000.00 1,365.18 Expense 5000-GRANT EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 505-INKIND EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 515•CONTRACT EXPENSE 0.00 6,000.00 0.00 530-DUESIMEMBERSHIP 0.00 0.00 0.00 545•TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 514.00 553-CAR WASH EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 220.25 570-TRAINING/EDUCATION 1.44 6.88 0.00 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 2.49 771.10 0.00 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 2.49 771.10 0.00 580,TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-IN-STATE 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 0.00 590•OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15• POSTAGE EXPENSE 6.49 32.28 25.50 590.30-WEB PAGE EXPENSE 3.80 101.20 0.00 590.35•INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 40.59 821.14 0.00 $90.40-OFFICE SUPPLIES 4.52 138.83 0.00 590.55•MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 4.62 263.62 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 3.17 68.43 0.00 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 58.57 1,166.50 289.12 6000�PAYROLL EXPENSE 605-GROSS WAGES 333.59 7,160.61 0.00 615-COMPANY FICA 25.07 529.45 0.00 620-COMPANY SUTA 1.33 25.47 0.00 625-EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 16.69 357.98 0.00 630-EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 31.51 885.48 0.00 635-WORKERS COMP 6.74 92.10 0.00 Total 6000•PAYROLL EXPENSE 414.93 9,051.09 0.00 Total Expense 477.43 16,995.57 1,023.37 Net Income 272.57 -995.57 341.81 Page 7 of 8 I 8 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC Profit Loss by Class Resource Conservation January through October 2007 WATER COMMITTEE WISDOM All Total RESOURCE (RES 8 CONSERE) (WISDOM SEWER) CONSERVATION Income 4000-GRANTS 4000.05.GRANTS-FEDERAL 0.00 0.00 145,985.26 4000.10-GRANTS-STATE 0.00 0.00 6,097.21 Total 4000-GRANTS 0.00 0.00 152,082.47 409-CONTRACT 0.00 1,665.25 1,665.25 410-ASSESSMENTS-WEEDS 0.00 0.00 1,200.00 420-DONATIONS 0.00 0.00 500.00 430-CAR WASH INCOME 0.00 0.00 165.18 445-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 0.00 0.00 514.00 450-INKIND REVENUE 0.00 0.00 5,795.00 Total Income 0.00 1,665.25 161,921.90 Expense 5000•GRANT EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 99,674.67 505-INKIND EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 5,795.00 515-CONTRACT EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 51,767.33 530•DUES/MEMBERSHIP 257.00 0.00 257.00 645-TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 514.00 553-CAR WASH EXPENSE 0.00 0.00 220.25 570-TRAINING/EDUCATION 0.00 1.82 13.29 575 PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.10-AUDIT 0.00 2.25 816.77 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 0.00 2.25 816.77 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.05-IN-STATE 0.00 72.83 1,093.35 Total 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 0.00 72.83 1,093.35 590 OFFICE EXPENSE 590.15-POSTAGE EXPENSE 0.41 12.15 123.53 590.30.WEB PAGE EXPENSE 0.00 8.01 165.03 590.35-INSURANCE/BONDING EXPENSE 0.00 68.96 1,324.08 590.40•OFFICE SUPPLIES 0.00 6.77 200.19 590.55 MISCELLANEOUS 0.00 0.00 268.24 590.70-MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 0.00 4.87 103.68 Total 590-OFFICE EXPENSE 0.41 100.76 2,184.75 6000-PAYROLL EXPENSE 605•GROSS WAGES 0.00 614.43 12,015.36 615 COMPANY FICA 0.00 45.78 891.51 620-COMPANY SUTA 0.00 2.02 40.39 625-EMPLOYER PENSION EXPENSE 0.00 30.73 600.72 630 EMPLOYER MEDICAL INSURANCE 0.00 61.49 1,386.89 635 WORKERS COMP 0.00 9.01 157.93 Total 6000 PAYROLL EXPENSE 0.00 763.46 15,092.80 Total Expense 25741 941.12 177,429.21 Net Income -257.41 724.13 -15,507.31 Page 8 of 8 HEADWATERS R C D AREA, INC. Profit Loss by Class Auto January through October 2007 AUTO Income 480�MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 4,162.47 Total Income 4,162.47 Expense 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 575.05•ACCOUNTING 20.00 Total 575-PROFESSIONAL FEES 20.00 580-TRAVEL EXPENSE 580.20. FUEL 830.88 580.25. MAINTENANCE 175.85 580.30• INSURANCE 1,700.00 580.35-TAXES/LICENSES 127.40 Total 580 -TRAVEL EXPENSE 2,834.13 Total Expense 2,854.13 Net Income 1,308.34 (see Range Weed Committee Work Plan for more detail) 5. Provide technical assistance to the Forest Stewardship Program in the East Deer Lodge Valley. Responsible Party: Chris Town, Bryan Lorengo, Judie Tilman, Nadine Egeline Completion Date: 12/31/07 Strategy B: Work to identify problems that affect the quality and quantity of both ground and surface water 1. Work with Natural Resource Committee and local watershed groups on water and water storage related issues. Explore relationship with TMDL issues 2. Work with Jefferson County and the USGS to find funding for a ground water quality assessment in Jefferson County. Responsible Party: Judie Tilman, Ken Weber, Rodney Caldwell Completion Date: 12/31/07 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. Page R of I Board of Directors.2007 Plan of Work Strategy D: Support affordable housing r ro p teams and projects to help ensure that low- moderate income individuals/families in the area have atTordable safe, e, and decent housing. b L Continue to provide homebuyer education classes; hold a minimum of 1 I Classes annually. 2. Work with the National Aftitrdable Housing Network to expand the Self-Help Housing Program to other communities in area. 3. Help communities find solutions to identified housing needs. Responsible Party: Judie Tilman Completion Date: 12/31/07 Strategy E: Provide administrative/financial management support including if necessary 501 (c)3 status to projects approved by the Board. Projects that have received approval and will receive assistance in 2007 include: • The Butte Chamber of Commerce • Indian Nations Conservation Alliance • The Canton Church • Townsend Heritage Park • The Butte Center for the Performing Arts • The Grant Kohrs Cattle Drive • The Economic Development Summit Responsible Party: Nadine Egeline, Judie Tilman Completion Date: 12/31/07 Objective 3: Develop and Implement projects that will promote the wise use of the areas natural resources. Strategy A: Promote the quality use and protection of the land through education, wise development and conservation practices. I. Continue and expand hazardous fuels reduction projects in Butte-Silver Bow, Anaconda, Deer Lodge, Granite, Madison, Jefferson, and Powell Counties working with the DNRC, the Forest Service and BLM. 2. Work on Fuels for Schools Programs, both administration of grants and promotion of projects. Work to develop other biomass projects in the area as requested. Work to ensure availability of chips in area to serve biomass projects. 3. Provide monitoring and support for Natural Resource Damage Fund projects approved by the respective counties. Continue work with Project Green. 4. Develop and implement noxious weed management projects in the various watersheds including the statewide Dyer's Woad Task Force and technical assistance for grant(s) for Management and Control of Invasive Species. of Explore p potential of hosting the Governor's Range Tour in the Headwaters area. Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. Board of Directors-2007 plan of Work Page 7 of 14 Objective 2: Expand economic and social opportunities within the region through the wise use and development of human and natural resources. Strategy A: Develop strategies and projects that encourage and support an understanding of the area's cultural heritage. 1. Provide support and if requested financial management of federal funding for the Butte-Anaconda Labor History Heritage Area. Responsible Party, Jim Davison, Lisa Wheeler Completion Date: 12/31/07 Strategy B: Work with counties and communities to identify and address public infrastructure and safety needs through planning, grant writing, and administration. Potential Projects include, but are not limited to: I. Assist the City of Dillon with administration and close-out of its CDBG for sewer expansion in low-income area that is currently on septic tanks and experiencing ground water contamination problems. 2. Continue assisting Twin Bridges in development of an urban revitalization plan, grants for wastewater improvements, or other efforts related to development or clean-up of old Children's Home site. 3. Work with communities involved in downtown revitalization efforts. 4. Assist with the water and sewer infrastructure projects as requested. 5. As requested by local emergency service providers assist with FEMA and/or other grant applications. 6. Work to develop and administer a site specific Brownfields project application. 7. Continue to assist Wisdom Sewer District with grant administration & technical assistance as necessary to complete sewer system improvements. 8. Assist MERDI with the Polysilicon recycling project 9. Assist Lima with applications for construction of an Assisted Living Centex. 10. Assist the JLDC with an EDA Pre-Application for the South Boulder Campus. 11. Examine potential of using plasma arc furnace to generate electricity from land- fills. Responsible Party: Judie Tilman, Lisa Wheeler, local sponsor Completion Date: 12/31/07 Strategy C: Develop Headwater's capacity to serve the region through its State designations as a certified Regional Development Corp., the SBDC, and Microbusiness Finance Corp. Goal: Creation,retention of 40 jobs I. implement the 2007 CRDCEDD Workplan (see attached) 2. Using the BEAR Program, the SBDC, and loan programs examine ways to assist new and expanding businesses especially those producing value-added products. Responsible Party: Deanna Johnson, Lisa Wheeler, Janice Copeland, Rick Edwards Completion Date: 12/31/07 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. Pae 6 of 14 Board of Directors-2007 Plan of Work g s HEADWATERS RC&D BOARD OF DIRECTORS — 2007 Plan of Work GOAL: To Achieve the orderly development, conservation, and utilization of the area's natural and human resources. Objective 1: Strengthen the Board of Directors and Committees. Strategy A. Annually review the dues structure for cities, towns, counties, and conservation districts. Look at methods/programs to strengthen the organization's long-term financially stability. 1. Develop annual budgets that take into consideration the needs to finance existing programs and examine projected needs. 2. Monitor budgets throughout the year. 3. Meet with sponsors. 4. Investigate and develop plans/projects that will have a beneficial long-term financial effect on the organization while furthering its mission & goals. Responsible Party: Mike McGinley, Jim Davison, Bob Andreozzi, Nadine Egeline Completion Date: 12/31/07 Strategy B. Work to fill Board vacancies in a manner that fulfills the requirements of NRCS, EDA, and other major funders. Responsible Party: Mike McGinley, Jim Davison, Bob Andreozzi Completion Date: 12/31/07 Strategy C. Strengthen the organizational structure and the capacity of Board Members. 1. Use the Board Handbook as an orientations tool. Update it as appropriate. 2. Hold a Summer Board Retreat for Planning and Educational u p rpo ses 3. Complete the 5 year update of the RC&D Area Plan and the EDA CEDS. 4. Encourage Board Members to participate in the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corp. Training or other training as appropriate. 5. Work on Leadership Training and strengthening organizational structure. 6. Encourage the Natural Resource Committee to take a more active role in issues atTecting the area's water, forest, and soil resources. Responsible Party: Mike McGinley, Jim Davison, Bob Andreozzi Completion Date: 12/31/07 Strategy D. Work with State RC&D Association and other conservation related organizations on projects of special interest. Responsible Party: Mike McGinley, Ken Weber Completion Date: 12/31/07 Headwaters RC&D Area.Inc. Board of Directors-2007 Plan of Work Page 5 of 14 ' Compliance Statement ' "The Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc.Council agrees that the RC&D Program will be conducted in compliance with the nondiscrimination provisions as contained in Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended,the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987(Public Law 100-259) and other nondiscrimination statutes; namely, Section 504,of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972,the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 and in accordance with the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture(7CFR-15,Subparts A and B) ' that provide that no person in the United States shall,on the ground of race,color,national origin, age,sex, religion, marital status,or handicap/disability be excluded from participation in,or be denied the benefits of,or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity ' receiving Federal financial(or technical)assistance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture or any agency thereof." The Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc.Council agrees that the signing of this document constitutes agreement to comply with Federal laws concerning restrictions on lobbying,a drug-free workplace,and responsibilities for nonprocurement,suspension,and debarment,and State review. The Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc.Council hereby adopts this RC&D Area Plan and agrees to use effectively the assistance provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to realize the goals and objectives outlined herein. tHeadwaa�ers�RC&D Area, Inc.Council,Montana Y` p By: 1 v41M ' 1 Date: ` U ' 1`? C ' Chairperson Attest: rt i J�, �a 'L-Oexy�. Council SecNiary W This action authorized at an official meeting of the Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. Council on September 14,2007. U.S. Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service The State Conservationist hereby acknowledges the attached Area Plan of Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. as meeting the requirements under Public Law 97-98 to receive assistance from USDA. Acknowledged By: Date: /L9-Z6'-Ox ate qqhdlervationist I , I OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR , STATE OF MONTANA BRIAN SCHWF.ITZCR 10, JOHN BoHLINOER GOVERNOR LT. GOVERNOR July 23,2007 ' Mr.Michael J.McGinley,Chairman , Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 305 W.Mercury St. Butte,MT 59701 Dear Mike: ' I am writing in support of the regional planning effort undertaken by Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc.to update its Area Plan for its eight county area. This regional approach to ' planning and development is an important factor in enhancing the economy and conserving the natural resources of your area and the state as a whole. The state has had a very long and positive relationship with Headwaters RC&D and we ' look forward to a continuing relationship working together to accomplish our common goals. Sincerely, BRIAN SCHW ZE Governor , STATE CAPITOL • P.O. Box 20090( • HELENA. MONTANA 59620-0601 ' TELEPHONE: 406-444-3111 • FAE: 406-444-5529 • W69EITE: T W.LIT.GOv I HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT AREA, INC (RC&D)/ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT AREA PLAN ' TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE ' EXECUTIVE SUMMARY................................................................................................. 1 ' SECTION 1: ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT ............................................. 3 Vision.......................................................................................................................... 3 Mission........................................................................................................................ 3 ' Organizational Objectives...........................................................................................3 Organizational Structure ............................................................................................. 3 Boardof Directors.............................................................................................4 ' Resource Committees........................................................................................ 6 StaffSupport .....................................................................................................8 Sponsors............................................................................................................ 9 ' Support for State of Montana Economic Development Goals.......................... 9 CivilRights ............................................................................................................... 10 SECTION 2: THE AREA AND ITS ECONOMY........................................................ 11 General Description of the Area................................................................................. 11 Geographyand Climate............................................................................................. 12 Environmental and Natural Resource Profiles.......................................................... 13 Natural Environment....................................................................................... 13 WildernessAreas............................................................................................. 14 Fishand Wildlife............................................................................................. 17 Water Resources..............................................................................................23 GroundWater..................................................................................................25 LandUse .........................................................................................................25 Environmental Issues ................................................................................................ 34 Background ..................................................................................................... 34 ' Hazardous Wastes............................................................ 35 PoliticalGeography................................................................................................... 36 Population and Labor Force...................................................................................... 37 ' Population........................................................................................................ 37 LaborForce ..................................................................................................... 39 Education.........................................................................................................41 Economy....................................................................................................................43 Income............................................................................................................. 43 EconomicBase................................................................................................ 45 Financial Resources......................................................................................... 51 Historic Preservation................................................................................................. 53 Historic Building and Archaeological Resources ........................................... 53 i TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) PAGE Infrastructure and Services........................................................................................ 57 Solid Waste Management................................................................................ 57 ' Water and Sewer Systems............................................................................... 58 Wastewater Systems........................................................................................ 59 Drinking Water Systems ................................................................................. 61 , Transportation................................................................................................. 61 Highways......................................................................................................... 62 Airports............................................................................................................ 65 ' Railroads...................................................................:..................................... 65 Telecommunications....................................................................................... 67 Utilities............................................................................................................ 67 ' Housing........................................................................................................... 67 Medical Facilities and Services....................................................................... 69 Cultural and Recreational Facilities................................................................ 70 , SocialServices ................................................................................................ 72 Infrastructure Funding Assistance............................................................................. 76 Typical Utility `Enterprise Fund' Assistance Programs..................................76 , USDA Rural Development Programs ............................................................. 78 Other Infrastructure Funding Assistance Programs........................................ 78 Local Debt and Bonding ................................................................................. 79 PlanningActivities.................................................................................................... 80 Keeping the Area Plan Current....................................................................... 80 Description of Challenges and Opportunities........................................................... 81 Area-Wide....................................................................................................... 81 Local Opportunities and Challenges......... ..................................................... 83 ' SECTION 3: PUBLIC PARTICIPATION....................................................................92 Summary of findings by RC&D Program Elements....................................... 92 SECTION 4: GOALS AND OBJECTIVES...................................................................93 Authorized Element—Community Development..................................................... 93 , Authorized Element—Land Conservation................................................................96 Authorized Element—Land Management ................................................................ 98 Authorized Element—Water Quality........................................................................ 99 , SECTION 5: IMPLEMENTATION PLAN................................................................ 100 APPENDIX ' Evidence of Support ii TABLE OF CONTENTS(Continued) ' LIST OF TABLES PAGE Table 1 —Land Area and Population Density by County......................................................12 ' Table 2—Wilderness Acreage...............................................................................................14 Table 3 —Threatened and Endangered Fish and Wildlife Species in Headwaters Region....22 ' Table 4—Major Water Impoundments Greater Than 5,000 Acre Feet.................................24 Table 5 —Land Ownership by State, Private and Federal......................................................26 ' Table 6—Agency Land Ownership by County .....................................................................26 Table7—Wildlife Areas........................................................................................................27 ' Table 8—Agricultural Resources ..........................................................................................28 Table 9—County Profile of Farms 2002 ...............................................................................29 Table 10—Mining Activity in Southwest Montana's Forested Regions...............................32 Table 11 —Federal Superfund Sites.......................................................................................35 Table 12—Population Trend 1990 to 2005 ...........................................................................38 Table 13 —Median Age 1990 to 2005 (Male&Female).......................................................38 Table14—Population by Sex................................................................................................39 Table 15 —Labor Force Statistics—2006 Annual Averages .................................................40 Table 16—Per Capita Personal Income 1990—2005............................................................43 ' Table 18— Southwest Montana Employment by Industry.....................................................45 Table19—Major Employers.................................................................................................46 ' Table 20—Financial Institutions............................................................................................52 Table21 —Historic Places .....................................................................................................53 ' Table 22—Interstate Highway Distances to Major Cities from Butte..................................63 Table 23 —Housing Unit Estimates.......................................................................................68 ' Table 24—Cultural Facilities.................................................................................................71 Table 25 —Services for the Developmentally Disabled.........................................................72 ' Table 26—Community Services............................................................................................73 Table 28— Senior Citizens.....................................................................................................74 ' Table 29—Chemical Dependence Treatment Programs........................................................75 Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan................................................100 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) ' LIST OF FIGURES PAGE ' Figure 1 —Headwaters RC&D/EDD Area's Counties and County Seats..............................11 Figure 2—Montana Wilderness and Roadless Areas ............................................................I S , Figure 3 —Montana's Roads and Roadless Areas .................................................................16 Figure 4—MFWP Stream Fishery Classification..................................................................17 ' Figure 5 —Presence of Myxobolus Cerebralis in Montana.................................................... 18 Figure 6—Arctic Grayling populations in Montana..............................................................22 ' Figure 7 —Bull Trout populations in Montana......................................................................23 Figure 8—Population Distribution........................................................................................37 Figure 9—Regional Population Trend...................................................................................37 ' Figure 10—Educational Attainment of Bachelor Degree or More........................................42 Figure 11 —Montana Per Capita Personal Income by County—2005...................................44 ' Figure 12— SW Montana Employment—Annual Average...................................................51 Figure 13 —Montana Employment—Annual Average..........................................................51 , Figure 14—SW Montana Unemployed—Annual Average...................................................51 Figure 15—Montana Unemployed—Annual Average..........................................................51 Figure 16—SW Montana Unemployment Rate—Annual Avg.............................................51 ' Figure 17—Montana Unemployment Rate—Annual Avg....................................................51 Figure 18—MT DEQ TMDL Planning Area Completion Schedule..::.................................60 , Figure 19—Montana Major Interstates.......................................... 62 Figure 20—Fund Used in FYS 2007—2009 By Improvement.............................................63 , Figure 21 —Proposed Road Improvement Projects for the Headwaters Area.......................64 Figure 22—Air Distances to Major Cities from Butte, MT...................................................65 Figure 23 —Regional Railroad Routes...................................................................................66 i lV ' Executive Summary ' Since its formation in 1973, teamwork has been the driving force behind the success enjoyed by Headwaters Resource Conservation and Development Area, Inc. (Headwaters ' RC&D). Success in any community effort requires the participation and involvement of its citizens. Headwaters, a grass-roots organization initiated and sponsored by legal subdivisions of local government and the conservation districts, expands economic and social opportunities through wise use and development of both human and natural resources. The eight-county Headwaters RC&D area has an abundance of clean air, natural The eight counties represented by beauty, and good water. Although it is rich Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc.,include: ' in mineral, agricultural, and forest resources, Anaconda-Deer Lodge; Beaverhead; the economy of the area has been hurt by the Broadwater; Butte-Silver Bow; Granite; downturns in these basic industries. Area Jefferson; Madison; and Powell County. leaders therefore, are focusing on diversification, including the development of industries related to value-adding to agriculture and forest products, social and human services, and tourism. Problems and challenges exist, and much remains to be done to meet the needs of the people and achieve the objectives and goals of the Headwaters RC&D Area Plan. The sponsors encourage a regional approach to solving cultural, social, and economic problems. ' Headwaters received its designation as an Economic Development District (EDD) in March 1993. In April of 1994 Headwaters was notified that it was approved for an EDA Planning Grant and an Economic Development Planner was hired in October of that year. ' Just as an Area Plan is a requirement for a RC&D Area, a Comprehensive Development Strategy is a prerequisite for designation as an EDD and to qualify public works, economic adjustments and planning projects within the District for EDA assistance. In compliance with the new CEDS guidelines established by the Economic Development Administration's Reform Act of 1998, Headwaters also revised its 2002 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy(CEDS) in 2007. Both the 2007 Headwaters' 2007 CEDS and the 2007 Area Plan provide guidance for local and regional planning processes. They build upon an established process that helps to create jobs, foster stable and diversified economies, improve living conditions, and promote conservation of the natural resources within the eight-county region. ' The guidelines adhered to under this Area Plan include: • Letter from the Montana Governor ' • Headwaters RC&D's Vision and Mission Description of the Area • Organizational Structure • Challenges and Opportunities Headwaters RCAD Area,Inc. I ' 2007 Area Plan Pagel 1 • Public Participation , • Goals, Objectives & Strategies • Approved Projects & Implementation Schedule 1 The Headwaters RC&D/EDD plays a significant role in resource conversation and economic development in southwest Montana. Since its inception, sponsors have sought 1 solutions to local problems. During the early years, most projects were related to agricultural water development and aimed at improving irrigation efficiencies and controlling soil erosion. As the RC&D grew, these efforts diversified and expanded into 1 areas centered on natural resource management and community development. The Headwaters RC&D/EDD assists the USDA, the EDA, and other federal and state agencies in establishing conservation and development priorities for the region. , 1 I 1 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 i 1 t 1 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 2 ' 1 iSection 1 : Organization and Management Headwaters RC&D Area Inc.'s vision, reaffirmed in November, 2006 is as follows: The Headwaters Board of Directors envisions that it will be a leader in the establishment of economic development and natural resource conservation and play a leading role in the i development of priorities for the region and that it will assist with the implementation of programs to address those priorities. iTIUM , Headwaters RC&D Area Inc.'s mission, reaffirmed in November, 2006 is as follows: To improve the economic and social well-being of the region through conservation, development, and proper use of natural and human resources. Organizational i Objectives iThe organizational objectives established by Headwaters RC&D are as follows: i Promote the economic diversification of the area's economy through the wise use and development of human, physical, and natural resources. Work with communities to develop programs/projects that will enhance the i quality of life for residents and visitors. Promote land use policies that serve as a guide for the future and help to combat i urban sprawl, protect agricultural lands, promote affordable housing, and encourage redevelopment. Promote projects that address the reduction of erosion or sedimentation. i Promote the quality use and protection of natural resources through education, planning, and sustainable development and conservation. Work to identify and remediate problems that affect the quality and quantity of iboth ground and surface water. i Organizational Headwaters RC&D/EDD is an independent, nonprofit 501(c) (3), nonpartisan group. i Because public leadership and support are essential for the coordination necessary to develop and implement the Area Plan process, Headwaters RC&D Board members represent city/town and county governments, and conservation districts. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. i2007 Area Plan Page 3_ The Board of Directors oversees the Area Plan process. In addition to the appointed representatives from the above-mentioned sponsors, the Board maintains a committee structure. The Economic Development (CEDS) Committee has representatives from the , local development organizations, private business, the University System, and other interested parties. The Range Weed Committee has representatives from local weed districts, county governments, producers, and land management agencies. The Natural , Resource Committee is composed of landowners, land management agency representatives, and recreational users of public and private lands. This broad representation ensures that viewpoints of all components of the communities are f considered. The Board and committee representatives promote the utilization of local skills and resources in program formulation and implementation. The sponsors are encouraged to appoint representatives to the Board of Directors and ' Economic Development committees that will represent the view of the following sectors: ' • Elected Officials: public leadership is essential for the coordination necessary to develop and implement the Area Plan. ' Private Business Representatives: these members contribute the unique perspective of economic development from a personal level • Economic and Business Development Organizations: these organizations are integral to the efforts to diversify the area's economy Employment and Training Sector: linkage between economic development and labor force skills, community colleges, vocational-technical schools and school- ' to-work programs are crucial • Community Organizations: the needs and concerns of housing and neighborhood associations, special interest groups, historic preservation groups, agricultural or , farming associations, and citizen committees affect economic development Women, Minorities, Aged and Disabled: Headwaters RC&D/EDD's mission can only be realized if the needs of all residents of the areas are appropriately , considered Other: health, education, social services and other professions or special interests must be included in any economic diversification plan ' Board of Directors The Board of Directors consists of one representative from each Conservation District Board of Supervisors, Board of County Commissions, and incorporated town; two ' representatives from each unified government; and the chairman of each resource committee. The Board establishes policies, sets priorities, establishes committees, coordinates activities with other agencies, carries out information programs, and maintains activity documentation. It has the legal responsibility for the overall operation of the nonprofit ' corporation. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 4 ' The Board also has the responsibility for the Area Plan and CEDS process and works closely with the resource committees to facilitate that process. For the process to succeed, the Board utilizes technical and financial assistance available from public and private sources. These sources include federal, state, local governments, foundations, educational institutions, local organization, and major corporations. The Board is comprised of individuals who demonstrate a clear understanding of the area's resources and the needs. With the assistance of staff and committee members, it conducts an overall analysis of the area utilizing current demographic and economic data. The Board, comprised of 29 members, three of whom are executive members, reflects a balance between elected officials (56%) and citizen appointees (41%). tHeadwaters Board members are listed below: ' Executive Board and Board of Directors EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS Appointment Name tRace tGender Affiliation Interest Date ' Mike McGinley Local Government, Chairman w M Beaverhead County Economic Development 2000 Business,Community Jim Davison Organizations, Vice Chairman W M Deer Lode County Underemployed 1992 Bobby Andreozzi Natural Resources, Secrets /Treasurer W M Deer Lode County Urban Forestry 2001 ' BOARD OF DIRECTORS *John Bancroft W M Town of Ennis Local Government 2001 Ruby Valley Neil Bamosky W M Conservation District Agriculture 2005 Broadwater Darrell Baum W M Conservation District Agriculture 2005 ' Health,Low Income, *Betty June Bowls NA F Town of Drummond Human Resources 1989 Madison Conservation Larry Brooke w M District Rural Development 2006 *Suzanne Browning W F Granite County Local Government 2005 Community *Karen Byrnes w F Silver Bow County Development 2005 ' Local Government, Finance,Economic *Ty Cobb W M City of Dillon Develo ment 2001 ' *Russ Connole W M I Silver Bow County Business 2006 Utilities and Private Rick Edwards W M Silver Bow County Industry 2000 Local Government, *Helen Gill w F Town of Deer Lode Education,Community__ 1994 Charles Hahnkamp w M Beaverhead County Agriculture 1989 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 5 Appointment Name tRace tGender Affiliation Interest Date Local Government, Agriculture, Jefferson County Community Gerry Keogh W M Conservation District Organizations 1991 Granite County Jay Krieg W M Conservation District Agriculture 2005 North Powell County Forest Products, David Matmix W M Conservation District Comnumity Service 1991 *Annette McLean W F Town of Twin Bridges Local Government 2006 ' Butte-Silver Bow John Moodry W M Weed Department Local Government 2005 ' Local Government *Dwight O'Hara W M Powell County Business 2003 Local Government *David Olsen W M Town of Lima Agriculture 2002 ' Local Government, *Robert Pierce W M Deer Lode Coun Economic Development 2007 "Terry Ross W M Town of Whitehall Local Government 2002 , Local Government, Agriculture,Economic *Dave Schulz W M Madison County Development 2001 Deer Lodge Valley ' Sharon Scognarniglio W F Conservation District Natural Resources 2005 Local Government, *Ken Weber W I M I Jefferson County Community Or . 2004 tAbbreviations: W—While NA—Native American M—Male t F—Female *Indicates elected public officials or coanly/city officials directly responsible to elected officials. Resource Committees ' The Economic Development CEDS Committee. The CEDS committee provides ' guidance to the Board on matters affecting the Headwaters RC&D's EDD. It assists southwest Montana communities in planning public works projects, coordinates public and private investments, coordinates value-added forestry and agricultural projects, and ' works to develop small businesses, tourism, employment, and other community development opportunities. The CEDS committee serves as the advisory committee for the Small Business ' Development Center (SBDC) and the Regional Revolving Loan Program (RLF). It ' provides leadership to the EDA Planner and works to ensure that its annual plan of work is implemented. In compliance with EDA's final rule, 13 CFR 303.6(a), fifteen members (58%) of the , CEDS committee are private sector representatives representing the main economic Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 6 ' interest of the region. The committee also includes eleven members (42%) representing the community, institutions of higher education, public officials, and private individuals. ' The CEDS (Economic Development Committee) members are listed below. ' ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE: Appointment Name Race Gender Affiliation Interest Date *Rick Edwards Utilities and private Chairman W M Butte-Silver Bow induct 2000 ' *Ty Cobb Finance,Economic Vice Chairman W M City of Dillon Development 2001 Community and *Barbara Andreom W F Anaconda-Deer Lode Economic Dev. 1990 ' Private Business, *Bobby Andreozzi W M Anaconda-Deer Lode Forestry 200 t ' John Bancroft W M Town of Ennis Local Government 2001 Health,Low Income, *Betty June Bowls NA F Town of Drummond Human Resources 1989 *Suzanne Browning W F Granite County Local Government 2005 Community Dev., Karen Byrnes W F Butte-Silver Bow Education 2005 Low Income,Human Lynn Clark W F Career Futures Services 1994 Russ Connole W M Butte-Silver Bow Economic Development 2006 Anaconda-Deer Lodge Economic Dev.,Prof. Jim Davison W M Local Dev.Corp and Education 1992 Labor,Workforce ' Dan Dolan W M Montana Job Service Development 1999 Planning,Economic *Anne Fillmore W F Town of Philipsburg Development 2006 Local Government, ' Helen Gill W F Town of Deer Lodge Public Service 1994 *Patty Hayes W F Madison County Private Business 2007 ' Tom Harrington W M Jefferson County Economic Development 2005 Madison County Economic Dev. ' Sam Korsmoe W M Association Economic Development 2004 Butte Chamber of Marko Lucich W M Commerce Tourism Development 2004 *Milo Manning W M Anaconda-Deer Lode Private Business 2007 Jefferson Local Tara Mastel W F Development Corp. Economic Development 2006 *Mike McGinley W M Beaverhead County Economic Development 2000 *Dwight O'Hara W M Powell County Private Business 2003 Headwaters RC&D Area,,fnc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 7 Appointment ' Name Race Gender Affiliation Interest Date Agriculture,Economic ' *Dave Schulz W M Madison County Development 2001 Butte Local *Jim Smitham W M Development Corp. Economic Development 1994 *Dianna Solle W F Powell County Economic Development 2006 ' *Mike Strang W M Beaverhead County Private Business 2007 ' *Indicates private sector representatives. Range Weed Committee. This committee works to coordinate noxious weed management in southwest Montana. It supports public weed awareness, and the ' development of regional and statewide projects that address noxious weed issues. Natural Resource Committee. This committee addresses issues concerning water ' resources, the fisheries, big game management and landowner relations, forestry, and range condition. A part-time forester works under the direction of the Board and provides technical assistance to the committee on forestry related issues. , Staff Support , Because the Board of Directors and Committees are comprised of individuals with other responsibilities and scheduling constraints, staff members are assigned the task of , conducting the day-to-day functions required to assure the Area Plan's success. These daily operations include collecting and analyzing information on the area's economy, identifying strategy options, preparing detailed implementation plans, and implementing ' project plans. The Headwaters RC&D Board of Directors has the responsibility to ensure that adequate staff resources are available to perform these functions. The Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. staff includes the following positions: , EDA Planner SBDC Director ' Loan Officer Fiscal Officer Administrative Assistant/Housing Counselor , The following persons provide technical assistance to the Board of Directors, ' Committees, and staff: RC&D Coordinator/NRCS RC&D Forester/DNRC—MOU with NRCS ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 8 i Sponsors ' The sponsors of the Headwaters RC&D represent city and county governments, conservation district, and other interested parties from an eight-county area in southwest Montana. They include: Cities/Towns: Counties: Boulder, City of Beaverhead County ' Deer Lodge, City of Broadwater County Dillon, City of Granite County Drummond, Town of Jefferson County ' Ennis,Town of Madison County Lima, Town of Powell County Philipsburg, Town of Sheridan, Town of Conservation Districts: Townsend, City of Twin Bridges, Town of Beaverhead Conservation District Virginia City, Town of Broadwater Conservation District Whitehall, Town of Deer Lodge Valley Conservation District Granite Conservation District Consolidated City-County Govts.: Jefferson Valley Conservation District t Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Madison Conservation District Butte-Silver Bow County Mile High Conservation District North Powell Conservation District Ruby Valley Conservation District Support for State of Montana Economic Development Goals The State of Montana has defined a broad vision of economic development for Montana that includes: • Strengthening and diversifying the state's economy • Increasing the number and quality of available jobs • Geographically dispersing jobs This vision is supported by: • Workforce Development 1 • Technology Development • Marketing and Recruitment • Infrastructure Improvement • Permitting and Regulatory Processes Headwaters has a solid working relationship with the State of Montana, each sharing information and resources in the interest of the common goals of both. Headwaters is designated by the State of Montana as a Certified Regional Development Corp, the Micro-Business Finance Corp. for SW Montana, and the host agency for the Small ' Business Development Center. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 9 Minority representation on the Board is three percent, and women comprise 26 percent of ' the Board makeup. While Headwaters cannot dictate to the local governments whom to appoint, it encourages sponsors to consider appointments of women and minorities when possible. ' Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. is firmly committed to providing services and employment ' opportunities on a non-discriminatory basis. All programs are offered to all persons regardless of race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion, disability, political beliefs and marital or family status. The Board has adopted an Affirmative Action Plan and a Personnel Policy which address equal opportunity and civil rights. ' Headwaters actively encourages women, minorities, and low-to-moderate income individuals to become involved in its programs. Outreach to under-served groups is a ' specific objective of Headwaters programs such as the Small Business Development Center(SBDC), the Regional Revolving Loan Programs, and the First Time Homebuyers ' Education Classes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Commerce (USDOC) prohibit discrimination in their programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, age disability, political beliefs, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative ' means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA's TARGET Center, 1400 Independence Avenue, Room 1006- S, Washington, DC 20250-9876, or call (202)720-2600 (voice and TTY). The TARGET ' Center's fax number is (202)721-2681, and its email address is tar¢et-centera,usda.gov. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 14th and Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (202)720-5964 (voice and TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity employer. i Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 10 ' Section 2: The Area and Its Economy General Description of the Area The Headwaters RC&D/EDD region straddles the Great Continental Divide in ' southwestern Montana. Headwaters RC&DlEDD is named because the district contains the headwaters of both the Missouri River and the Clark Fork of the Columbia River. In analyzing the area, Headwaters has identified the following elements that affect the local ' economy: • Geographic, climatic, environmental, and natural resource profile t • Demographic and socioeconomic data and labor force characteristics Major sectors of the economies and their past, present, and projected contributions to employment, income and revenue Relationship of the area's economy to that of the larger state and region, with particular regard to advantages or disadvantages of location Factors that directly affect economic performance in the area, including: state and local laws, financial resources, transportation costs, energy costs, tax bases, bonding capacities, and land use patterns Other factors that indirectly affect economic performance in an area such as ' housing, health services, schools, public safety, recreations and cultural facilities, and environmental issues related to flood plains, air quality, wet-land, historic preservation, hazardous waste contamination, smart growth initiatives, and Brownfield reuse Figure 1—Headwaters RC&DlEDD Infrastructure of the area including all Area's Counties and County Seats transportation modes, water, sewer, ' communications, and electrical distribution systems 1 Existing plans and planning processes in the region =°WELL were analyzed and, where feasible, incorporated into the Area Plan. These included transportation, land snnpm�rg use, housing, downtown revitalization, air and water quality plans. +mss°mE °eo°°wnre! DEER • EYL llfFEggO„ ' OD Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. is comprised of an eight-county region within southwest Montana. The area has 16,294.75 square miles or 10,770,830 acres. The county seats are: Anaconda (Anaconda-Deer Lodge), Dillon (Beaverhead), Broadwater(Townsend) Butte (Butte-Silver Bow), Philipsburg (Granite), L ' Boulder (Jefferson), Virginia City (Madison), and Deer Lodge (Powell) and are illustrated on the map depicted in Figure 1. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 11 Table 1 provides a breakdown of land area and population density by county. Table 1 —Land Area and Population D nsity by Count Persons Per Persons Per ' Land Area Square Mile Square Mile County Population* (Square Mile) 2000 2005 Anaconda-Deer Lodge 8,948 736.9 12.8 12.14 Beaverhead 8,773 5,542.6 1.7 1.58 Broadwater 4,517 1,191.5 3.7 3.8 ' Butte-Silver Bow 32,982 718.3 48.2 45.9 Granite 2,965 1,727.5 1.6 1.71 Jefferson 11,170 1,656.7 6.1 6.74 ' Madison 7,274 3,586.6 1.9 2.02 Powell 6,999 2,326.0 3.1 3.0 , TOTALS: 83,628 17,486.1 4.8 4.78 *Source: hrto:!/auickfacts.census.eov/ofd/states/30000.html Zkography and Climate The region's topographic features are extreme, ranging from nearly level valleys to ' rugged mountains with peaks reaching over 11,000 feet. The lowest elevation (3590 feet above sea level) is located on Rock Creek in Granite County, and the highest is Hilgard Peak (11,316 feet above sea level) in Madison County. The region is characterized by several broad valleys with elevations above 5,000 feet. More than half the region is steep forest-covered mountains. Most of the valley land is farmed or ranched. ' From one corner of the area to the other, the geography is diverse as are the geologic ' characteristics. According to Roadside Geology of Montana (Alt-Hyndman): "Several of the mountain ranges in southwestern Montana contain large ' areas of continental crust without a cover of younger rocks, enough exposed basement rock to open an interesting window onto the most ancient part of the state's history. The great age of the rocks and the ' inability of geologists to read more than a fraction of the story they have to tell, cloud our view through that window. Low mountains in the interior of the Sapphire block, the Sapphire Range, i consist mostly of Precambrian sedimentary rock, Belt formations, that show relatively little folding and faulting compared to the intensely ' deformed rocks around the margins of the block The Garnet, Flint Creek, and Anaconda-Pintlar ranges define the northern, eastern, and southern boundaries of the Sapphire block. All three ranges consist basically of ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 12 ' tightly folded sedimentary formation of all ages from Precambrian through Cretaceous. The Pioneer Mountains appear to be another detachment ' block similar in most basic respects to the Sapphire block. However, a shear zone resembling the Bitterroot mylonite defining the east side of the Idaho batholith has not yet been found. The broad valley of the Big Hole may, like the Bitterroot Valley, have opened as a gap behind the detachment block. ' The Boulder batholith in the general area between Butte and Helena lies about 100 miles east of where a self-respecting batholith its size should be to fit into the plate tectonics scheme of things. Enormous volumes of the magma of the Boulder batholith erupted to build the volcanic pile that we call the Elkhorn Mountains..." ' Soils found in the Headwaters region include: poorly drained loamy soils, cool loamy grassland soils on benches and fans, cool clayey grassland soils, cool loamy grassland soils on igneous bedrock, cool loamy grassland soils on shale bedrock, cold loamy grassland soils on glacial moraines, cold clayey grassland soils, cold loamy forested soil on igneous bedrock, cold loamy forested soils on glacial moraines, cold loamy soils on ' metamorphic bedrock, and alpine rock land. These complex physiographic features greatly influence the region's climate. Precipitation generally exceeds 50 inches in the high mountains and less than 10 inches in some valleys. The growing season is less than 50 days in the mountains and can reach 130 days in the valleys. I Tnvironmental and Natural Resource Profiles Natural Environment ' The area's wilderness, wildlife areas and pristine water resources create both opportunities and constraints to development. These resources attract visitors and businesses, and are a vital component of the area's economy. Yet their protection is essential to maintain the quality of life of the area. It is an on-going effort to achieve a balance between the protection of the environment and the development of the area's natural resources. ' Land use policies and environmental regulations impact current and future economic development. State and federal governments own over 50 percent of the land in the area ' so resource management decisions at all levels of government have substantial impacts on the area's economy, the quality of life, and the environment. Members of the Headwaters Board of Directors and resource committees monitor legislation that impacts ' the natural environment and maintain an awareness of any potential effects these regulations may have on current or future programs. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 13 1 Wilderness Areas The Headwaters region contains parts of five Wilderness areas. These include the Bob Marshall, Scapegoat, Anaconda-Pintlar, Red Rock Lakes, and Lee Metcalf Wilderness areas. Federal legislation could add additional acres to the wilderness system. Table 2 shows locations of ecosystems in western Montana, including wilderness and roadless ' areas. Table 2—Wilderness Acreage , County Acres Anaconda-Deer Lodge 55,076 Beaverhead 52,104 Broadwater -0- Butte-Silver Bow -0- , Granite 70,580 Jefferson -0- Madison 164,832 Powell 1259,210 Source:httn://mansl.nris.state.mt.us/manner/ ' In 1995, the U.S. Department of Agriculture issued an administrative order protecting ' additional roadless areas, banning mining, oil and gas exploration, logging, and other commercial development within these areas. The administrative order remains in effect until repealed by a Secretary of Agriculture or until it is superseded by an act of ' Congress. Figure 2 illustrates the inventoried roadless areas on National Forest System Lands. Figure 3 illustrates the roads and roadless areas of Montana. 1 t Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 14 ' i 1 Figure 2 —Montana Wilderness and Roadless Areas Montana Wilderness and Roadless Areas I r m i 1 _ ®vre Source. www.wildmontana.orn/maps � i 1 � 1 it 1 i 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 1 2007Area Plan Page 15 o° a e 74 Roads and Roadless Areas w v.u�w .ti nY ry,� a r ♦ � �� � r '` m } Syr l aj i•' y��} :yam a r r .C� a.K; a yy� v� x K y �� a• t• Qj.bl 4 � 'Ka om. � �x b ' f 1r W Montana Roads w n N xw. and "• "'°""'^°' National Forest uan,mv.n�.e.e xo,ae,� Roadless Areas a 1 1 Fish and Wildlife In addition to clear, rushing rivers and streams, reservoirs offering abundant recreation opportunities, quiet lakes and hidden creeks, SW Montana boasts unparalleled landscapes, bountiful waterfowl, and numerous fish species. 1 Nearly 400 freshwater lakes and reservoirs and 1,400 miles of streams provide excellent 1 habitat for a variety of coldwater game fish found in the area. The more common trout species include rainbow, brown, west slope cutthroat, Yellowstone cutthroat and brook. Less common species are gold trout, fluvial arctic grayling and mountain whitefish. 1 Kokanee salmon has been stocked in some lakes and show remarkable growth during their short life span. ' The eight-county Headwaters region contains many miles of both `Blue Ribbon' and `Red Ribbon' trout streams. Such angling preeminence brings people from afar to test their skill in the art of fly fishing. The Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks 1 (FWP) provides a map of the `Blue Ribbon' and `Red Ribbon' streams throughout Montana. That map can be seen in Figure 4. 1 Figure 4—MFWP Stream Fishery Classification MFWP Stream Fishery Classification 1999 Final Sport Fisheries Value Class 1 and II Streams i 1 f FF , it siae.lm r.ATTi(A Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 17 In 2003, 227,562 resident and 200,647 non-resident fishing licenses were purchased in Montana. In 2004, anglers spent an estimated $235 million in Montana on transportation, lodging, food, guide fees, and other direct purchases, excluding license fees. ' According to Montana FWP, "Montana's great fishing is more than a coincidence of climate, geography and geology. Aggressive conservation efforts have resulted in , landmark legislation that protects the habitat in which wild trout and other fish species thrive." Whirling disease, a parasitic infection of trout which attacks the nerves and cartilage of ' younger fish was found in the Madison and Ruby Rivers in 1994. It is considered the greatest single threat to Montana's wild and native trout population. More than 85 bodies , of water in Montana are known to harbor Myxobulus cerebralis (Mc), the microscopic parasite that causes whirling disease. Figure 5 illustrates the presence of Mc in Montana waterways. ' Figure 5—Presence of Myxobolus Cerebralis in Montana MYXOBCLIJS FE Fit EBRALIS DETECTION IN MONTANA BY ' H Y�ROLO GIC l/NIT GOOE LEVEL 8, 9998-2005 eu_ ^ 0.y fl�� ♦ t rt F III�k° a t pXCeCMLC Or MY%OWLVY CCRCOMLI3 ' POairvvE _ 0 40 1 M 10o Wks 1 1 Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 18 ' In 1997, the Whirling Disease Initiative was established by Congress as a national research program with the purpose of "conducting research that develops practical ' management solutions to maintain viable, self-sustaining wild trout fisheries in the presence of the whirling disease parasite." (www.whirlingdiscase.montana.edu/initiativ research has been conducted in Montana and much has been learned about ' whirling disease and the ability to control and/or mediate the effects of the parasite on fish populations. ' Trout Unlimited, area sportsmen and landowners are actively involved in the research and remedies for whirling disease and FWP has maintained a `whirling disease free' status for all of its hatchery facilities. Through a combination of disease-free hatchery ' fish stocks, on-going research and implementation plans, the effects of whirling disease will likely be contained and not permanently compromise southwestern Montana's premier fisheries. Big Game All species of big game animals common to the Rocky Mountains are found in southwest Montana. Rocky Mountain elk are found throughout the mountainous part of ' southwest Montana and their numbers have seen an upward trend since 1975. Mule deer aR, ( abound from mountain tops to river bottoms. e Their primary foods are browse and forbs. Whitetail deer are found mainly along the river bottoms where deciduous trees and ' 7T 1 ,,- shrubs provide excellent habitat. J Scott Wheeler Photography Shiras moose is the largest big game animal found in the Headwaters area. Although they are commonly seen in riparian areas where browse is most abundant, they also range high on the forested mountain slopes. Stable populations exist throughout management districts encompassing virtually all of the eight-county area. Pronghorn antelope are commonly found in the open grassland prairies where forbs and shrubs are a major share of their diet. The greatest concentration of animals occurs mainly in Beaverhead, Madison, and Jefferson counties, although their range extends northward into the Deer Lodge Valley. Black bears are indigenous to all eight counties, and are closely managed by Montana FWP for both hunting opportunities and population ' stability. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 19 Bighorn sheep and Rocky Mountain goats are found in localized portions of southwest Montana. Sheep populations are concentrated in the Madison, Gravelly, and Flint Creek mountain ranges as well as the south end of the Bitterroot Range. Mountain goat ranges ' encompass most mountainous portions of the Headwaters area. The mountain lion, bobcat, and coyote are predators common to the area. Gray wolf ' reintroduction in Yellowstone Park and central Idaho, couple with surviving localized populations elsewhere,has boosted their population in southwestern Montana. Grizzly bear populations are concentrated around the Greater Yellowstone and the ' Northern Continental Divide ecosystems. However, Montana FWP identifies their general range to include portions of all counties in the Headwaters area. t All big game species in the region are actively managed by Montana FWP to sustain proper population levels and promote recreational opportunities. Big game populations in the region are generally stable to increasing for all species due in large part to this effort. Habitat loss remains the most critical threat to these efforts. ' Montana hunters, residents and non-residents combined, spend about $187 million annually on transportation, lodging, food, guide fees, and other purchases, excluding ' license fees. At 24 percent participation, Montana has the nation's highest level of resident hunting. Waterfowl , The eight-county region lies entirely in the Pacific Flyway, as identified by the USFWS. ' Important migratory waterfowl in the area include trumpeter and whistling swans, Canadian and snow geese, common loon, surface and diving ducks, pelicans, and , numerous shore birds. Of these migrants, many reside seasonally outside the area, although resident duck and geese populations exist. Waterfowl are managed cooperatively by the Montana FWP and the USFWS, with the federal inclusion necessary due to their migratory nature. During the spring and summer months, waterfowl nest in the marshlands, along streams ' and lakeshores and nearby uplands. Hence wetlands preservation is critical to these species. Fall hunting is important as a recreational opportunity and economic benefit. The Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, near the Montana-Idaho border, was ' established in 1935 for the trumpeter swan which was nearing extinction. At that time, only 73 swans were known to exist in the area, with 46 of them established in the ' Centennial Valley. With full protection and careful study, their numbers grew rapidly, and they have recently been taken off the endangered species list. The warm springs that feed the upper lakes prevent freezing and nearly 400 trumpeters remain year-round. ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 20 As many as eighteen different kinds of waterfowl nest successfully at the refuge each year. During late August and September more than 50,000 ducks and geese congregate ' on the refuge before continuing their southward journey. The Whistling Swans make their appearance during October, often numbering near 2,000. Along most waterways in the eight-county region, it is common to spot other non-waterfowl species such as osprey, eagles, snipe, curlew, and owls. ' Upland Game Birds Three common species of forest grouse are indigenous to the region: the blue, ruffed, and Franklin grouse. Most of the forest grouse habitat is on timbered lands providing their preferred forage and habitat. ' Sage grouse, the largest of all American grouse species, are most commonly found in sagebrush areas where they feed on leafy materials and other herbaceous plants. Sharp- , ' tailed grouse are found in open upland prairies where native grasses and shrubs provide food and cover. Hungarian partridge and ring neck pheasant are widely scattered, but most commonly found on the upland benches adjacent to cropland. Cold winters and ' heavy snows cause high mortality and limits where pheasants reside. Shifts in land use have been a major cause of pheasant population decline. Chukar partridge occur in limited numbers along the Big Hole River between Melrose and Glen. Some have been sighted new Bear Trap along the Madison River. They have not established themselves well in the area. ' Merriam's wild turkeys have been introduced in localized areas since 1967. Limited huntable populations have been established in Powell and portions of Granite counties, ' and they have been observed sporadically in most other counties in the Headwaters area. ' Furbearers Furbearers, including beaver, muskrat, mink and river otter are present along lakes, ' wetlands, and waterways in the Headwaters counties. Also indigenous to the region are badger and red fox, along with lesser, localized numbers of raccoon. Martens are common in forests, and coyotes are prevalent in all habitats. Threatened and Endangered Species Montana's threatened and endangered wildlife species occurring in the eight-county area are listed in Table 3 on the following page. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 21 Table 3 —Threatened and Endangered Fish and Wildlife Species in Headwaters Region , Threatened Endangered Bald Eagle Gray Wolf ' Bull Trout Black-Footed Ferret* Grizzly Bear Least Tern* Piping Plover* Pallid Sturgeon t Canadian Lynx 1 White Sturgeon Whooping Crane *Improbable in Headwaters RC&D Area ' Source: http://www.fpw.state.mt.uslwildthin eight counties in the Headwaters area are considered critical habitat for the bald eagle ' and gray wolf. Centennial Valley, in Beaverhead County, is a critical habitat for the whooping crane. All counties in the Headwaters region also represent potential or ' transient habitats for the grizzly bear. The wolf is currently listed as ' `endangered' in northwestern Montana under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 and under Montana's own , Non-game and Endangered Species Conservation Act of 1973. Wolves in southwestern Montana are classified as , `experimental, nonessential' populations under the federal ESA. Partners for the Wolf Recovery Plan include the National Ei 1 Park Service, Forest Service, Bureau of s ' Land Management, Department of ° Agriculture's Animal Damage Control Pholo.,FWP(htto:/ifvl.mt.gov/wildthings/tande If to I) ' Division, Montana FWP, and Montana Department of State Lands. Figure 6—Arctic Grayling populations in Montana Substantial information has been ' gathered to support proposals to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to ' list the Montana Fluvial Arctic Grayling (historically found in Beaverhead, Deer Lodge, ' Jefferson, and Madison counties) under the ESA. Montana FWP has responded by working toward ' recovery of the population to avoid the listing. Comprehensive J ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 22 ' management of remaining native populations of arctic grayling in the upper Big Hole River is part of this response. The Bull Trout is currently a threatened s Figure 7—Bull Trout populations in Montana species in Montana. Once ranging throughout most rivers and tributaries west of the Continental Divide, the species is now restricted for angling and an important ' consideration in riparian environmental impact analysis. See Figure 7 for area where Bull Trout are found. w Water Resources Situated at the headwaters of the Missouri and Columbia River basins, approximately ' four million acre feet of water flow out of southwest Montana annually. An estimated two million acre-feet of irrigation water is diverted annually in southwestern Montana. Of this, only 25 percent is used for crop irrigation. The remainder finds its way to the ' ground water table or back into streams and rivers. The Upper Clark Fork River, which has its headwaters in Silver Bow Creek, flows ' through Silver Bow, Deer Lodge, Powell, and Granite counties. Mining over the last 100 years has impacted its water quality. Approximately 20 miles of the Clark Fork and its tributaries are contaminated by heavy metals from mill tailings, and fish kills have ' occurred in the past. Over the years some irrigated lands have been contaminated by heavy metals in the water and rendered unproductive. Cleanup efforts have made strides toward mitigating the problems, but much remains to be done. Reclamation and ' remediation efforts continue to take place under Superfund activities. The Big Hole River has its source in the West Pioneer Mountains in Beaverhead County, ' flowing through the Big Hole Basin into the Beaverhead River near Twin Bridges. Below Divide Creek, 47.2 miles of the river are moderately impaired for coldwater aquatic life due to siltation, reduced flow and habitat alterations. While the river below ' Divide is a designated a "Blue Ribbon" trout stream, prolonged drought has affected the quality of the fishery. The last sizeable population of the Montana Fluvial Arctic Grayling in the lower 48 states is found in the upper Big Hole. 1 The Beaverhead River flows from Clark Canyon Reservoir in Beaverhead County joining the Ruby and Big Hole Rivers near Twin Bridges, where the Jefferson River is formed. ' Below Grasshopper Creek, 44.1 miles of the river are moderately impaired for coldwater aquatic life and recreation due to siltation, temperature, and flow and habitat alterations. The Madison River, a headwater tributary of the Missouri River, is approximately 183 miles (295 km) long. The Madison River rises in Park County in northwestern Wyoming at the confluence of the Firehole and Gibbon Rivers in Yellowstone National Park. It Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 23 flows west then north through the mountains of southwestern Montana to join the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers at Three Forks to form the Missouri River. In its upper reaches in Gallatin County the Hebgen Dam forms Hebgen Lake. In its middle reaches in Madison County, the Madison Dam forms Ennis Lake and provides hydroelectric power. In 1959, an earthquake formed Quake Lake just downstream from Hebgen Dam. The river was named by Lewis and Clark in July 1805, for US Secretary of State James Madison. The Madison River from Madison Junction in Yellowstone to Three Forks, Montana is a fly-fishing mecca for serious anglers Forty water impoundments in southwest Montana have surface areas greater than 40 ' acres and a combined storage of 907,638 acre-feet of water. The largest are Canyon Ferry, Clark Canyon and Hebgen Lake. Major reservoirs listed in Table 4, store 95 , percent of the water in southwest Montana. The remaining impoundments store five percent of the water but are very important to their localities. , Table 4—Major Water Imp oundments Greater Than 5,000 Acre Feet Capacity ' County/Reservoir acre feet Purpose* Owner Beaverhead Bureau of Reclamation Clark Canyon 257,000 FW,I, FC Beaverhead County Red River Water ' Lima 125,000 I and/or Sewer District Broadwater Canyon Ferry 2,051,185 I,P,FW,FC Bureau of Reclamation , Deer Lodge Georgetown 31,042 M,P,W MT Granite County Jefferson ' Delmoe Lake 6,600 I Pipestone Water Users Association Whitetail 6,200 I Whitetail Water Users Association Madison Willow Creek 18,000 I State of Montana—DNRC , Ennis Lake 40,000 I,P PPL Montana Hebgen Lake 386,184 I,P1 PPL Montana Ruby River 1 37,612 I State of Montana -DNRC , Total Acre Feet: 1 2,958,823 *(I) Irrigation,(FW)Fish Wildlife,(FC)Flood Control,(P)Power , 'Note: Power generation application pending. Sources: PPL Montana and DNRC's Water Operations Bureau,April 2002. Lakes and Wetlands ' Headwaters RC&D/EDD recognizes water resources as the lifeblood of the area. Water , sustains a thriving agricultural economy and forms the basis for recreation and tourism businesses. ' The lakes, rivers, and wetlands in the Headwaters region provide a variety of benefits including fish and wildlife habitats, flood prevention, water quality protection, aquifer ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 24 ' 1 recharge, and municipal and industrial uses. To ensure the quality of life in the region, these waters must be protected. Smaller wetlands exist throughout the area in the form of ' small potholes found in agricultural and rangelands. These small wetlands are important to the local ecology and are protected from filling or draining by federal regulations. ' Red Rocks National Wildlife Refuge, located in Centennial Valley, is easily the largest and most recognized wetland in the region. In addition to being a refuge for the re- establishment of the trumpeter swan, a large number of ducks and shore birds use the ' shores of the Refuge. ' Ground Water Threats to ground water increase as high density development takes place outside of ' established water and sewer districts. Older, outdated community sewer systems can also adversely impact ground and surface water. Working to ensure that the wastewater treatment facilities are up to standard and meet the needs of the development taking ' place, will help protect the ground water quality. A study is underway by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine the extent that ground ' water in the Boulder Batholith area of Jefferson County may be contaminated by uranium. This is important for the County Planning Department and landowners in the area relying on well water for domestic use. ' In many of the river bottoms the potential exists to develop large volume wells, 1,000 gallons per minute (GPM) or larger. Depths near 100 feet of consolidated rock alluvium, consisting mainly of sand and gravel, are commonly found in the Jefferson River flood plain and along the lower Ruby and Big Hole rivers. The Beaverhead River, from Dillon to its confluence with the Ruby River, has a similar yield potential. ' Land Use Based upon the changes in land coverage over the past fifteen years, farms (cultivated crop lands) and ranches (range lands) are increasingly being subdivided and sold in urbanized small-acreage tracts. County-wide planning is needed to protect prime ' agricultural lands and to identify areas suitable for housing development. All counties within the Headwaters area have published growth policies plans. In addition Madison and Powell Counties have conducted housing surveys and adopted housing plans. ' An innovative four-county collaborative effort began in 1999 to protect the Big Hole River Corridor. The Big Hole Watershed Committee was instrumental in starting the process that led to all four counties adopting by ordinance a requirement for a 150' set- back from the high-water mark for any development. They have also initiated a 500' ' review process for development to ensure that all state and local requirements are met and open dialogue with developers. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 25 Land Ownership As illustrated in Table 5, the federal government is the largest landowner in the ' Headwaters region claiming 51 percent, private ownership exceeds 42 percent, and the State of Montana owns 7 percent of the land. 1 Table 5-Land Ownership State, Private and Federal County Total Acres Federal, % State, % Private, % , Anaconda-Deer Lodge 473,883 41.6 14.4 43.5 Beaverhead 3,565,691 58.9 10.0 30.6 , Broadwater 792,075 32.6 3.0 60.4 Granite 1,107,977 63.1 1.9 34.7 Jefferson 1,060,620 52.7 3.4 43.7 , Madison 2,305,106 45.8 6.7 47.0 Silver Bow 459,745 51.3 5.9 42.7 Powell 1,491,194 48.8 7.1 43.8 Headwaters 11,256,291 Source: "Montana Geographic Information Clearinghouse"Montana Department of Natural Resources , and Conservation(htM•//nris.mt.gov/gis/requests/couontv own.htlm) Further breakdown of owner agencies can be seen in Table 6 . , Table 6-Agency Land 0 nership by nty BLM BOR FWS FS FWP ' Anaconda-Deer Lodge 5,002 191,930 59,278 Beaverhead 665,331 4,808 39,272 1,373,320 20,475 ' Broadwater 63,812 8,767 185,965 Granite 38,886 660,779 1 Jefferson 96,718 1,603 460,886 3,241 , Madison 250,425 168 805,144 21,296 Powell 82,092 4,377 639,018 10,857 ' Butte-Silver Bow 45,678 190,026 13,846 Headwaters 1,247,944 13,575 45,420 4,507,068 128,994 Source: "Montana Geographic Information Clearinghouse"Montana Department ofNaturat Resources ' and Conservation(htty://nris.mt.gov/gis/requests/county own.htlml) U.S. Forest Service - the U.S. Forest Service administers 4,507,068 acres or about 40 ' percent of the Headwaters RC&D/EDD area. This land is mostly timbered and managed under the multiple-use and sustained-yield concept with due regard for timber, forage, recreation, wildlife, soil, water, and related resources. National Forests in the Headwaters RC&D Area include: Deer Lodge, Beaverhead, Gallatin, Flathead, and Lola ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 26 Bureau of Land Management (BLM) — The BLM owns 1,247,944 acres or slightly above 11 percent of the area. This land is managed under multiple-use concept and lease ' agreements. Much of the land is widely scattered and intermingled with private and state ownership. Uses include livestock grazing, wildlife, soil, water, recreation, and related resources. ' U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) — The FWS administers 45,420 acres and manages the Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in Beaverhead County. ' Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) — The BOR controls 13,575 acres including the shoreline and canal right-of-way on the East Bench Irrigation Project in Beaverhead and ' Madison counties. ' Montana State Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) — 128,994 acres is controlled by the FWP including state-owned wildlife management areas that establish and control winter ranges, calving grounds or security areas, and travel restrictions. These are listed in Table 7. Eight State Parks are found in the Headwaters region. These parks offer camping, ' picnicking, and attractions such as limestone caves, waterfalls, a historic mining camp, and interpretive displays. ' National Park Service (NPS) — Two national monuments are found in the region. The Big Hole National Battlefield, where Chief Joseph fought for the rights of the Nez Perce in 1877, is in Beaverhead County. The Grant Kohrs Ranch, established in the 1860's near Deer Lodge, is the early West's most well preserved and equipped ranch. Table 7—Wildlife Areas ' County Name Beaverhead Red Rocks Lake National Wildlife Refuge (federally owned) Blacktail Wildlife Management Area ' Broadwater Canyon Ferry State Wildlife Management Area Broadwater and Jefferson Elkhorns Wildlife Management Area ' Anaconda-Deer Lode High Rye Game Management Area Anaconda-Deer Lodge & Mount Haggin Wildlife Management Area Butte-Silver Bow ' Madison Bear Creek Wildlife Management Area Wall Creek Wildlife Management Area Rob Ledford Wildlife Management Area ' Butte-Silver Bow Fleecer Mountain Wildlife Management Area Source: USDA Deer Lodge, Beaverhead, and Helena National Forests, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department of Interior and Montana Department of Fish Wildlife & Parks Interagency Visitor Map,Southwest Montana—1987. ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 27 I Agriculture As illustrated by the 2006 data in Table 8 on the following page, agriculture, both crops , and livestock, is a major industry in the eight-county Headwaters region. Food, feed, fiber, forage and oilseed production are a major part of this region's economic stability. Conservation of prime farmland, the best land for producing these products, is essential ' to maintaining the agricultural base of local communities. In addition to crop production, a major agricultural industry in the region is livestock production. Table 9 illustrates the county profile of farms shown on page 29. ' Table 8-Agricultural Resources Livestock and Poultry Selected Crops Hay/ ' Alfalfa/ Cattle& Sheep & Wheat Barley Oats Other County Calves Lambs (bushels) (bushels) (bushels) (tons/dry) Anaconda-Deer Lodge 8,000 500 n/a n/a n/a 12,000 ' Beaverhead 135,926 14,900 534,000 269,000 14,500 142,000 Broadwater 17,300 1 3,500 1,775,000 276,000 n/a 103,200 ' Butte-Silver Bow 6,100 0 n/a n/a 15,000 Granite 21,600 500 n/a 42,000 n/a 24,400 Jefferson 22,900 800 38,000 n/a n/a 43,000 , Madison 76,000 7,100 835,000 150,000 59,000 135,500 Powell 41,000 1,300 n/a 91,000 1 n/a 40,800 ' 2006 Totals 328,826 28,600 3,182,000 828,000 73,500 515,900 Other Crops: Lupine;Dry Beans; Faba Beans;Crambe;Austrian Winter Peas; Garbanzo Beans;Range;Rapeseed;Black Medic;Mustard;Triticale; Sunflower;By-product of Montana's Fuel Crops;peas; Seed Potatoes;Lentils; ' Amaranth;Berseem Clover;Safflower; Cuphea;Flax Source: 2006 Census of Agriculture, Volume I Geographic Area Series, www.nass.usda.2ov/auickstms 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 28 p � � by I s � C a � J b A .r n Table 9-County Profile of Farms 2002 O Number Average of Full- Number Land in Size of Average Total Harvested Number time of Full- Farms Land in Farms Size of Cropland Total Cropland Harvested of Farms Number Farmers time (acres)in Farms (acres) Farms (acres)in Cropland (acres)in Cropland C County 1997 of Farms in 1997 Farmers 1997 (acres) in 1997 (acres) 1997 acres 1997 acres O N Anaconda-Deer Lodge County 83 109 44 58 101,657 134,997 1,225 1,239 21,578 24,891 13,139 13,765 Beaverhead County 360 1 421 1 223 259 1 1,152,008 1,279,031 3,200 3,038 202,965 191,624 142,516 121,179 Broadwater County 219 279 151 185 452,744 469,782 2,067 1,684 130,672 151,432 80,498 81,222 Butte-Silver Bow County 116 155 51 83 100,181 73,792 864 476 14,885 12,055 7,381 6,308 Granite County 117 140 91 83 268,413 282,907 2,294 2,021 45,010 38,532 30,736 27,091 Jefferson County 266 372 128 180 364,153 387,077 1,369 1,041 75,504 70,679 32,607 27,260 Madison County 460 513 316 298 1,079,502 1,028,781 A2,347 2,005 153,658 149,409 97,920 86,278 Powell Coun 230 274 137 177 649,489 618,687 2,258 75,021 77,240 60,495 57,656 Totals: 1,851 2,263 1,141 1,323 4,168,147 4,275,054 13,762 719,293 715,862 465,292 420,759 Source: 1997 Census of Agriculture,Volume 1 Geographic Area Series,USDA http://www.nm.usda.gov/Census A a0 N N b Flood Plains Beaverhead, Anaconda-Deer Lodge, Granite, Jefferson, Powell, and Butte-Silver Bow counties participate in the National Flood Insurance Program. Standardized building codes are followed for structures within the 100 and 500-year flood boundaries. No building is permitted within the actual flood way. Extensive maps delineating flood plain ' zones are available in each county office. Madison County's floodplain management ordinance is based on mapping of`flood prone areas' rather than 100 and 500-year flood boundary surveys. t Forest Land There are an estimated 6,551,300 acres of forest land(including federal land cover) in the , Headwaters RC&D/EDD area. Uses include timber, wilderness, recreation, range, and ' wildlife. Timber species are Ponderosa Pine, Douglas Fir and Lodgepole Pine. Non- timber species include Limber Pine, Whitebark Pine, Rocky Mountain Juniper, Engleman Spruce and Alpine Larch. These trees have been of little importance to the forest , industry, but have had great value to watershed protection, wildlife and recreation. As more emphasis is placed on the economic use of small diameter timber, the importance of these species may change. ' A major concern for the forest lands is the infestations of bugs that have killed pine, fir, and spruce trees throughout the area. SW MT has been particularly hard hit by the pine ' beetle. Headwaters RC&D has active hazardous fuels reduction programs for private landowners funded by the USDA Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. The demand for these programs is great and will continue as long as funding is available. ' The appeals process by groups wanting to halt timber sales has halted much of the proposed logging on federal lands impacted by the pine beetle. Logging restarted in the Butte Watershed in July 2007. Bug killed trees combined with prolonged drought have ' seriously impacted the condition of the area's forest lands and made them ripe for catastrophic forest fires. The USDA Fuels for Schools Program has proven that woody biomass can be used , successfully for alternative energy. Projects within the Headwaters area include: The Philipsburg School System, University of Montana—Western, and the Townsend School ' District. The concern for all those involved in the program is the long-term availability of wood chips and/or pellets. Currently, most sales require a costly and lengthy Environmental Impact Statement(EIS). , Appeals tend to reduce the volume of timber offered for sale. Decreasing timber sales and increasing competition for local sales, contribute to local mill closures. ' Diversification of forest use is needed to offset the declining timber industry. Emphasis on forest products that add value to raw materials and do not require increased timber ' harvest is necessary. Recreation on forest land and the accompanying economic benefits to surrounding communities could be enhanced by opening access and developing and marketing recreational resources. ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 30 ' Weed Management Because they replace more desirable and productive plant species, noxious weeks limit the economic and aesthetic benefits derived from all types of land, including urban lands. ' The following weeds are of major concern throughout the area: Spotted Knapweed, Dyers Woad, Leafy Spurge, Whitetop, Dalmatian Toadflax, Yellow Toadflax, Sulphur Cinquefoil, Russian Knapweed, Diffuse Knapweed, Burdock, Musk Thistle, Common ' Tansy, Field Bindweed, Hoary Alysum, and Houndstongue. County weed boards and weed coordinators draft yearly plans to combat local weed ' problems. Current weed plans include weed prevention and public awareness, weed detection, weed inventories, integrated management practices, and chemical, biological and cultural controls. County programs cooperate with University and Extension scientists in research of plant habitat and new or refined control measures. The RC&D Range Weed Committee works to coordinate area or multi-county weed education and ' management programs. It seeks to build partnerships between state, federal and local agencies, landowners, nonprofit organizations, and special interest groups. Because noxious weeds know no jurisdictional lines, cooperative efforts with neighboring RC&D ' areas are ongoing. The MSU Extension Service's publication entitled, "What is So Dangerous About the ' Impacts of Noxious Weeds?" cites that `all weeds cost Montana farmers over $100 million each year in expenses and crop production losses.' Noxious weeds have an adverse economic impact not only on the agricultural community but also on the ' recreational industry and are known to reduce land values. As the agricultural and visitor industries are two of the primary industries in southwest Montana, weed management efforts are vital to the economic well-being of the area. ' Minerals and Mining ' Mining has a major impact on the economic growth and development of the area. The eight-county Headwaters area is estimated to contain between three and five thousand mines. Three counties in the Headwaters region, Jefferson, Beaverhead, and Madison, ' each have more than 500 claims registered and are also on the list of counties with the most abandoned mine sites. The Headwaters region also contains three of Montana's five active hard rock mines: Golden Sunlight, Montana Resources-Continental Pit, and ' Montana Tunnels. Exploration projects are also ongoing in the region with the greatest potential for new mining ventures coming in the areas of gold, marble, limestone, and gravel. ' An overview of mining activity in southwest Montana's forested regions is illustrated in Table 10 below. 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 31 1 Table 10—Mining Activity in Southwest Montana's Forested Regions Valley Activity Avon Valley Exploration for placer gold in the mountains east, north east and north of Avon and for gold and silver southeast of ' Elliston. Beaverhead Valley Two cyanide-heap-leach operations produce gold, silver, and led in the southern Pioneer Mountains and two open pit ' mines produce talc in the Ruby. Vermiculite was recently produced from an open pit mine in the Blacktail Deer Creek drainage and exploration for gold and copper is underway , there. Bi hole Valley Gold is placer mined in the Trail Creek drainage. Jefferson River Valley A large open-pit cyanide-heap-leach gold and silver mine operates at the south end of Bull Mountain north of Whitehall and an open-cut placer gold operation recently closed in the Highland Mountains. Limestone is quarried in ' the Pipestone Creek drainage and an open-pit chlorite mine operates intermittently south of Silver Star. Madison River Valley Two open pit mines produce talc from the Gravelly Range , southwest of Ennis. Red Rock Valley Gold and copper exploration is ongoing in the Sage Creek ' drainage. Silver Bow Valley Copper and molybdenum mines. Townsend Valley A few placer operations currently produce gold from the Big , Belt and Elkhorn Mountains. Limestone is quarried in the Indian Creek drainage west of Townsend. Several companies explore for gold, limestone, and graphite in the Indian Creek , area. Upper Clark Fork Valley Among the minerals recently mined are gold, lead, zinc, silver, silica, copper, molybdenum, and phosphate. Currently ' exploration is underway for gold, silver, platinum and sapphires. Open-stope, open-pit, placer, and underground mining methods are used. , Upper Ruby Valley Two open pit mines produce talc from the crest of the Ruby Range and exploration for gypsum is ongoing in the Gravelly Range. ' Source:Montana Department of Fish Wildlife and Parks http://flwp.mt.2ovltnsidefwplforestle.eacylpa,eeO2.asp Metals ' The large ore body in Butte made Butte famous as the `richest hill on earth.' Copper ' became the mineral giant and was the mainstay of Butte's active mining operations and economy through most of the twentieth century. The closure of the Anaconda smelter in i Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 32 , it 1980 dealt a blow to the mining industry in southwest Montana. In 2000, citing unmanageable energy costs, the Continental Pit mine in Butte closed and the metals ' mining industry and Butte took another hit. However, things have turned around in the Headwaters region. Commodity prices have experienced a steady and fast-paced rise and the Continental Pit mine reopened in 2004, the Montana Tunnels mine re-opened early ' this year(2007), and Golden Sunlight will be in operation through 2008. Iron and manganese are important to steel production. Several sedimentary iron deposits occur in the area. One deposit southeast of Dillon is estimated to have more than 60 million tons of deposits. Manganese was produced in significant quantities in the Butte and Philipsburg districts in the past though greater demand, increased value, and lower ' shipping costs will be necessary for these mines to reopen. t Uranium veins have been identified in the Boulder Batholith near Boulder, MT and is bedded in tertiary sedimentary rocks of higher valleys. Thorium deposits have been found near Lemhi Pass near the Montana-Idaho border but Thorium's radioactive nature ' requires more atomic energy development before harvesting. Vein or skarn-type tungsten deposits are known to exist in the Butte and Philipsburg districts and deposits of metamorphic rocks are present in the Pioneer and Flint Creek Mountains. Other metals found in the area include aluminum, antimony, arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, platinum, and titanium. These metals seldom ' exist separately, but usually occur as constituents of other ore bodies. Non-Metals ' Sand and gravel deposits are extensive and border all major streams. They are used primarily in construction and for road base materials. ' Deposits of bentonite clays are found in tertiary and cretaceous sedimentary rocks. These clays have a very high shrink-swell potential and serve as an excellent liner in canals and reservoirs. Good pottery clay can be found in the Cardwell area. Major deposits of asbestos-free talc are found in the Precambrian metamorphic rocks in ' the Ruby, Greenhorn and Gravelly Mountains. Vermiculite deposits formed through geologic alterations of Precambrian metamorphic rocks are found in Madison County. Most of the phosphate rock in Montana is located in the Headwater RC&D/EDD area. These deposits in the phosphoric formation of Permian age have been strongly folded and faulted during geologic time. The residuals of former production are being sold, but no ' mining for new rock is being undertaken. Silica, a form of high-purity quartz used in metallurgical processes, is found in ' pegmatites in the Boulder batholith. Deposits are generally small and scattered. Until the ASARCO smelter closed in East Helena in 2001, the Canyon Creek Quarry southwest of Butte was producing and shipping silica to that location. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 33 Ample reserves of decorative and building stones are available, and markets are being developed for export out-of-state. Building stone as described here is used to support ' long-term stable investments. Impacts on the environment from developing the decorative stone resource are considered to be low. Good travertine deposits are found south of Lima; Quartzite flagstone, good for squared ' stone for facing, can be found south of Ennis; and a colorful platy sandstone outcrop is located in the Sweetwater drainage. Orbicular granite, which features egg-shaped patterns when cut, appears in the Deer Lodge area. "Ringing rock" (black intrusives), found on the east side of Homestake Pass, produce a ringing sound when struck and can be made into tourist novelties or decorative rocks. , Commercial quality gems are located in Granite, Madison and Beaverhead counties. ' Sapphires are found in the gravel alluvium along the west fork of Rock Creek in Granite County. Garnets and rubies varying in size have been found in the Ruby and Beaverhead drainages. I'Snvironmental Issues , Background Historic mining and mineral processing operations, centered in and around Butte and , Anaconda, caused the release of substantial quantities of hazardous substances into the Upper Clark Fork River Basin (UCFRB), resulting in extensive injuries to the natural , resources in the area. The UCFRB refers to that portion of the watershed of the Clark Fork River extending from its headwaters, surrounding the city of Butte, downstream to and including the Milltown Reservoir just upstream of the city of Missoula. The Upper , Clark Fork River Basin Restoration Fund was established as a result of a partial settlement of claims asserted in a lawsuit filed by the State of Montanan in 1983 against the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO), (Montana v. ARCO) seeking damages for ' injury to natural resources in the UCFRB. Even though the suit continues, a partial settlement was achieved through a Consent Decree in 1998. The lawsuit does not cover economic harm to private entities. Under the settlement terms, ARCO paid $86 million ' (including $6 million in interest) to the State of Montana to clean up the Silver Bow Creek area west and north of Butte, called the Streamside Tailings Operable Unit. They also paid $129 million (including $9 million in interest) to the State for natural resource ' damages and another$15 million to reimburse the State for all of its costs in bringing the lawsuit. (http://www.doi.mt.goy) Technology enterprises within the Headwaters region have potential for growth. With ' the largest Superfund site in the United States extending from Silver Bow County into Deer Lodge, Powell, and Granite counties, a need for state-of-the-art cleanup , technologies exists. Mining reclamation technology and expertise that could be exported has the potential to create long-term employment. Cleanup efforts combined with land 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 34 use planning may lead to areas being reclaimed for recreation, fisheries, wildlife habitat or economic development purposes. One example of that has occurred in Anaconda where the `Old Works' Smelter site was reclaimed and developed into a Jack Nicklaus Golf Course. ' Development on land within the Superfund site is constrained by federal and state regulations. Property owners within the designated site have capital access problems due to liability issues and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations relative to ' development. Proposed changes in environmental regulations may impact future economic development. State and federal governments own over 50 percent of the land in the area, so resource management decisions at all levels of government have substantial impacts. ' Hazardous Wastes Priority federal Superfund sites are listed in Table 11. The Silver Bow/Butte Addition site stretches 65 miles from the city of Butte in the Upper Silver Bow Creek drainage area through the Deer Lodge Valley. Within the Superfund site there are high priority problem areas that are being or will be addressed over the next several years, including the Berkeley Pit soil contamination in the vicinity of Butte, Walkerville, Anaconda, Warm Springs Ponds, Milltown Dam, and Montana Pole Plant. The environmental ' problems associated with each area are significant and pose threats to ground and surface water and health of area citizens. In addition, there are many unknown factors associated with the Superfund site and new problems continue to surface. ' Table 11 —Feder I Su erfund Sites Remedial Remedial ' Site Interim Investigation/ Design/ Operation Assessment Cleanup Feasibility Record of Remedial and Area (State Wide) Actions Study Decision Action Maintenance ANACONDA X ' Mill Creek X X X X Flue Dust X X X On-Going ' Arbiter Beryllium X X X On-Going Old Works Fast Anaconda X X X X On-Going Regional Water Waste Soils X X On-Going On-Going Smelter Hill X On-Going On-Going Community Soils X X X On-Going BASIN X Basin Town X X X On-Going Basin Watershed X On-Going ' MONTANA POLE(Butte) X X(2) X X On-Going On-Going SILVER BOW CREEK Warm Springs Ponds 1 X X X(2) X On-Going Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 35 Table 11 — Feder I Su erfund Sites , Remedial Remedial Site Interim Investigation/ Design/ Operation ' Assessment Cleanup Feasibility Record of Remedial and Area (State Wide) Actions Study Decision Action Maintenance Streamside Tailings X X X On-Going On-Going Rocker Treatment Plan X X X X On-Going ' Mine Flooding X X X On-Going On-Going Priority Soils On-Going 2 X I X I Negotiations Active Mine Area Non-Priority Soils ' Note: An "X" designates a completed activity (e.g., "X"under the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study category means a Record of Decision has been issued for this operable unit). A number after an"X"or an"on-going"denotes the number of completed or on-going activities for that operable unit. Source: Montana Department ojEnvironmental Quality(httn://d eg.mL2ovIFedSuperfundlfeds.asp) Citizen groups and technical task forces specifically deal with Superfund issues in the area. Members of the Headwaters Board of Directors and CEDS committee members are ' active in these r oups and report on progress and activities. In May 1992 the U.S. Forest Service entered into an agreement with the Montana Bureau gr Y 1 of Mines and Geology (MBMG). Under this agreement, the northern zone of the Beaverhead-Deer Lodge National Forest was chosen to test a process for reclamation , work. Two of the goals of the process were to develop preliminary screening criteria to assist effects of abandoned and inactive mine sites and to categorize sites based on their individual and cumulative effects to other resources and human environment. , As a result of this program, 1,507 abandoned or inactive mine sites were found in and around the northern zone area. Further investigations showed that 99 sites have sufficient , effects on the water, soil and fisheries to be classified as Superfund sites. Since undertaking the abandoned/inactive mine inventory, the Forest Service has engaged in several abandoned mine clean-up programs, including the Highland Mile site in Butte- , Silver Bow county. The Montana Department of Environmental Quality's Air and Waste Management Bureau monitors businesses that currently generate hazardous wastes and receive an EPA identification number. There are no current commercial hazardous waste disposal sites in the state of Montana; however MDEQ maintains a registry of private entities licensed to ' dispose of hazardous waste and materials. Flolitical Geography The counties of Beaverhead, Granite, Jefferson, Madison, Powell, the consolidated ' governments of Anaconda-Deer Lodge and Butte-Silver Bow, the incorporated cities and towns of Boulder, Deer Lodge, Dillon, Drummond, Ennis, Lima, Philipsburg, Sheridan, Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 36 I Twin Bridges, Virginia City, and Whitehall constitute the participating governments within the Headwaters RC&D's area. ' Beaverhead, Granite, Jefferson, Madison, and Powell counties are administered by self- contained governments with typical county functions and organizations. The county ' seats are located respectively in Dillon, Philipsburg, Boulder, Virginia City, and Deer Lodge, Anaconda-Deer Lodge and Butte-Silver Bow counties are unified city/county governments whose administrative centers are located respectively in Anaconda and ' Butte. As citizens of the State of Montana are governed by the Honorable Brian Schweitzer, 1 Governor, State of Montana, and are represented in the United States Senate by Max Baucus and Jon Tester. All counties in the district are contained in the first ' Congressional District and are represented in the United States Congress by Dennis Rehberg. I ' F-opulation and Labor Force Population Based on 2005 population estimates, southwest Montana's population decreased by 1,024 ' persons or 1.3 percent from 2000 to 2005. The population of the area had increased by 4,318 or 5.3 percent during the previous decade (1990-2000) and experienced a decrease in population the decade before that (1980-1990). Figures 8 and 9 below illustrate the population distribution within the Headwaters RC&D region. Table 12 on the following page illustrates the population trends for the eight counties within the Headwaters area. Figure 8—Population Distribution Figure 9—Regional Population Trend - Aeadmten Area — 8.4% 10.7% 89 10.5% e]ff 96 2 8s 13.3% 84 ' 81 SF 82 ■Anazonde Deer-bodge 81 3.5% ■Beaverhead W ■Broadxater ]q 1 ❑Butte-41ver Bow ]g 39.4% •Genite 1990 Cmeue 2000 Crneua Pro1.M2005 a Jeffe1w. .,h ■Mdiron ■Povsll Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 37 1 Table 12-Population Trend 1990 to 2005 ' Estimated Change County 2005 Census 2000 Census 1990 Census 2000 to 2005 ' Anaconda-Deer Lodge 8,948 9,417 10,356 -5.0% Beaverhead 8,773 9,202 8,424 4.7% Broadwater 4,572 4,385 3,318 4.3% Butte-Silver Bow 32,982 34,606 33,941 -4.7% Granite 2,965 2,830 2,548 4.8% Jefferson 11,170 10,049 7,939 11.2% Madison 7,274 6,851 5,989 62% ' Powell 6,999 7,180 6,620 2.5% Headwaters Area 83,683 84,520 79,135 9% Source: Census 200 Redistributing Date(by county),Montana Department of Commerce and Economic Information Center. (http✓/auickfacts.census.eoi/afd/states) Along with a slight decrease in population, the region continues to experience the aging g of its population. As the population grows older, local per capita income becomes ' dependent on transfer payments and increased care for the elderly becomes necessary. e Increasingly, participants m planning sessions point out the need to develop assisted living centers in the rural areas. ' Table 13 shows the median age by county. Table 13-Median Age 1990 to 2005 (Male&Female Change Change ' Increase/ Increase/ (Decrease) (Decrease) County 1990 2000 2005 1990-2000 2000-2005 , Anaconda Deer-Lodge 38.3 42.3 44.9 4.0 2.6 Beaverhead 32.5 37.6 40.7 5.1 3.1 Broadwater 36.4 41.3 45.1 4.9 3.8 ' Butte-Silver Bow 35.9 38.9 41.6 3.0 2.7 Granite 38.5 42.8 45.4 4.3 2.6 , Jefferson 35.1 40.2 42.6 5.1 2.4 Madison 37.8 43.4 45.9 5.6 2.5 Powell 35.9 39.7 42.1 1 3.8 2.4 Headwaters Averages 36.3 40.7 43.3 1 4.4 2.6 Source: Bureau of Census, Census 2000(hnp://ceic.commercestate.mt.us5 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 38 , f fOf the total Headwaters area population of 83,683 people, males represent 50.3 percent of the population by sex. Females constitute 49.7 percent. Table 14 on the following page fdescribes the population by sex for each county. f Table 14—Population by Sex County Male Female Anaconda-Deer Lodge 4,703 4,714 Beaverhead 4,713 4,489 Broadwater 2,236 2,149 f Butte-Silver Bow 17,108 17,498 Granite 1,450 1,380 Jefferson 5,045 5,004 Madison 3,465 3,386 Powell 4,228 2,952 ' 1 Headwaters Region 42,948 41,572 Source: Bureau of Census, Census 2000(httn://ceic.commerce.state.mtus) fLabor Force Nationally, there is a tight labor market. Montana's unemployment continues to fall and is currently at 2%, among the lowest in the nation. The availability of labor in SW MT with the skills required by new employers is becoming more problematic. Typically, f Montana's workforce has been well educated and ranked high in productivity. However, new high-tech industries are requiring specific job skills that may not be available and the need for workforce training has grown over the last five year. In addition SW MT, like f the rest of the State is seeing a shortage in the skilled trades and crafts labor force. Labor costs and the cost of living in the area are relatively low compared to national averages and other localities within the State. The exceptions to this are in the resort areas. fFocus groups have identified the needs for workforce training and the need to develop work force appropriate housing throughout SW Montana. fAs of December 2006,the total labor force in southwest Montana stood at 40,845 people. The number of employed was 39,922 with 1,293 unemployed. The current unemployment rates are some of the lowest in history. Table 15 provides labor force statistics for the area. 1 f f Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. f1007 Area Plan Page 39 1 1 Table 15-Labor Force Statistics-2006 Annual Averages Labor Unemployment County Force Em to ed Unemplo ed Rate Anaconda-Deer Lodge ' 2006 3,915 3,744 171 4.4% 2000 3,985 3,659 326 8.2% 1990 4,317 3,968 349 8.1% Beaverhead 2006 4.964 4,843 131 2.4% , 2000 5,071 4,873 198 3.9% 1990 4,356 4,169 187 4.3% Broadwater ' 2006 2,288 2,220 68 3.0% 2000 2,148 2,049 99 4.6% 1990 1,333 1,251 82 6.2% ' Butte-Silver Bow 2006 17,370 17,194 536 3.0% 2000 17,260 16,217 1043 6.0% 1990 13,561 12,599 1002 7.4% Granite 2006 1,992 1,886 106 5.4% 2000 1,220 1,125 95 7.8% 1990 1,318 1,218 100 6.6% Jefferson 2006 5,696 5,539 157 2.8% , 2000 5,250 4,982 268 5.1% 1990 5,818 5,611 207 3.6% , Madison 2006 4,266 4,170 96 2.3% 2000 3,972 3,813 159 4.0% ' 1990 2,967 2,858 109 3.7% Powell 2006 2,642 2,546 96 3.6% 2000 2,562 2,438 124 4.8% 1990 2,918 5,765 153 5.2% Sources: 1000 and 2001 Montana Labor Market Information, Montana Department of Labor and Industry, Research & Analysis Bureau. Also, "Montana Statistics in Brief," Helena. 1990 Census, Summary Population and Housing Characteristics. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 40 ' ' Education The region is home to two colleges. The University of Montana Western in Dillon is a liberal arts college offering Bachelor and ' Associate degrees. Western recently implemented an innovative block schedule system called `Experience One' where students ' take one class at a time for 18 days then move on to the next class. `Experience One' class delivery has met with incredible success and Western is seeing an increase in registered students. (www.umwestem.edul University of Montana—Western Dillon,MT(http://www.umwestern.edu.) ' The University of Montana at Montana Tech in Butte is a top-ten nationally ranked engineering school that also offers undergraduate and graduate programs oriented toward business and industry. Montana Tech is expanding ' its range of courses in the humanities and social sciences and has recently implemented one of the first in the ' nation, four-year healthcare informatics curriculum. Tech continues to partner with St. James' Healthcare to provide ' additional training and opportunities in the healthcare industry. Figure 10 on Montana Tech lJ ofM the following page illustrates the percent ' Butte,MT(http://www.mtech.edu.) of the county population that has attained a bachelor degree or higher. (www.mtech.edul Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 41 Figure 10—Educational Attainment of Bachelor Degree or More CENSUS 2000: MONTANA ' Educational Attainment of Bachelor Degree or More-Percent of Population 25 Years& Over Montana Average: 24.4% 88� Gla<,er bharcy Using AIWA% ' Flathead 16.6% Tode 175% HI I7A% Phtlire Valle/ T1.4% 166% 21.0% 17.1% i6.]°b Rooseva't PordeFa 15.6% 196% T­ , °pct",:: Ri,hland ' Sentlers Lafie p.5% NtCane of % 155•/. 22?°% i6A% Fergus Carson 21,5% 19.1% Garfield 16.1% .w0 v ludth Petrdeurn 16.8% ] Mrs, Clan. Ea en 17A% nun 31.6% D36 9�e RMeeu t = B.T6,r Alusselsh0l 1].6% Gremte Gal. 16.7% ' 72.1% JeBersoh Veaei Treataue Oyster Revell, y,7% wr 226% 5- 9 hoes, gone, B5W Galaon Gass 25A% 2{,D%_ 41.0°/ re Pow16 Rra Pe k u Rr BeaerheaE Na015on 23A%:�i Cabon 26.4% x5.s% 21.3% tna.ae.a4 mal%,ab,n.,5ex,e ro ure ngnevx..tor.e caws m„P/e,ed n.'.0tee s,.,e Perc erH of Popul ation that has cane ngnes We/MxmoY9'°^'Fkme ' Bachelor Degree or Higher - 15,0%of Less 51%.20.0% obaaa '0.1%-25.0% 50 25 0 50 100 wrenOwn:emcmm«u Miles an e.vanws,am.,.al saugosos '5.1%-30.0% r $Wi 2110 x@z,naml. ' ftl.a lenbaerem1z Wte than 30.0% nnrom 'F.. 17%I 8'u[b Il8 bhVe&,p4 Q.an ID4l 91nenryflh 3If I1,0R2 ROflr tl&IYbGBIX41 chs-sal Montana Tech's satellite campus, the ' College of Technology offers occupational-specific and related ' instruction to prepare students for employment. One and two year programs award certificates and associate of applied ' science degrees. Training is focused on four practical skill areas: business, health, ' technical and industrial. (www.mtech.edu) The U of M Division of Technology ' Butte,Montana(http://w .mtech.edu.) 1 The Anaconda Job Corps, a no-cost education and vocational training program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor, provides alternative educational and vocational training opportunities for youth aged 16-24. Students at the Anaconda Job Corps learn trade skills in a variety of areas including: welding, business/clerical, Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 42 ' i icarpentry, construction equipment mechanics, bricklaying, or culinary arts. Job Corps projects such as picnic pavilions and park concession and restroom facilities, can be ifound throughout the Headwaters region. (www.iobcorps.dol.gov ) i i The economic base of the Headwaters RC&D area depends on resource industries. Economic conditions follow the cycles which historically affect mineral, timber and agricultural demands. National and international factors influence the demand for local i products. Industries must rely on new technology, further mechanization and increased productivity to stay competitive. Economic diversification is necessary to a healthy economy. iIncome Montana was fairly insulated against some of the economic setbacks experienced by i much of the country after 9/11. As mentioned before, the unemployment in Montana is among the lowest in the country. Additionally, the per capita income (PCI) for the ' Headwaters area has increased,though five of the eight counties in the area have PCI's less than the state average. Powell County has the lowest PCI at$21,624 while Butte- Silver Bow has the highest PCI in the region at$31,324. Table 16 illustrates the income trends over the last 15 years. Per capita income is derived by dividing the total personal income of an area by its total population. Figure 11 on the following page shows the per capita income by county. The result is the average amount of income per resident, iincluding residents of all ages. Table 16— Per Capita Personal Income 1990—2005 i County 1990 2000 2005 Anaconda-Deer Lodge $12,439 $20,020 $23,945 i Beaverhead $14,698 $21,416 $27,382 Broadwater $13,419 $19,326 $24,398 Butte-Silver Bow $15,584 $22,690 $31,324 i Granite $14,013 $19,324 $24,945 Jefferson $17,021 $24,989 $29,488 i Madison $13,380 $19,702 $27,181 Powell $12,954 $17,613 $21,624 Source: Bureau of Economic Anal ysis(htt n://ceic.mi.eovBEACouutvData.asn! i 1 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. i2007Area Plan Page 43 1 Figure 11 —Montana Per Capita Personal Income by County—2005 1 Montana Per Capita Personal Income` by County -2005 u,mn Uz« Teele S]H.$a S21,TM 7I 4 Sz1.Ml fm.fef 6,4 S iOa S2�.Na Waits ,, $228,471 �a/• sa,e<,a ch... ' k- LA. \ TNe _ .... y�,NO � 41d.Nne 520,1N (21,728 I ?10,681 - $Tr .,' S25,224 _.i,wa `'7x -ice taws r GM1eld � � ❑.k .. aIEN LP41<M f$O.tN Sb1,161 '57 '—' P wd - Crerd =,az4 +ax<r a an sua.19eS 2 S2A,185 - �m<an` 5 2.1.M,21.ee0tl2 zaeS2 s 1 1 RawWt i[7,m cuan 114.7N n 5hw1529, Ge.i I� S]],216 da1216 Bw? i 1 yr4.% 52$482 ' j 6�J 8,Hain F^WV Mw yyS,IDO Pak 520,0% 1Z;1211 B MaE k`aion '..f21,74 G,Cm 532 m,ae1 ,181 Per Capita } Personal Income <akd.iM ssm<PS<mal n<ome din<i<dae<h d.d+<n..<e aaa<e nyne F.rk PWaWM Nm. $20'000-$22'499 ai'.an. env en crone P«smei n.am<.8e4uus nw cw<ua ev<euven,wa mur<ar P4d<aM $22,500-$24.989 ' $25,000-87.499 Montana Average Per Capita Personal Income is$29,016 caa'.,:,:l eoan..x nwnnwc,d. uad.a..w.mwaconww.< $27,500-$29.999 DI S.P.M1 w<.x<w.<wrssn»asm .wean-nw.con a.klpnala, -$30,000.,Mora 9ua:n<pa<IFwas ManWls aWna.4w dEeanmk.YQ.KV S..TMn.Ya Cmnwa.fHIS.9]]. _ kd H41.PnC�wnugwf.da ' Source: Regional Economic Information System, Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce httD://celc.rnt zoy/FraDbicyData Mans1PerCanrta1ncomeO5.pif , Table 17 shows the 2004 median household income (MHI) figures. The MHI ranges from the high in Jefferson County to a low in Anaconda-Deer Lodge County. Montana's statewide MHI in 2004 was $35,574, and the national was $44,334. Table 17. Median Household Income 2000-2004 ' County 2000 2004 Anaconda-Deer Lod $30 Lodge $26 305 ,155 Beaverhead $28,962 $33,153 ' Broadwater $32,689 $35,899 Butte-Silver Bow $30,402 $33,502 ' Granite $27,813 $31,883 Jefferson $41,506 $47,513 ' Madison $30,233 $34,177 Powell $30.625 $31,254 Average MHI within the ' Headwaters RC&D/EDD: $38,180 34,692 Source: U.S. Census Bureau(httn://www.census.gov/cgi-bin) Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 44 1 Economic Base Over the past five years some industries in the Headwaters area have experienced substantial increases or decreases in employment while others have experienced steady ' increases. Trade and transportation, information services, government, health services and manufacturing have seen small increases and even decreases, while leisure and hospitality and construction have seen steady increases in employment. After a dramatic ' drop when Montana Resources Industries shut down operations in 2003, mining and natural resource jobs have held fairly steady. Table 18 illustrates the employment by industry in southwest Montana. ' Table 18-Southwest Montana Employment by dustry Average Annual 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 % Change Manufacturing 944 914 958 943 1,003 983 0.8°% Construction 1,144 966 1,087 1,166 1,286 1,460 4.9% ' Mining and Natural Res. 978 1,013 925 1,404 1,417 1,403 7.2% Trade,Trans.,Utilities 4,918 1 4,747 1 4,955 4,981 1 4,954 5,077 0.6% Information 477 548 512 387 415 424 -2.4% ' Financial Activities 868 930 963 931 991 1,066 4.1% Prof and Bus Services 1,611 1,697 1,969 1,765 1,942 2,045 4.8% ' Edu. and Health Service 3,937 4,178 3,875 3,863 4,137 4,284 1.7% Leisure and Hospitality 3,616 3,470 3,675 3,800 4,035 5,508 8.4% Other Services 1 782 1 786 1 762 823 810 842 1.5% ' Fed, State,Local Govt. 6,678 6,829 6,916 6,818 6,877 6,841 0.5% TOTAL COVERED 25,953 26,078 26,597 26,881 1 271867 29,933 2.9% Source:Bureau of Labor Statistics(httn://stats.bls.eovn Table 19 on the following page itemizes the major employers within each of the eight ' counties in the Headwaters RC&D area. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 45 1 Table 19—Major Employers Number Employee Class Breakdown: ' 3 =10-19 7=250-499 4 =20-49 8=500-999 5 =50-99 9=1000+ ' 6=100-249 Company Type of Industry No. of ' Employees Anaconda-Deer Lodge County 1st Quarter Restaurant&Casino Services 4 ' AFFCO Foundry 4 Albertsons Retail 4 ' Anaconda Copper Bowl Services 4 Anaconda Job Corps Human Services 5 ' Anaconda Public Schools Education 6 AWARE Human Services 6 Brown Derby Services 4 , Community Hospital&Nursing Home Health 6 Dee Motor Retail 4 ' Discovery Basin Ski Corporation Recreation 6 Fairmont Estates Condo Association Realty 4 Fairmont Hot Springs Recreation 6 ' Headstart Human Services 4 Jordan Contracting Construction 5 ' McDonalds Services 6 Northwestern Energy Utility 5 ' Old Works Recreation 4 Safeway Retail q Beaverhead County , Barrett Hospital & Healthcare Health 6 Barretts Minerals Inc. Talc Mining &Milling 5 ' Beaverhead County Public Schools Education 7 City of Dillon &Beaverhead County Government 6 ' Debco Construction Construction 5 Great Harvest Bread Franchising Retail 4 Parkview Acres Care&Rehabilitation Center Health 5 Pfizer Minerals Talc Mining&Milling 4 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 1007 Area Plan Page 46 ' Table 19—Major Employers Number Employee Class Breakdown: 3 = 10-19 7=250-499 4 = 20-49 8=500-999 5 = 50-99 9=1000+ ' 6=100-249 Company Type of Industry No. of ' Employees R E Miller& Sons 4 Safeway Retail 5 Southwestern Montana Family YMCA Recreation 4 State Bank&Trust Co. Finance 4 ' University of Montana—Western Education 6 US Forest Service Natural Resource 5 Broadwater Bob's Supermarket Retail 4 Broadwater Health Center Health 5 Graymont Continental Lime Mining 4 Horseshoe Cafe Service 4 ' Mint Bar Service 4 RY Timber Timber 6 Town Pump Convenience Store Retail 4 Townsend Personal Care Health 4 Wheat Montana Bakery Agriculture/Production/ ' Wholesale/Retail 6 Silver-Bow County ' Advanced Silicon Materials, Inc. (REC) Mining/Manufacturing 6 AWARE Health 6 Butte Convalescent Center Health 6 Silver-Bow County Public Schools Education 8 Butte-Silver Bow Government 7 ' Children's Comprehensive Services Human Services 6 Community Counseling& Correctional Services Health 7 Crest Nursing Home Human Services 5 Easter Seals—Goodwill Used Merchandise Stores 6 Evergreen Butte Health&Rehabilitation Health 5 Federal Government(various) Government 8 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 47 1 Table 19—Major Employers ' Number Employee Class Breakdown: 3 = 10-19 7=250-499 ' 4=20-49 8=500-999 5= 50-99 9=1000+ 6=100-249 t Company Type of Industry No. of Employees ' Herberger's Retail 5 MSE,Inc. Energy/Technology 6 Development ' NorthWestem Energy Utility 8 Montana Standard Service 6 ' Montana Tech Education 8 Montana Resources Mining 7 ' Safeway Retail 6 Rocky Mountain Clinic Health 3 St. James Community Hospital Health 8 ' Town Pump Retail 7 Wal-Mart Retail 7 ' Granite County Flint Creek Valley Bank Financial 4 ' Granite County Public Schools Education 6 Granite County Government 6 Huffman Grocery Retail 3 ' Sweet Palace Retail 3 Jefferson County , Alternative Youth Adventures Human Services 4 Ash Grove Cement Company Manufacturing 5 , D.H. Blattner& Sons, Inc. Construction 4 Boulder Hot Springs Recreation 4 Bullock Contracting,LLC Construction 4 ' Evergreen Clancy Health &Rehab Center Human Services 5 First Boulder Valley Bank Finance 3 , Jefferson County Government 8 Jefferson County Public Schools Education 7 ' Jefferson IGA Retail 4 Marks-Miller Post&Pole Timber 3 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 48 ' 1 � Table 19—Major Employers Number Employee Class Breakdown: t 3 = 10-19 7=250-499 4=20-49 8=500-999 5 =50-99 9=1000+ ' 6=100-249 Company Type of Industry No. of t Employees M.S. Molitor Trucking, Inc. Transportation 4 Montana City Grill& Saloon Service 4 ' Montana City Store Retail 3 Montana Tunnels Mining 5 Papa Ray's Casino Service 3 Town Pump Retail 4 Wagner Nursery&Landscape Landscaping 4 Madison County A.M. Wells, hrc. Technical Services 5 ' Big Sky Resort Recreation 7 Ennis Pharmacy Retail 5 First Madison Valley Bank Finance 5 J.D.L. Construction Construction 4 ' Luzenac America,Inc. Talc Mining&Milling 5 Madison County Goverment 6 Madison County Public Schools Education 7 Madison Foods Retail 4 Madison Valley Hospital Health 4 ' Moonlight Basin Ranch Recreation 5 Ruby Valley Hospital Health 4 ' Ruby Valley National Bank Finance 4 Ruby Springs Lodge Recreation 5 Saints Nursing Services Health 5 Winston Rod Company Manufacturing 5 Yellowstone Club Realty 7 Powell County I-90 Truck Plaza Retail 3 ' Powell County Government 8 Powell County Memorial Hospital Health 6 Powell County Public Schools Education 7 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 49 1 Table 19—Major Employers ' Number Employee Class Breakdown: 3= 10-19 7=250-499 ' 4=20-49 8=500-999 5=50-99 9=1000+ 6=100-249 ' Company Type of Industry No. of Employees ' Safeway Retail 4 Sun Mountain Lumber Lumber/Timber 6 Town Pump Food Stores Retail 3 ' Valley Foods IGA Retail 3 Source: Department of Labor and Industry(hnp://www.ourfactsvourfuture.orz) 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 50 ' 1 ' Figures 12 through 17 illustrate the Labor Market Trends for Southwest Montana. ' Figure 12—SW Montana Employment—Annual Average Figure 13—Montana Employment—Annual Average ' 99 wa 000 �+ X900 ' x980 198x 1991 19N 19N 19Bx 1981 INi IBm 19M auo x9R xOJI xMb � 91 M 19Px 19N 1996 I� IBB] IBBx 1981 19W I%9 xOW P]x xlOf NW ' Figure l4—SW Montana Un employed—Annual Average Figure 15—Montana Unemployed—Annual Average "0 nom as xr 000 ' xaoo x�am Isoo Is BBO ,poo zow moe Imo Imx 19a, 19m 19m Iwo re9x Iw Iom Ime zom m9z x691 mos IWl 1BBx 19M 1BlB 19x9 IBm 1� Im6 16m IBm 1W9 xCO3 Figure 16—SW Montana Unemployment Rate—Annual Avg. ' Figure 17—Montana Unemployment Rate—Annual Avg. tax enfin a0[6 em rac29v 12% 0°1e 10% f+�ember Rale for 20 eragetl 3.9`v 7% ,/ " Rate'eaa l V. fi% fi°6 S% a% 4% 3% ' 1980 1982 1989 1900 1990 1990 10921996 1998 1998 Me 2002 200a 2005 1980 1902 19M 1988 1988 11111 1992 1996 1996 19.98 2000 2002 2000 1006 ' Since 2003,on an annual basis,SW MT's emplo 2, and the number of unemployed fell 281 workers. L'>1 rce is due to new job creation. Number of unemployed and rates at all time lo� Financial Resources ' The financial resources available from commercial facilities are listed in Table 20 on the following page. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 51 1 Table 20—Financial Institutions Anaconda-Deer Lodge Butte-Silver Bow County (cont.) First National Bank of Montana Glacier Bank 123 Main Street,and 3701 Harrison Avenue 1121 East Park Avenue Butte,MT 59701 , Anaconda,MT 59711 Granite Mountain Bank Glacier Bank 605 Dewey Boulevard 307 East Park Street Butte,MT 59701 ' Anaconda,MT 59711 US Bank Wells Fargo Bank 10 South Main Street ' 120 West Park Avenue Butte,MT 59701 Anaconda,MT 59711 Wells Fargo Bank , Beaverhead County 3650 Harrison Avenue Pioneer Federal Savings&Loan Butte,MT 59701 32 North Washington Street Dillon,MT 59725 Granite County ' Flint Creek Valley Bank Stockman Bank 27 A Street 290 North Montana Drummond,MT 59832 Dillon,MT 59725 Flint Creek Valley Bank Wells Fargo Bank 139 East Broadway 20 North Montana Street Philipsburg,MT 59858 ' Dillon,MT 59725 Jefferson County State Bank and Trust First Boulder Valley Bank 110 S. Idaho 109 West Second ' Dillon,MT 59725 Boulder,MT 59632 Broadwater County Montana City Bank ' State Bank of Townsend 9 Bankers Lane 400 Broadway Street Montana City,MT 59634 Townsend,MT 59644 ' Rocky Mountain Bank American Federal Savings Bank 101 East Legion 416 Broadway Street Whitehall,MT 59759 Townsend,MT 59644 ' Madison County Butte-Silver Bow County First Madison Valley Bank Bank of Butte 213 East Main ' 3525 Harrison Avenue Ennis,MT 59729 Butte,MT 59701 Ruby Valley National Bank First Citizens Bank of Butte 107 S Main Street ' 3220 Harrison Avenue Twin Bridges,MT 59754 Butte,MT 59701 First National Bank of Montana , 1940 Dewey Boulevard Butte,MT 59701 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 52 ' ' Table 20—Financial Institutions Powell County Powell County (cont.) First Security Bank of Deer Lodge Pioneer Federal Savings&Loan 311 Milwaukee Avenue 401 Milwaukee Avenue Deer Lodge,MT 59722 Deer Lodge,MT 59722 ' Peoples Bank of Deer Lodge 430 Main Street ' Deer Lodge,MT 59722 Historic Preservation ' Historic Building and Archaeological Resources Historic and archaeological resources are found in every county in the Headwaters area. ' The State Historic Preservation Society does not distinguish between sites of local, state, or national significance. Table 21 contains properties listed in or eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. Linear sites such as irrigation ditches,historic roads ' and rail grade may also be found in the area. The State Historic Preservation Office should be contacted if any ground disturbing practices will impact these areas. Undiscovered archaeological resources may also exist. A cultural survey must be ' conducted before a direct physical changed begins on a project that uses federal money or requires a federal permit. Table 21 —Historic Places Name Description City/Town I Listed Ownership Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Alpine Apartments Building Anaconda 1998 Private ' Anaconda Commercial Historic Private,Local District Historic District Anaconda 1998 Gov.,Federal Anaconda Copper Mining Co. ' Smoke Stack Smoke Stack Anaconda 1987 State Anaconda Street Railway Barn Buildin2 Anaconda 2000 Private Ancient Order of Hibemians ' Hall Buildin Anaconda 1979 Local Gov. Barich Block Building Anaconda 1983 Private Brewery Antiques&Western MT Fur Center Building Anaconda 2000 Private Butte, Anaconda&Pacific Butte/ Railway Historic District Historic District Anaconda 1988 Private, State ' California Creek Q Site Anaconda 1989 State rCity Hall Building Anaconda 1979 Local Gov. Club Moderne Building Anaconda 1986 Private 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 53 Table 21 —Historic Places ' Name Description City/Town/Town Listed Ownership James V. Collins House Building Anaconda 2000 Private , Davidson Building Building Anaconda 1983 Local Gov. Deer Lode County Courthouse Building Anaconda 1978 Local Gov. ' Durston Block&Annex Building Anaconda 1986 Private Theodore Eck House Building Anaconda 1998 Private John Furst House Building Anaconda 1998 Private ' Glover Cabin Building Anaconda 2000 Private Private,Local , Goosetown Historic District Historic District Anaconda 1998 Gov. Granite Apartments Building Anaconda 2000 Private Hearst Free Libra Building Anaconda 1973 Local Gov. ' Lorraine Apartments Building Anaconda 2000 Private Marcus Daly Hotel Building Anaconda 1979 Private Duncan Matheson House Building Anaconda 1998 Private ' Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda Building Anaconda 1994 Private Willard E Mitchell Stadium Structure Anaconda 2000 Local Gov. , Rainbow Bride Bride Anaconda 2000 Private The Butte House Building Anaconda 2000 Private ' Empty Arms Boardinghouse Building Anaconda 2000 Private St.Mark's Episcopal Church Building Anaconda 1978 Private Jude Wellington Na ton House Building Anaconda 1998 Private ' AFFCO Foundry District Anaconda 1988 Private Anaconda Post Office Building Anaconda 1986 Federal George Waddell House Building Anaconda 1998 Private Washoe Theatre Building Anaconda 1982 Private Private,Local ' West Side Historic District Historic District Anaconda 1998 Gov. Zion Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church Building Anaconda 1998 Private Beaverhead County, Bannack Historic District Historic District Bannack 1966 State,Federal Barrett Hospital Building Dillon 1985 Local Gov. ' Martin Barrett House Building Dillon 1987 Private Big Hole National Battlefield site Wisdom 1966 Federal Birch Creek CCC Camp District Dillon 1982 Federal ' Canyon Creek Charcoal Kilns District Glendale 2005 Federal Clark's Lookout Site Dillon 1994 State , Dillon City Library Building Dillon 1978 Local Gov. Hotel Metlen Building Dillon 1983 Local Gov. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 54 , ' Table 21 —Historic Places Name Description City/Town Listed Ownership Lamarche Game Trap Site Dillon 1976 Federal Western MT College Old Main Building Dillon 1980 State ' Oregon Short Line Passenger Depot Building Dillon 1990 Local Gov. Sheep Creek Wickiup Cave Site Lima 1981 Federal ' US Post Office—Dillon Main Building Dillon 1986 Federal Broadwater County Crow Creek Ditch Structure Townsend 2000 Federal McCormick's Livery&Feed Stable Sin Site Townsend 1981 Federal Rankin Ranch Building NE Helena 1976 Private ' St. Joseph's Catholic Mission Church(Canton Church) I Building I Townsend 1998 Private State Bank of Townsend Building Townsend 1 1992 Private Butte-Silver Bow County Big Hole Pumpstation Building Divide 1980 Private Private, Local Butte Historic District Historic District Butte 1996 Gov. Butte,Anaconda&Pacific Butte/ Railway Historic District Historic District Anaconda 1988 Private ' Charles W. Clark Mansion Building Butte 1976 Private W.A. Clark Mansion Building Butte 1970 Private Hawthorne Grade School Building Butte 1988 Local Gov. Longfellow Grade School Building Butte 1988 Local Gov. Madison Grade School Building Butte 1988 Private ' Matt's Place Drive-In Building Butte 2001 Private Private,Local Ramsay Historic District Historic District Ramsay 1988 Gov. ' Silver Bow Brewery Malt House Building Butte 1983 Private NCAT Building Butte 1981 Local Gov. ' Fran Johnson's Sport Shop Building Butte 1995 Private U.S.Post Office Building Butte 1979 Federal Burton K. Wheeler House Building Butte 1976 Private Granite County Anderson Lumber Company Building Philipsburg 1986 Private M.E. Doe House Building Philipsburg 1986 Private ' Granite County Jail Building Philipsburg 1980 Local Gov. Miners Union Hall Building Philipsburg 1974 State John Case Homestead;Puyear Ranch District Phili s urg ederal Philipsburg Grade School Building Philipsburg 1986 Local Gov. ' Granite County Jail Historic District Philipsburg 1986 Private, Local Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 55 Table 21 —Historic Places , Name Description SRo.ck n Listed Ownership Gov. , Rin elfin House Building 1986 Private Rock Creek Guard Station Building k 1982 Federal Su erintendent's House Buildin 1974 State Jefferson County Boulder Hot Springs Hotel Building Boulder 1979 Private , White Face Farm;Kleffner Ranch Building East Helena 1977 Private Fraternity Hall Building Elkhorn 1975 Private Jefferson County Courthouse Building Boulder 1980 Local Gov. Kme er House Building Bozeman 1987 Private ' MacHaffie Site Site Montana City 1986 Private Old Administration Building Building Boulder 1985 State Madison County' Beaverhead Rock—Lewis & Clark Expedition Site Dillon 1970 Federal Dr. Don L. Byam House Building Nevada City 2002 State ' Christ Episcopal Church& Rectory Building Sheridan 1987 Private Finney House Building Nevada City 2002 State , Hutchins Bride Structure Cameron 1999 Local Gov. Madison Count Fairgrounds District Twin Bridges 1984 Local Gov. g g Y , James W. Pearson House Building Sheridan 1986 Private Pony Historic District Historic District Pony 1987 Private Powder House Building Pony 1987 Private , Daly's Place Building Alder 1976 Local Gov. Maddison Store;Jensen Family Market Building Sheridan 1994 Private ' Saint Mary of the Assumption Building Laurin 1985 Private Strawberry Mine Historic District Historic District Pony 1987 Private ' Christenot Mill Site Virginia City 1999 Federal Private, Local Virginia City Historic District Historic District Virginia City 1966 Gov. Federal , Powell County The Bielenberg Home Building Deer Lode 1979 Private Charter Oak Mine&Mill District Elliston 2001 Federal ' Nimrod Fee House Building Deer Lode 1979 Private Deer Lodge Women's , Clubhouse Building Deer Lode 1982 Private Nevada Lake Ranch; Isabel Territorial Post Office; District Avon 1981 State Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 56 1 Table 21 —Historic Places ­ Name Description I City/To /Town Listed wncrshi Fitzpatrick Private,Local Grant-Kohrs Ranch District Deer Lode 2003 Gov.Federal Grant-Kohrs Ranch Historic Site District Deer Lode 1972 1 Federal William K.Kohrs Library Building Deer Lode 1979 Local Gov. ' Old Montana State Prison District Deer Lode 1976 State Northern Pacific Railroad Completion Site 1883 Site Gold Creek 1983 Private ' Prison Brickyard Historic District Historic District Deer Lode 1988 State Rialto Theatre(recently burned) Building Deer Lode 1 1998 1 Private ' Trask Hall Building Deer Lode 1982 Local Gov. Source: http://www.nation!re eisterothistoricp laces.comIMTLstate.htm[ Infrastructure t Services ' Infrastructure needs within Headwaters RC&D/EDD Area continue to be a major focal point. Communities must continually work to upgrade their infrastructure, and make improvements that will better the quality of life for the residents. However, changing government regulations, population growth in rural areas and tight fiscal budgets exacerbate infrastructure problems that in turn create obstacles to economic development and can result in environmental threats. Solid Waste Management ' Regulations effective in 1994 have resulted in many cities and counties making a change in their solid waste management from local Class H (municipal solid waste) landfills to ' Class III (inert waste) landfills, to install container sites, and to haul their solid wastes to other counties. ' Butte-Silver Bow and Beaverhead counties have relatively new landfill facilities. Butte- Silver Bow's old landfill has been converted to a golf driving range and public park. Madison County, Twin Bridges, and Ennis closed their old Class II landfills, opened Class III landfills, and are hauling wastes to Beaverhead county and Gallatin County's Logan Class II Landfill, respectively. Powell County's landfill has continued operation. Granite County has two container sites, and the waste is hauled to Missoula. Jefferson County has staffed container sites in Whitehall and Boulder and the waste is hauled to the Valley View Landfill in Jefferson County near East Helena. ' Two solid waste districts exist within Deer Lodge County: The Deer Lodge County Refuse Disposal District and the Big Hole Solid Waste District, which are separated by the east-west traverse of the Continental Divide through the county. The Deer Lodge Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 57 1 County Refuse Disposal District Landfill is located east of the Anaconda Company's former Arbiter Plant, allowing for the disposals of Class II materials. The Big Hole Solid Waste District contracts with Butte-Silver Bow for disposal of Class II solid waste at the , Butte-Silver Bow Landfill at Rocker. There are several private recycling companies in Butte and Anaconda. The Headwaters ' RC&D assisted with the development of Headwaters Cooperative Recycling in 1997. This cooperative effort provides recycling services in five of the Headwaters RC&D counties, Yellowstone National Park and the three counties served by Norther Rockies , RC&D. In FY `07 4,788 tons were recycled under this program. Water and Sewer Systems , All of the larger cities and towns in the eight-county area have central water and sewer , systems. Many of the small towns and rural areas rely on individual wells and/or septic systems to meet their needs. Low-density urban sprawl areas are also in need of adequate sewer and water systems. In , some cases, the use of wells and septic systems are incompatible. Seasonal water tables restrict drain fields in some locations. Drain fields on steep slopes cause seepage problems and unsanitary conditions. Careful evaluation of the soil resource and avoidance of housing development in unsuitable areas are essential. New water quality laws present challenges to water departments across southwester ' Montana. Water treatment facilities for surface water will be a costly requirement for many communities. ' Treated wastewater effluents must be disinfected. Depending on the classification of the receiving watercourse, conventional chlorination must also include de-chlorination before ' being discharged into area streams, or the use of an alternate disinfectant such as ultra- violet light. Geography and climate affect wastewater treatments. Cold temperatures seasonally suppress activity in biological treatment systems, resulting in the need for ' longer detention times and larger system sizes. Montana's wastewater is probably more expensive to treat than that in more temperate climates. Public roadways in smaller communities have limited or no central storm drainage ' facilities, unless provided in conjunction with the Federal Aid Highway routes. In some communities with central storm drainage systems, icing is a problem in winter months. ' Technical assistance and financing are essential to help these communities maintain and improve their water and wastewater infrastructure. Availability of reliable utility systems ' bears directly on quality of life, and protection of health and the environment. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 58 , Wastewater Systems In the past 10 years, multiple wastewater treatment systems have been updated and modernized to comply with EPA regulations. Butte's Metro Sewer's wastewater ' treatment plant was updated, modernizing its activated sludge process and sludge disposal system. Rocker constructed a new `package' activated sludge treatment plant. The Galen (State Hospital) Campus upgraded its wastewater treatment plant, and Drummond completed an outfall sewer replacement to reduce groundwater infiltration and prolong the utility of its single-cell facultative lagoon. Dillon constructed an aerated facility and Anaconda wastewater is treated in a non-discharging aerated lagoon facility, ' with infiltration/percolation ponds and seasonal effluent irrigation. The feasibility of providing central sewage to the West Valley and Opportunity areas is still being considered. ' In 2006, Dillon annexed a low-moderate income area on the outskirts of its City limits and extended its wastewater collection system into the area, thus taking residents off of ' old, ineffective septic tanks. Wisdom replaced its 30 year old lagoon system which was located in the floodplain with new treatment lagoons one mile east of the old lagoons. A new lift station and force main convey the town's wastewater to the new treatment ' lagoons. The effluent from the lagoons is spray irrigated on land adjacent to the lagoons. Twin Bridges is applying for funds to assist with a major updating of its wastewater treatment facility to bring it into compliance with EPA/DEQ regulations and allow for ' growth in the area. Headwaters has assisted these three communities with their wastewater system projects. ' Growth needs and tightening regulatory requirements will require modification and upgrade of other area wastewater systems in the next decade. Additional effluent limits for fecal coliforms, nitrogen, and in some cases phosphorous are likely to be promulgated by MDEQ. This could impact area communities, particularly those discharging to streams. Historically, many of the smaller wastewater lagoon systems in the area have not practiced effluent disinfection. The Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) limits on nutrient discharge continue to present a unique challenge in the Clark Fork River watershed and throughout the Headwaters region. These regulations resulted in the construction of a non-discharging lagoon system in the city of Deer Lodge that seasonally stores and land applies effluent. The map in Figure 18 on the following page illustrates MDEQ's TMDL Planning Area ' Completion Schedule for Montana. Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. ' 1007Area Plan Page 59 a Montana Department of Environmental Quality A TMDL Planning Area Completion Schedule by m i (! �� Ima .mS Mevuf a f Jj4rW�� \tliW wa M1WAxuI r tf�J! xirbWnu � I Nwm t V ��^...1 N I wN 9: O � '13 1�Iry r J<� 4olw `e _ t .. eys� .rte_ l f I:�N fD v N s,��- "�`� w e c S ■ReWralion Plan Appmed a 7N]DL's�mles�'clopmcul■ "TnW lynds 2006 TNOL's Not Slaved Schedule 200}2012 Miles hm�„xrwx+lm�r.rtena mJr.pollwmmmnovem O 740 acme almlmuexawilFwMMN amni.YO,y gill rtquue �`Va nJV Vmery^adriia� Tillf.JmxlgmmtYa vaMauluM bM �IM1�Yrt � rod�lxnm.. Vwaaon 4-11-2046 11� Drinldng Water Systems ' Adequate water systems are essential to the health of the residents and its economic vitality. Water districts and city and county governments must meet demands for both quality and quantity. Area public water supplies face similar challenges with aging ' facilities, growth pressures, and tightening regulatory standards. With the exception of those mentioned in the following paragraphs, area water systems capacities are generally adequate for most current usages. Severe drought conditions has caused temporary water shortages, poor water quality and rationing during summer ' months. Rationing typically affects only non-essential usages such as lawn watering. The Big Hole Water Treatment Plant is the centerpiece of Butte's water system, filtering ' 16 million gallons per day. Basin Creek Reservoir remains an untreated (other than disinfection) peaking supply for summer demands. A major concern for Butte-Silver Bow is the threat of a major forest fire in the Basin Creek and Moulten Reservoir areas ' which could affect water purity. The Anaconda Water System consists of six wells ranging from 40 to 50 feet in depth ' with a capacity of 5.2 million gallons per day. A 3.5 million gallon pre-stressed concrete tank is used for storage. Water is chlorinated prior to being pumped to the storage tank. Anaconda has a peak use of up to 7 million gallons per day in the summer, but the system ' cannot sustain that demand. Anaconda-Deer Lodge County is currently evaluating options for expanding water supply, including additional wells, Hearst Lake, and other sources. Water resources are available in the area, but in some cases compromised by past mining-smelting activity. Consideration is also being given to providing municipal supply to the West Valley and Opportunity areas, from the Anaconda municipal system. Water is already delivered to the Warm Springs State Hospital Campus through the new transmission main. Headwaters RC&D/EDD has assisted Boulder, Virginia City, and Lima with water improvement projects. ' Expanding regulatory mandates will likely require additional water infrastructure upgrades for area communities. The promulgation of new federal regulations pertaining to groundwater disinfection, mandatory surface water filtration, disinfectant residuals and by-products, corrosion control, radon and radionuclides, and arsenic may require additional treatment or mitigation, depending on the source and chemistry of individual communities' water supplies. Financial assistance will be critical, particularly in ' communities with smaller rate bases, in implementing water system upgrades in response to forthcoming regulations. ' Transportation ' The Port of Montana is located at the intersection of two major interstates, I-90 and I-15, and at the only point in Montana where two transcontinental railroads interface, the ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 61 Burlington Northern/Santa Fe (BNSF) and the Union Pacific (UP). The Port of Montana intermodal hub facility provides access to new markets at competitive rates. The Port of Montana Port Authority (POMPA) specializes in warehousing, transloading ' and distribution of a wide variety of commodities that include forest products, minerals and ores, chemicals, packaged foods, and manufactured goods. The Port ships and , receives products from both domestic and international points. POMPA offers a wide variety of services including transportation planning, document preparation, inventory control, US Customs ' clearance, and a bonded warehouse. POMPA has equipment to handle most transloading jobs including a swath engine, forklifts, a ' front-end loader, piggypackers and conveyors. The Port also has over 175,000 square feet of covered storage. , s Hi hwa g Y The Headwaters area has approximately 321 miles of interstate highways, nearly 500 miles of primary highways, and several hundred miles of secondary roads. The major ' interstate highways are illustrated in Figure 19. Greyhound provides bus services in Silver Bow County and Rimrock Stages services Powell County. Table 22 lists Interstate highway distances to major cities. ' Figure 19—Montana Major Interstates w , MYWe ' -�" HOW" i n Bart � J s . s ,i Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 62 ' 1 1 Table 22—Interstate Highway Distances to Major Cities from Butte (Butte as the approximate center of the Headwaters Area) Helena 65 miles Seattle 598 miles Portland 665 miles San Francisco 1,030 miles Los Angeles 1,102 miles Salt Lake City 417 miles ' Las Vegas 831 miles Denver 774 miles Omaha 1,047 miles ' Minneapolis 1,038 miles Calgary 447 miles ' The State of Montana Department of Transportation recently released the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) draft with anticipated projects through ' 2009. Figure 20 below illustrates the breakdown of funding by improvement type and Figure 21 on the following page indicates the location of the anticipated projects in southwestern Montana. II Figure 20—Fund Used in FYS 2007 —2009 By Improvement ' Resurface Rehabiliation/ 146.2Mdtion ' Widen _ 19.1% Spot rrTrovement 40.4 Million &Safety 5.3% 36.2 Million 4.7% Construction/ / idge Reconstruction & ern 444.2 Million, Replaccement/ 5820% Rehabilitation Miscellaneous 76.6 Million 20.1 Million,2.60/6 10.0°/a FUND USE INCLUDES CNAND CE Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 63 Figure 21 —Proposed Road Improvement Projects for the Headwaters Area 5134 5 5 - t78 211744-002 1233 1744-001 -0 6229 X363 1233 ; 4498 868 t .wl. 623 226 3 984 5968 384 5 i2 68 6Y '5384 2016.001 384 w 513. H 384 , 192 6222 ; �23 2015 w,, 508 60 00 5 72 , 4260-00 579 _ t - 79 X4774 " 46-Od' -- 223 142 Y" -6194 :621945 5 262 9;1 4804 , 4 50 X07 2 4180- 1� 97 5 4862 .:: 547 5 Map Legend 620 .4� 5466 5959 4 18 ' STIP Projects 6208 0 1- 218 system Designations z 802 NH6 a sf eb 221 A. 6217 511 NHS WrvinMtleb D,11 621 544-06 — nmsn 5963 4791 Butte Y 546 Route\umbers 5519 59611 , o IHersWe District 2 5960 Boundaries m°mere reeurvaiun i 48 e secmeey , Lrn.r.mi o.1-1 Cities and Tms7rs ~A. s. sme Ce l Other symbols Imnlweae DR, ocvNi 2 ' Source: Montana Department of Transportation , httn://www.mdt.mt.nov/publications/does/newsletters/newsline/2007/newapr07.ndf Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 64 ' The Department's District Offices also have available `six-year plans' of priority projects scheduled. Unfortunately, these projects are considered tentative as they are based upon ' federal funding allocations. ' Airports ' The Butte-Silver Bow facility provides commercial service to U.S. and Canadian destinations through Horizon and Skywest. Figure 22 shows air distances to major cities from Butte-Silver Bow's Bert Mooney Airport. There are several airports in the eight- ' county area that serve small private planes. These include one in each of Anaconda-Deer Lodge, Jefferson, Powell, and Butte-Silver Bow counties, two in Granite County, and three in each of Beaverhead and Madison counties. The Beaverhead County airports at ' Dillon and Dell each have medium jet capacity (up to 50,000 lbs.), with on-site jet fuel and mechanics available at Dillon. There are limited airport services at Wisdom. ' Figure 22—Air Distances to Major Cities from Butte, MT Calgary 305 e 400 ' Portland 425 BUTTE + Minneapolis 760 Reno 495 Salt Lake City 310 ' San Francisco 675 Denver 500 Chicago 1070 JNerkCity 1660 Las Vegas 695 Kansas City 880 Wa 1570 ' Los Angeles 750 Albuquerque 710 Phoenix 750 Atlanta 1440 Dallas 1060 ' Houston 1240 ' Railroads ' Rail service is provided by the Class I systems of BNSF, Montana Rail Link, Inc., and UP. Additional service is provided by the Class III systems of Montana Western Railway and BA&P Railway. Union Pacific operates from the south end of the state to Butte. Montana Western Railway operates from Butte to Garrison and serves as a bridge carrier between the UP at Silver Bow and Montana Rail Link at Garrison. BA&P Railway operates a short line from the Anaconda area to BNSF and Montana Western Railway ' lines. It also serves as an interchange for Anaconda and Butte industrial parks. Montana Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007Area Plan Page 65 . � Rail Link services Granite Count Kamm_ Jefferson Count5 e Qm Madison cxmrrison, Sheridan, and Twin Bridges. Figure 23 on U following page shows aa_#. Figure z —Regional Railroad Ro s ) � |{ r x ) § . � ■ � ` � � l�k� | � . �: , ' [ ■ W t± � 2 ■ < ! !g 2 ©! / 1 � � Source: :__+__wr�lra+ap Headwaters Area,Inc. � 2007 Are,mn Page y ' Telecommunications Montana's 10 local exchange companies and numerous other telecommunications service providers offer advanced voice, data, and video telecommunications services to ' businesses and residential consumers throughout the state. More than 5,000 miles of fiber optics link Montana rural communities and urban centers with high-speed, broadband on-ramps to the intemet. A packet-switched, ATM-based fiber ring connects 90 full-motion distance learning video conference sites in rural Montana communities. More than 80 percent of the state's population lives within 50 miles of a DS-3 direct ' connection to the internet. The entire state has local dial-up connectivity to the internet. Montana's switching architecture is 100 percent digital. High-speed cable-modem and DSL (digital subscriber line) services are being deployed not only in Montana's larger population centers, but also in remote communities with populations of 1,000 and under. ' Utilities Two companies provide power service to the Headwaters eight-county area: ' Northwestern Energy, and Vigilante Electric. Based in Butte, Northwestern Energy provides service to 288,000 electric customers in Montana. Northwestern Energy's electric transmission system consists of over 7,000 miles of transmissions lines and associated terminal facilities. This expansive system with voltage levels ranging from 50,000 to 500,000 volts, serves an area of 97,540 square miles or two thirds of Montana. Northwestern Energy systems has interconnections to five major transmission systems located in the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) area, as well as one interconnection to a system connecting with the Mid-Continent Area Power Pool (MAPP) Region. Vigilante Electric was established in 1936 to service areas Northwestern Energy, formerly Montana Power, determined were not profitable for them to serve. These areas were usually located outside of city limits and within agricultural communities. Based in Dillon, Vigilante Electric provides service to 4,339 electric customers throughout Beaverhead, Deer Lodge, Jefferson, Madison, and Silver Bow counties. The electric company's transmission system consists of 2,516 miles of transmission lines. ' Housing The lack of workforce appropriate housing was identified in all eight counties as a major concern. The problems encountered throughout the region include the need for new housing for influxes of population in all income ranges, as well as infrastructure needs for ' new housing developments. The escalating costs for land and construction are pricing many first time homeowners out of the market and making it increasingly hard in some areas to attract needed workers in the service industry. Community Assessments in the cities of Deer Lodge and Anaconda and Housing Plans in Powell and Madison counties Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 67 reaffirmed the lack of affordable, adequate, and available housing. Powell County has a severe shortage of adequate and affordable houses, thus a substantial number of employees at Montana State Prison must commute from other communities. While Madison County statistics indicate a substantial amount of construction, due to the development in Big Sky area, the service workers in the Big Sky area are unable to find housing and most commute from the Bozeman area. Towns like Twin Bridges are struggling with economic development due to the lack of places for people to live. High- end building in Granite County is having an effect on Philipsburg's water/sewer infrastructure. Table 23 illustrates housing unit estimates within the Headwaters area over the past 5 years. Boulder, Dillon, and Butte are all supporting the construction of Self-Help Housing in cooperation with the National Affordable Housing Network and USDA Rural Development. The City of Deer Lodge is looking at the potential of developing a program. Habitat for Humanity has active chapters in Butte, Dillon, and Anaconda. ' Communities are starting to consider innovative ways to address housing needs such as land trusts for affordable housing and incentives for developers to either build or make land available for affordable housing. The chart below shows the number of housing ' units in each county. Table 23—Housing it Estimates April 1, Percent Change County 2000 July 1,2005 2000-2005 ' Anaconda-Deer Lodge County 4,958 5,027 1.4 Beaverhead County 4,571 4,615 1.0 Butte-Silver Bow County 16,176 16,228 0.3 Broadwater County 2,002 2,030 1.4 Granite County 2,074 2,080 0.3 ' Jefferson County 4,199 4,213 0.3 Madison County 4,671 4,734 1.3 Powell County 16,176 16,228 0.3 , Source: httP.11W w.ceic.mteovI Demor/estimate/HU-EST2005-04-30 nercchp0005.xis While the population of Jefferson County grew by 11.2% the number of housing units ' grew by only .3%. The same holds true for Madison and Granite Counties where population growth has outstripped housing development. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 68 ' Medical Facilities and Services St. James Healthcare in Butte-Silver Bow serves as a regional medical center. Founded in 1881 by the Sisters ' of Charity of Leavenworth, Kansas, A ; this 100-bed facility has a Level III Trauma designation with neurosurgical ' capabilities and a 24-hour physician- „ , 1• "--- led trauma and cardiac care team. The s hospital offers people from with the eight-region area specialized services �*in cardiology, oncology, radiology, ' orthopedics, obstetrics, neonatology, 3 pediatrics, dialysis, neuroscience and rehabilitation. It is staffed by nearly St.James Healthcare ' 600 employees, all dedicated to the Butte,MT integration of traditional and technology. St. James also provides a cancer treatment center, renal dialysis unit, ' cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, advanced imaging diagnostics, outpatient services and a transitional care unit. (http://stiameshealthcare.org) ' Barrett Hospital and Healthcare in Dillon is a 31-bed facility that provides acute medical and obstetric care, inpatient and outpatient surgery, emergency room, coronary and intensive care units and home care. ' Community Hospital of Anaconda is a 40-bed facility with a 24-hour emergency services physician. Services available at the hospital include obstetrics, general surgery, cataract ' surgery and orthopedic surgery. Powell County Medical Center offers 24-hour emergency services, same day surgery, obstetrics, outpatient lab and x-ray and home health. Madison County has two hospitals, the Madison Valley Hospital in Ennis and the Ruby Valley Hospital in Sheridan. The Madison Valley Hospital is undergoing a major expansion that began in 2006 with the addition of a CT scanner. Groundbreaking for the new, 38,000 square foot critical access hospital (CAH) took place in September 2007 ' with completion in late 2008. The Ruby Valley Hospital is a full service medical center and nursing home. ' Granite County Medical Center and Nursing Home in Philipsburg provides 33 beds along with an emergency room, outpatient lab, and x-ray services. The facility also has physical and respiratory therapy. The expanded nursing home has 28 long-term beds. I 1 Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 69 In addition to the hospitals, local clinics, nursing homes and community health agencies, three hospice centers are available in the area. There are 15 certified ambulance services in the Headwaters counties and life-flight services are available. Acadia, Inc. in Butte is an 85-bed facility designed to provide inpatient mental health care services to emotionally disturbed children and youth ages 5 to 18. Montana State ' Hospital at Warm Springs in Deer Lodge County is a psychiatric hospital serving adults. Alternative Youth Adventures in Boulder is a 32-bed facility serving troubled youth ages 11 to 17. Cultural and Recreational Facilities ' Cultural and recreational events and attractions play an important role in the area, although types of entertainment such as plays and concerts are not as numerous as in ' large cities. One of the most popular attractions is the Virginia City Players which puts on productions at the Virginia City Opera House or the Virginia City Brewery during the summer months. The Butte Community Theatre produces a drama or comedy each ' autumn and a musical in the spring, and the Butte Symphony Orchestra presents four concerts a year between October and April. The Covalite Theatre, a performing and folk arts theatre, puts on plays and concerts in Butte during the summer season. Dillon has annual productions by the Dillon Junior Fiddlers, the Wapiti Players, the Shoreline Players, the Old Depot Theatre, and the Dillon Community Orchestra. Philipsburg and Deer Lodge also boast of summer threatre productions that attract visitors to the ' communities. Philipsburg's summer Jazz on Broadway is a major event in SW MT. The Headwaters RC&D/EDD eight-county area is located within Montana's `Gold West ' Country'. This area boasts of ghost towns, unspoiled wilderness, spectacular views, big ranches, trout-filled rivers, and a relaxed pace of life. Historical resources are important to every community in the area. Anaconda was the site of one of the world's largest , copper smelter, and the remaining 80-foot stack can still be seen today. Deer Lodge is home to the Montana Territorial Prison and the Vintage Car and Transportation Museum. The pioneers and the war of the Copper Kings over mining rights are the foundation of , much of the region's history. The Old Works Golf Course in Anaconda, designed by professional golfer, Jack ' Nicklaus, is build on a reclaimed superfund site, and is complemented by a historic trail system. In 2005, after nearly fourteen years of effort,the Butte and Anaconda National Historic , Landmark District process came to Tuition. The Butte-Anaconda Historic District enlarges the Butte NHL through the addition of the nearby industrial community of ' Anaconda, the Butte Anaconda &Pacific Railroad line, the Washoe Smote Stack, and contributing elements of Butte's mining and smelting landscape. The District houses more than 8,000 properties and provides focus on the important history of Butte and ' Anaconda during the late 10 and early 20`h centuries (http://www.buttearchives.org/2005.hLmIj. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 70 ' 1 Table 24 lists many of the cultural facilities found in the eight-county area. Table 24—Cultural Facilities Anaconda-Deer Lodge Butte-Silver Bow County (cont.) Copper Village Museum&Arts Center Copper King Mansion&Gallery ' Hearst Free Library Mai Wah Chinese Museum Marcus Daly Historical Society Mineral Museum Washoe Theatre Motherlode Theatre Picaddilly Museum of Transportation Beaverhead County World Museum of Mining Beaverhead County Museum t Dillon Public Library Granite County K.I.T. Glass Drummond Museum MT. Writers' Association Drummond Public Library ' Southwest Montana Art's Council Granite County Museum and Cultural Center Western Montana College Gallery/Museum Ohrmann Museum&Gallery Wisdom Women's Club Library Philipsburg Public Library ' Broadwater County Jefferson County Antiques &Junque Boulder Community Library ' Broadwater County Library Clancy Memorial Library County Museum Jefferson County Museum Old Bailey's Art Gallery Jefferson Valley Museum ' Tori James' Antiques John Gregory Memorial Library Whitehall Museum Butte-Silver Bow County Madison County ' Anselmo Mine Yard Alder Gulch Short Line Stream Railroad Museum Arts Chateau Hole in the Wall Art Gallery&Monumental Butte-Silver Bow Public Archives Sculpture ' Butte Archives Madison County(cont.) Powell County Ranks Drug Store Museum Frontier Montana Museum Rocky Mountain Antler Museum Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site Sheridan Public Library Montana Auto Museum Thompson-Hickman Free Library Old Prison Museum ' Twin Bridges Historical Museum Powell County Museum&Arts Foundation Twin Bridges Public Library Territorial Treasures Wildlife Museum of the West Wild West Museum Madison County Lewis &Clark Interpretive William Kohrs' Memorial Library ' Park Yesterday's Playthings Madison County/Thompson-Hickman Memorial ' Museum Madison Valley Public Library National Museum of Machinery ' Nevada City Nevada City Frontier House Museum Source. Montana Arts Council, Travel Montana, Montana Department of Commerce and 1994-1995 ' Montana's Cultural Treasurers. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 71 Athletics are a popular pastime in southwest Montana. With the addition of the Maroon Activities Center (MAC) in 2005, Butte now has three excellent facilities (Montana Tech, The Civic Center, and the MAC) in addition to Butte High School, in which to hold regional and state games and tournaments. Advantage Butte, a local promotion organization, has been very successful in increasing the number of tournaments hosted by the Mining City. ' Social Services ' There are numerous social services available in the eight-county area. Tables 25 through 29 list available services. ' Table 25—Services for the Developmentally Disabled ' Anaconda-Deer Lodge County AWARE,Inc. Aware Day Training/Workshop ' Aware Group Home Independent Living Group Home Beaverhead County ' None Broadwater County ' None Butte-Silver Bow County Advocacy Program of Southwestern Montana ' AWARE Adult Day Service Region IV Family Outreach,Inc.—Satellite Office Mountain View Social Development Center Silver Bow County Developmental Disabilities Council,Inc. ' Butte Sheltered Workshops(BSW),Inc. BSW,Inc.Day Training Facility BSW,Inc.Group Homes(6) ' Granite County None Jefferson County Alliance Outreach Services Montana Developmental Center ' Madison County None ' Powell County None Source. Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Developmental Disabilities , Program,Region IV Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 72 t 1 ' Table 26—Comm nity Services Anaconda-Decr Lodge Broadwater(Cont.) Anaconda-Deer Lodge Dept. Health&Human Rocky Mountain Development Council Services Salvation Army Anaconda Indian Alliance Summit Project Area V Home Health Agency AWARE, Inc. Butte-Silver Bow Big Brothers and Sisters of Anaconda AFL-CIO Career Futures Adult Protection Service Human Resource Development Council, Dist.XII Advocacy Program of Southwestern Montana ' Beaverhead County Alcoholism Services Beaverhead Department of Health&Human American Cancer Society Services Community Food Bank American Red Cross ' Habitat for Humanity Big Brothers and Sisters of Butte, Inc. Human Resource Development Council, Dist.XII Blaine Community Center Ministerial Association Butte Emergency Food Bank Search and Rescue Butte Literacy Program ' United Way Butte Recovery House Women's Resource Center Butte Rescue Mission Butte-Silver Bow Dept. Of Health&Human ' Broadwater County Services Human Services Office Career Futures Ministerial Association Consumer Credit Counseling Service Butte-Silver Bow County(cont.) Jefferson County Easter Seals-Good Will Industries of Career Futures Montana Jeffco Food Share Program t Financial Aid& Social Services Jefferson Dept. Of Health&Human Services Four C's Rocky Mountain Development Council Fuel Assistance(LIEAP) Summit Project ' Diners Club for Senior Citizens Whitehall Food Bank Family Outreach,Inc. Headstart Program Madison County Homeward Bound Human Resource Dept. Council, Dist XII ' Hospice Madison County Helpline Human Resc. Develop. Council,Dist.XII Madison Dept. Of Health&Human Services Montana View Social Development Center North American Indian Alliance Powell County St. James Com. Hosp. Social Service Dept. Deer Lodge Food Pantry Salvation Army Headstart Program Safe Space Human Resource Dept. Council,Dist XII Tele-Care Service Ministerial Association Indigent Fund United Way Career Futures ' Powell Dept. Of Health&Human Services Granite County Teens in Partnership- Shodair Hospital Career Futures Tele-Care Service ' Granite Dept. of Health&Human Services TIP Human Resource Dev. Council, Dist.XII Margo Bower's Med. Center/Home Care Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 73 Table 27—WIC Offic ' Anaconda-Deer Lodge County—Anaconda Beaverhead County—Dillon , Broadwater County—Townsend with Satellite Office in White Sulphur Springs Butte-Silver Bow County—Butte Granite County—Drummond ' Jefferson County—Boulder with Satellite Office in Whitehall Madison County—Ennis (a Satellite Office in Gallatin County) Powell County—Deer Lodge ' Source: Montana Department of Health and Human Services,Helena Montana Table 28—Senior'Citizens ' Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Area V Agency on Aging Metcalf Memorial Senior Citizen's Center ' Beaverhead County Beaverhead Senior Citizen's Center ' Beaverhead Bus Beaverhead Allied Senior Service t Broadwater County Rocky Mountain Development Programs , Senior Citizen's Dinner Club Butte-Silver Bow County Butte-Silver Bow Council on Aging ' Mining City Christmas North American Elderly Indian Alliance Senior Citizen's Bus Service ' Senior Citizen's Center Granite County ' Drummond Senior Citizen's Center Philipsburg Senior Citizen's Center Jefferson County Boulder Senior Citizen's Center Whitehall Senior Center Madison County ' Madison Valley Senior Citizens Senior Citizen's Organization Powell County ' Alzheimer's Support Group Deer Lodge Senior Citizen's Club ' Powell Co.Council of Aging Powell Co. Senior Citizen's Club Source: Local Information Sources ' Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007AreaPlan Page 74 ' Table 29—Chemical Dependence Treatment Programs ' Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Alcoholism Services of Anaconda-Deer Lodge Director: Don Simpson Beaverhead County Southwest Chemical Dependency Program Program Director: Dave Blodget ' Broadwater County Boyd Andrew Community Services Broadwater County Alcohol Services ' Contact: Ron Shaw Butte-Silver Bow County ' Butte-Silver Bow Chemical Dependency Services Director: Ralph Boemer ' Montana Chemical Dependency Services Director: Dave Peshak North American Indian Alliance Acadia,Inc. Granite County None ' Jefferson County Boyd Andrew Community Services/Jefferson County Alcohol Services Contact: Ron Napierala ' Elkhorn Treatment Center for Women Madison County ' Southwest Montana Chemical Dependency Program Contact: Bob Clarkson ' Powell County Western Montana Addiction Service Development Director: Don Simpson Treasure State Correctional Training Center Contact: Dan Burden ' State Prison Chemical Dependency Program Contact: Blair Hopkins Source: Montana Department of Health and Human Services, Alcohol and Drug Services, Helena Montana Family day care homes offer a home-like atmosphere and flexible schedules in a loosely ' structured environment with a ratio of one caregiver to a maximum of six children including the provider's own. The provider is required to be registered with the State of Montana. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 75 1 Group day care homes are settings where two adults care for a maximum of twelve children. Care is often provided in a private home and shares many of the qualities of a family home. The providers are required to be registered with the State of Montana. Day care centers care for thirteen or more children in a more structured environment, offer a variety of educational and recreational activities, and hours that normally coincide ' with regular working hours. These centers are also required to be licensed. Preschools are generally part-day programs established chiefly for educational purposes. , Preschools in Montana are not regulated. Community Coordinated Child Care, 4'Cs, located in Butte, provides assistance to ' parents seeking childcare and to childcare providers in Beaverhead, Butte-Silver Bow, Deer Lodge, Granite, Madison and Powell Counties. Child Care Partnership, located in Helena,provides the same services for Jefferson County. ' Infrastructure Funding Assistance Most communities must obtain financial assistance to construct new or upgrade existing ' infrastructure facilities,because relying on the issuance of debt alone can exceed the local , government's ability to pay. This is particularly true for `enterprise fund' departments such as water or sewer, where revenue is derived primarily from user charges. General fund or mil levy-derived revenues for other departments, such as streets and roads, also ' may require augmentation of`local match' for eligibility for federal assistance. Often, multiple loan and/or grant programs are combined to assemble a viable financial A short description of available state and federal financial assistance programs package. for infrastructure follows. Typical Utility `Enterprise Fund' Assistance Programs ' State Revolving Fund (SRF) Drinking Water Loan Program - This loan program is administered cooperatively by the Montana Department of Environmental Quality t (MDEQ) and the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) for public water system improvements, including both treatment and storage/distribution. Prior to ' initiating the formal loan process, projects must be listed on the program's Project Priority Listing (PPL). The DNRC issues the State's general obligation bonds and makes the loans. Loans are made for a maximum 20-year term at 3.75 %. These rates are some ' of the most favorable available on the loan market. There is no cap on SRF loan amounts and PPL projects are funded on a `first-come, first-served' basis until demand exceeds available funds. (www.deo.mt.gov) ' State Revolving Fund (SRF) Water Pollution Control Loan Program - The Water Pollution Control SRF loan program is a similar offering by MDEQ for wastewater , system improvements. The DNRC again issues the general obligation bonds and makes Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 76 ' the loans to projects on the PPL. Rates for these loans are also 3.75% for a maximum 20- year term. (www.deq_mt.gov) Montana Treasure State Endowment Program (TSEP) — TSEP is a state-funded grant program authorized by the Montana Legislature. It is designed to assist cities, towns, ' counties, consolidated governments, tribal governments, and county or multi-county water, sewer or solid waste districts in funding wastewater systems, drinking water systems, sanitary or storm sewers, solid waste disposal and separation facilities, and ' bridges. Administered by the Montana Department of Commerce (MDOC), TSEP grant awards are competitive and subject to legislative approval. Funding availability is typically $10-12 million per biennium, derived from coal severance tax revenues. ' Individual grant awards are limited to 50 percent of the project cost with a grant cap of $750,000. TSEP applications are evaluated, scored and ranked based upon eight statutory priorities. Generally, projects that solve serious health and safety threats and have a serious financial need are ranked higher. (www.leg.mt.gov) t Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program - The CDBG program is state- administered, with federal funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The application cycles are annual and qualifying projects in the ' `public facilities' category include water, wastewater, and solid waste improvements. There are companion CDBG programs for housing improvements and for economic development. ' All CDBG applicants must document that at least 51 percent of the non-administrative funds requested for a project will benefit low- and moderate-income families. The ' CDBG program can award up to a maximum of $450,000 per project. Grants are competitive and a high percentage of low- and moderate-income benefit, and the presence of potential health threats, helps a community's ranking. CDBG grants can be ' applied to qualifying project administrative, engineering, and construction costs. Planning grants are also available for project initiation, through an annual competition. (www.comdev.mt.gov) DNRC Renewable Resource Grant and Loan (RRGL) Program — This grant and loan program is administered by the Montana DNRC. While RRGL grants are limited to $100,000, there is no limit for the loans. Eligible projects are water related, although wastewater improvements mitigating threats to water resources are also eligible. Funding is available on a first-come, first-served and biannual basis, subject to legislative ' approval. It is unique to the RRGL program that local match is not mandatory, other than for Project Planning Grants. Grants and/or loans can be obtained for capital construction, including engineering and administration. (www.dnrc.mt.gov) iMontana Board of Investments INTERCAP Loan Program — The Montana Board of Investments offers a short-term loan program to communities and districts. These ' INTERCAP loans are not limited to water and sewer improvements, and may be used for other capitalization needs such as vehicles, road paving, building improvements, as well as interim cash flow. Loan requests of more than $1,000,000 require Board approval. 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 77 1 The interest rate for 2007 is 4.85% and the five-year interest rate average is 3.79%. INTERCAP loans are often used for interim financing in infrastructure improvement projects to allow project initiation, prior to final loan closing or grant funds availability. ' Applications for INTERCAP loans are on an open cycle. (www.investment.com) USDA Rural Development Programs ' The Housing and Community Facilities Programs makes direct loans to nonprofit and public entities for the construction of essential facilities. Most loans are made at belo w- ' market interest rates and are aimed at serving financially challenged rural areas. Allowed expenses include purchase of land needed for construction of the facility, necessary ' professional fees, and equipment and operating costs. Water and Environmental Programs (W E P) provides loans, grants and loan guarantees , for drinking water, sanitary sewer, solid waste and storm drainage facilities in rural areas and cities and towns of 10,000 or less. Public bodies, non-profit organizations and recognized Indian tribes may qualify for assistance. W E P also makes grants to nonprofit ' organizations to provide technical assistance and training to assist rural communities with their water, wastewater, and solid waste problems. Other Infrastructure Funding Assistance Programs ' Community Transportation Enhancement Program (CTEP) Grants — The Montana , Department of Transportation (MDT), in conjunction with the Federal Highway Administration, offers CTEP grants for transportation related improvements. Grants are typically awarded for peripheral improvements related to street and highway systems, ' including sidewalks, bike paths, trails, curb and gutter, right-of-way beautification, and lighting. Storm drainage improvements are specifically excluded. (www.rndt.mt.gov Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Grants — FEMA offers federal aid , grants in response to federally designated disasters. These grants are also offered for qualifying preventative (deterrence) projects such as drainage control or flood protection. , Such grants typically require documented demonstration of need and beneficial effect, and are discretionary with the agency, subject to available federal funding. (www.fema.aov) Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Grants—The FAA administers a program to fund public airport improvements using aviation fuel tax dollars. This lucrative grant program ' typically provides 90 percent of eligible project costs for airport reconstruction and expansion. The Montana Aeronautics Division also has supplemental loans and grants for qualifying applications to help defray the 10 percent local match requirement. FAA grants encourage preparation and approval of an Airport Layout Plan as a prelude to project funding. FAA also offers grants for airport master planning. (www.faa.gov) Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 78 ' 1 Local Debt and Bonding A portion of capital improvement costs must often be generated through borrowing. Also, most financial assistance programs require some type of local match for grant funds. Other than public agency loans, such as those available through the SRF program, ' municipalities have three primary mechanisms by which Montana Statutes allow the incurrence of debt. ' General Obligation Bonds — General Obligation (GO) bonds require approval through a vote of the area's registered owners. This type of financing does not require a debt reserve to be placed on deposit, nor the collection of excess debt coverage. Bonds are ' backed by real property, based on its taxable valuation. All property owners would contribute to repayment of the bond through property taxes, whether served by the new ' infrastructure improvement or not. GO bond issuance procedures are specified by State Law, and aggregate GO bond ' indebtedness is statutorily limited based on the local government's tax base. Twenty- eight percent of taxable value of property subject to taxation is allowed for municipalities, 11.25 percent for counties, and 39 percent for city-county consolidated governments. Greater GO capacity is allowed exclusively for water and sewer system construction, up to 55 percent for municipalities and 49 percent for consolidated governments. ' GO bond financing has wide application, but is not as typical where user revenues (rate base) are generated by a utility. In those cases, revenue bond issues are more common. GO bonds are rated and sold on the investment market, and generally garner higher ratings (and lower interest rates) than revenue bonds. ' Revenue Bonds—Revenue bonds are secured by the pledging of user charges to repay the bond debt. Revenue bonds are the typical debt instrument for utility improvements where a user rate base exists, such as with water or sewer systems. Revenue bonds require the ' collection of excess coverage, which means that 125 percent of the annual debt service must be collected and that additional money must be placed in reserve. Revenue bond repayment is only borne by utility users, generating rate-based revenue to repay the bond. ' Revenue bonds may be issued through a resolution of the governing body, therefore, an election is not required. Interest rates for revenue bonds are subject to the raring and sale ' of the bond on the investment market, and in recent years have been in the 6 +/- %2 percent range. Smaller utilities and communities typically garner lower bond ratings resulting in comparatively higher rates. ' Special Improvement Districts (SID) Bonds — Where capital improvements can be demonstrated to benefit a specific group of property owners, a SID can be created and a ' special assessment bond issued. SID assessments can be used for a variety of improvements such as roads, water and sewer, and may include assessments for ongoing Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 79 1 maintenance. SID financing must be approved by the majority of the affected property 1 owners through an election,petition, or protest opportunity. SID bonding is repaid through property assessments within the District and is guaranteed , by liens created on the benefited properties. Due to a typically smaller property base involved in a SID issue, bond ratings and interest rates may be less favorable. Public support for SID issues can be a plus given that assessments are limited to only those property owners directly benefiting from the improvements. (www.investorguide.corn) Planning Activities Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. serves as the organization for regional planning in the ' eight-county area. Headwaters brings together the local entities involved in planning and economic development. These include city, town, and county governments, state and federal agencies, Chambers of Commerce, local development corporations, organization, Gold West Country, the Montana Economic Developers Association, businesses and ' landowners. The goal for Headwaters RC&D is to assure that its Area Plan remains a viable resource for the region. Keeping the Area Plan Current ' This dynamic plan of action is updated periodically to meet the changing needs and conditions of the area. Major revisions will be considered only to update area goals, policies or actions. Official action by the Board of Directors will be taken to make needed changes. ' All projects will be reviewed annually. Inactive and unfeasible proposals will be deleted from the Area Plan. As new projects are adopted by the Board, they will be incorporated , in the annual Work Plans. The Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. annual work plan is based on the needs of the area as , identified by the Board of Directors through its committee and public outreach efforts and reflects the Board's efforts to balance the need for planning and the need for project implementation. ' The work plan encourages planning that recognizes the current situation, takes a look at trends, and helps communities plan for future needs. By looking at the population trends ' over the last five years, and the projections for future growth in the area, communities can better assess their public infrastructure needs and make the best use of technical and financial resources. , Headwaters RC&D/EDD's planning and project implementation activities will influence the fixture by improving regional economic conditions through coordinated natural ' resource and community/economic planning and development efforts. It will assist local governments in planning public works and coordinating public and private investment, Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 80 , 1 and through research,planning, and advisory functions, will assist in the attainment of the area's goals and objectives. Helping these communities to reach their goals and objectives are a variety of federal and state resource agencies. ' Federal ' USDA Forest Service, USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service; Department of Public Health and Human Services; Department of Public Health, Housing and Urban Development (HUD); Department of the ' Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Federal Highway Administration; Department of ' Transportation Federal Aviation Administration; Department of Commerce Small Business Administration, Economic Development Administration; Environmental Protection Agency, USDA Extension ' Service; Offices of Senators Max Baucus and Jon Tester, and Congressman Dennis Rehberg. ' State Department of Commerce; Department of Fish Wildlife and Parks; Department of Environmental Quality; Department of Transportation; State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO); Department of Labor and Industry; Department of State Lands; Department of Natural Resources ' and Conservation; Department of Justice — Natural Resource Damage Program; Office of Public Instruction; Department of Public Health and Human Services; and Montana University System. ' I Pescription of Challenges Opportunities Area-Wide ' The opportunities in southwest Montana for development are abundant. The challenge is to recognize the opportunities and have the foresight and knowledge to turn opportunity ' into reality. The State of Montana, through the Governor's Office of Economic Development and working with local and regional economic development organizations, has established programs to overcome the shortage of capital in Montana. New industries can benefit by ' legislation that makes business tax credits available for job creation and entrepreneurs starting small businesses can participate in a MicroBusiness Finance Program sponsored by the State. Other local and regional revolving loan funds funded through federal or Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 81 local programs provide gap financing for new or expanding businesses throughout the 1 region.. There is a perception, with a degree of reality, that Montana is geographically isolated , and transportation costs to some major markets are prohibitive. The Port of Montana, located at Silver Bow, has opened up north/south and east/west markets via the ' intermodal access to the major interstates and transcontinental rail carriers. The Port offers businesses the opportunity to access new markets at competitive rates. Sun Mountain Limber Company purchased the Louisiana Pacific Lumber mill located in ' Powell County in 2004, thus saving 241 jobs and a tax base of $96,000 per year for the area. Sun Mountain also provides jobs for over 100 contract loggers in the area. The challenge for the next five years is to maintain Sun Mountain's competitiveness in the international lumber supply industry and ensure its sustainability. Sun Mountain does ' utilize the Port of Montana to ship product. As the charts and maps have shown the Headwaters region is a major producer of cattle. ' Montana and especially SW Montana is famous for the quality and safety of its beef. Historically, the area's beef has been shipped to feed lots and packing plants in the mid- west with no value-added in Montana. There are currently initiatives in Beaverhead and Madison Counties to develop a niche market for SW Montana natural and/or organic beef. The Headwaters region has a real opportunity to develop a specialty beef processing facility and a marketing cooperative that will add value to its beef industry ' and make the cattle ranches more sustainable. Transportation of the product and solid waste is critical to the success of the effort. The Tax Increment Finance Industrial District (TIFID) in Silver Bow houses REC Group ' who acquired ASiMI in 2005. REC employs over 300 people. Silicon is one of three capabilities REC markets around the world, the other two being solar cell and wafer , products. Transportation is again a vital aspect of RFC's ability to remain competitive and in the Headwaters area. The tax increment financing and funding from EDA and the State of Montana have provided Butte-Silver Bow with the ability to provide the needed , infrastructure to the Industrial Park. Butte-Silver Bow is actively recruiting other industries to the Industrial Park. Other counties/communities looking at industrial parks should consider whether or not tax increment financing could benefit their efforts. ' Tourism is a growing industry in southwestern Montana. While this offers opportunities for the development of new small businesses and even major resorts, it also causes ' concerns among residents as to how to preserve the quality of life and conserve/protect natural resources from unregulated development. The other concern discussed in the "HOUSUNG" section is a community's ability to provide workforce appropriate housing , for service workers. Communities with a significant tourism industry could vote for a resort tax and potentially use a portion of that tax to develop infrastructure or other mechanisms to address housing needs. , Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 82 Like most rural areas, the Headwaters RC&D area's economy is based on natural resources. This dependence has caused the economy to follow the cycles associated with ' agriculture, mining and timber. The opportunity and challenge is to create a value-added, diverse economy that is not dependent on just one industry and that will develop strong markets for its value-added products. ' Because of a strong natural resource base throughout the region, resource management decisions at all levels of government substantially impact the area. State and federal land ' is available for recreational uses, mining, timber, and permit grazing. Much of the work force is employed by businesses which are direct users of federal lands and the cattle and timber industries depend on federal and state use permits. It will remain incumbent upon ' local governments, development organizations, the RC&D, and everyone involved in resource management and community/economic development to have a voice in the ' planning that is the basis for decision making. ' Local Opportunities and Challenges Anaconda-Deer Lodge County t Anaconda lies adjacent to the largest Superfund i site in the world and is still faced with years of remedial cleanup. This continues to be deterrent to development and the City-County suffers from a low-tax base. Cleanup work has ' generated some long-term employment in the area and resulted in the creation of the "Old Works" golf course, a world-class course ' designed by Jack Nickalus. This kind of activity leads to opportunities for additional Anaconda-Deer Lodge Courthouse tourism/visitor growth in the area and also a Anaconda, MT cleaner, more inviting community in which to attract and keep businesses in the basic sector. A restoration fund established by the Montana Department of Justice's Natural Resource Damage Program as a result of partial settlement of claims asserted in a lawsuit filed by the State of Montana against ARCO for damages to natural resources in the river basin due to mining and smelting has helped financed many projects designed to restore, rehabilitate, replace, or acquire the equivalent of the injured natural resources within the area. Anaconda's resurgence as a visitor and recreation community has created a heightened awareness of the historic, cultural and aesthetic resources in the area. Inclusion in the National Labor History Historic District running from Butte to Anaconda, the addition of a Main Street Program and the efforts of community businesses such as BA&P ' Railways' excursion train, the Copper King Express, have all contributed to the Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 83 revitalization efforts in and around Anaconda. Anaconda's history and its proximity to Georgetown Lake, wilderness areas, blue-ribbon trout streams, mountain recreation and developed resorts are attractions for potential visitors. The unprecedented development , at Georgetown Lake presents and opportunity for local planners to examine both the opportunities and challenges that this will present over the next 5 years and to take a proactive planning approach. ' Anaconda also serves as a `bedroom' community for the surrounding area's industry. A traditional hometown atmosphere, a solid infrastructure of services and a position on the doorstep of a major wilderness area give Anaconda the potential to attract businesses and retirees.. The lifestyle has been a crucial factor in attracting home-based businesses and those that are not dependent on a specific location. 1 Anaconda-Deer Lodge has a successful history of providing specialized care through the State Mental Hospital in Warm Springs and the Reintegrating Youthful Offenders (RYO) ' Correctional Facility in Galen. The continued growth of the local Job Corps Center and the strength and expansion of AWARE's services to the developmentally disabled offer ' stability to the area, both in services and employment. The health care and social assistance industry is currently the number one employment sub-sector in Deer Lodge County. , Because of Anaconda's location near the crossroads of Interstates 90 and 15, rail service and the Port of Montana, the community is in a position to act as a warehousing and ' distribution point as well as a service point for the trucking industry. Smaller, light manufacturing plants have developed around the community, many based , on technologies already available in the area. Additional business might be fostered if appropriate markets can be developed. New amenities in the community will attract new , individuals and businesses in the visitor industry, as well as `lone eagles' and small manufacturers. A large segment of Anaconda's economy depends on ® t retired individuals and other recipients of transfer payments. The community is considering how it � ' might capitalize on this aspect of the economy. Beaverhead County = ± Agriculture is the economic base of Beaverhead ' County and the county is the top cattle-producing coon hin Montana.a. This historic reliance on a single n Beaverhead County Courthouse house industry has prompted the local officials to take Dillon MT I measures to solidify and diversify the economic base. t Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 84 , 1 As the largest city in Beaverhead County and more than sixty miles from another major city, Dillon is the economic center for the county. Lima is the only other incorporated ' community in Beaverhead County. Other communities include: Dell, Glen, Jackson, Polaris, Wisdom, and Wise River. Dillon is home to the University of Montana-Western and Barrett Hospital and Healthcare. Barrett Minerals, one of the world's largest talc ' mines, is also in Beaverhead County. KCI, a processor of MediCare claims and provider of other health care related services has an office in Dillon that employees over 100 people. The Challenge for Dillon is to develop is downtown parking to accommodate the ' growth and to ensure that its infrastructure keeps pace with the demand. Like almost every community in SW MT, Dillon is experiencing a shortage of housing in all income levels, but especially in the more affordable markets. Dillon is undertaking a major ' housing study that will be complete in 2008. The challenge will be how to address the findings. ' Future planning to enhance small business growth and tourism and recreation development includes the increased development of value-added industries, i.e. beef processing. Essential to success in this endeavor are the major transportation facilities — road,rail, and air in the region. ' Progress is being made for infrastructure and road improvements throughout the county with water/sewer projects in Wisdom, Dillon, and Lima and major road work has been accomplished in Dillon. Maintenance of the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial sites for future ' tourism activity was a top priority voiced by citizens at a planning meeting.. While many specialty and niche business opportunities have been identified, marketing ' and product development are still challenges and concerns about the rate of growth and its effect on resource conservation are of great importance to the people in this county. 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 85 Broadwater County ' Cooperative efforts between the city and , county governments, the local development corporation, Townsend Chamber of Commerce and numerous ' civic groups continue to have significant impact on the economy and resource development and conservation. ' Townsend and the outlying unincorporated ' communities in the county have become "bedroom" communities for Helena. While Broadwater County Courthouse this brings increased property taxes, it also Townsend,MT ' increased the need for public services. A county "weed seed free hay" program has the potential to access national and international markets. With the abundance of hay and lumber mill by-products, a multi- use pellet plant would enhance product value and increase revenue. High quality hay products would support viable diary farms. Alternative crops such as canola, and market , assessment and promotion of basic and value-added agricultural products provide areas of potential growth. The Townsend School District has taken the innovative step of installing a wood pellet ' biomass heating system for both its elementary and high school. This system went on- line in the Spring 2007. , The Missouri Headwaters State Park is located in the south-east comer of Broadwater County. This park encompasses the confluence of the Jefferson, Madison and Gallatin ' Rivers. Lewis and Clark anticipated this important headwaters all the way up the Missouri River. The Missouri then runs north through Broadwater County to Canyon Ferry Reservoir, a portion of which lies in Broadwater County. An aggressive marketing ' and promotional campaign could produce significant results in recreational development which would in- turn support small business development. Butte-Silver Bow County Butte-Silver Bow is geographically central to 1 ' the eight-county region and is the largest urban area in the District. As Montana's once-largest ' city, and located at the Interstate 90 and 15 crossroads, Butte has the potential for considerable commercial growth. , Butte-Silver Bow Courthouse Butte,MT Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 86 Established as a copper-mining boomtown, Butte continues to mine but has also diversified its economy into areas such as: health care services, retail trade, utilities, ' education, and technology based industries. As part of the largest Superfund site in the nation, state-of-the-art cleanup technologies ' are a priority for Butte-Silver Bow. The University of Montana at Montana Tech and many technological companies provide an extensive knowledge base in the community and have the potential to spin-off other high- tech industrial opportunities. Clean-up efforts present an opportunity to really beautify the community and work to make Butte, what the Chief Executive has referred to as, "one of the most livable cities in Montana". ' Because of its rich history, Butte-Silver Bow has worked hard to develop a successful heritage tourism industry. As one of the largest landmark historic districts in the country (its Labor History designation also encompasses Anaconda), the community has ' thousands of structures designated as part of the Butte Historic Landmark District and listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Mansions of the Copper Kings along with worker cottages dot the Butte Hill. ' Butte is actively building its reputation as `the city of festivals'. The ongoing success of the An Ri' Ra' Irish Festival and explosive growth of Evel Knievel Days were deciding ' factors when Butte was awarded the National Folk Festival for the 2008-2010 seasons. Butte-Silver Bow's transportation system creates tremendous potential, not only in Butte, ' but throughout the area for attracting further industrial development, The access to the two major interstates, service from two transcontinental rail carriers, and the Port of Montana intermodal hub, as well as Bert Mooney Airport's pursuit of a Foreign Trade ' Zone designation, make the county and area ripe for future growth. Granite County Granite County is experiencing growth, particularly in ' the second home market. Development of high-end homes at Georgetown Lake is receiving the most - attention and presents unique opportunities and challenges for both Granite and Deer Lodge counties. ` m� Granite County continues to diversify its economy. Granite County Courthouse ' The County is rich in precious minerals and forests, Phillipsburg,MT and agriculture is a strong component. Raising cattle, and hay and grain production are the major mainstays yet there is a fast developing ' recreation economy. Some land use is shifting from agricultural to tracts used for rural living or as recreational sites. The two main population centers in the county are Drummond and Philipsburg. The unincorporated community of Hall lies along the Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 87 corridor of Montana Highway #1, where a good deal of subdivision development is occurring. The presence of the T1 line encourages cyber-commuters to locate in the county. ' The town of Philipsburg has been designated as a National Historic District, and has been awarded the distinction of being one of"America's Prettiest Painted Places'. It possesses ' an intact historical character that is being developed and successfully marketed. A new hockey/skating rink constructed through the efforts of community members, and the local Rotary Club, along with an expansion of Discovery Ski area runs, is driving a concerted ' effort to attract winter recreation business. The Georgetown Lake area continues to attract winter and summer visitors and the surrounding area offers widespread outdoor recreational opportunities. A mining museum has been added to the Granite County ' Museum and Cultural Center to interpret the town's early mining. Drummond is known as `Home of the World Famous Bull Shippers'. Located off I-90, it ' is the northwest gateway of the Pintlar Scenic Route. Though the population has remained relatively small, the local municipality has recently added a new softball field to the community park. The town also continues with its wastewater system project to , better serve the communi ty. Jefferson County Jefferson County is nestled between three major Montana cities: Helena, Butte, and ' Bozeman and is one of two counties in the state (Silver Bow is the other) that has both Interstate 90 and Interstate 15 passing through its boundaries. Jefferson County is one of ' the few counties in the Headwaters region that is experiencing growth, fueled by the growth of communities outside its border and an increase in mining activity. Jefferson County has two population centers, , Whitehall and Boulder, along with the smaller unincorporated communities of: Basin, ' Cardwell, Clancy, Jefferson City, and Montana City. Jefferson County has addressed economic development head-on with a county-wide Economic Development Corporation and a full-time Economic Development Director. d, Jefferson County's economy has historically ' - been resource based production agriculture, ' wood products and mining, but is diversifying to include more health care and social services Jefferson County Courthouse industries. The Golden Sunlight Mine near , Boulder,MT Whitehall and Montana Tunnels near Boulder are major economic factors in the County. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 88 ' Both, however, have limited ore bodies. This fact reemphasizes the need for diversification. ' The Boulder South Campus, owned and managed by the Jefferson Local Development Corporation, has been a focal point of redevelopment over the past five years and houses ' the Alternative Youth Adventures (AYA), operated by Youth Dynamics, Inc. AYA has proven to be an important part of Boulder and Jefferson County and is undergoing an expansion to open three more group homes on the campus. Elkhorn Treatment Center, a facility for methamphetamine-addicted women opened in the spring of 2007 just south of the South Boulder Campus. It has a staff of twenty-four ' and is operated by Boyd Andrews Community Services of Helena. Housing for the employees of AYA and Elkhorn Treatment Center is a challenge facing Boulder. ' Jefferson County is also well known for its Radon Health Mines, where thousands of visitors seek relief from pain of a variety of ailments, ranging from arthritis to ' emphysema, cataracts, and others. Because Jefferson County offers a multitude of outdoor activity options, efforts have also ' been focused toward further development of the tourism industry. The availability of two Interstate highways renders tourism a logical pursuit and bodes ' well for light industrial, warehousing and transportation development as well. ' Madison County Madison County has traditionally relied ' on agriculture, mining, and other natural resources for its economy. Because of its scenic beauty, Madison County is l experiencing an increased interest in land J purchases and development for non- agricultural uses. In fact, construction is currently the number one sub-sector in the county, due in part to the massive development to the Big Sky area which lies on the north-eastern edge of the county. This area alone provides 55% of - f Madison County's tax base. It should be ' recognized that the new housing is almost AN: "+ entirely for "Trophy Homes" and is not �- ' workforce appropriate housing. The challenge is to find a balance between the Madison County Courthouse opportunities for economic development Virginia City,MT presented by developments for the ultra- Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 89 rich and the needs of the service workers and those living in the balance of the County. The geothermal properties and wind in the county provide opportunities for ' development of alternative energy sources. Value-added industries are also being explored to enhance the economic well-being of the county. With historic Virginia City as its county seat, Madison County enjoys a healthy tourism ' industry. In addition to many historic sites in the county, the proximity to Yellowstone National Park and the Big Sky Resort area, other recreational opportunities include the ' Madison River, a blue-ribbon trout stream and great hunting in the mountain ranges throughout the area. Madison County is unique in that it does not have a large population center. Although , Virginia City is the county seat, Ennis is the most populous town with under 1,000 ' residents. Sheridan, Twin Bridges are the other incorporated communities, with Cameron, Alder, Harrison, Pony, and Silver Star rounding out the unincorporated communities. , The towns in Madison County face numerous infrastructure and services issues and must plan for and solve them with the added constraint that an ever-increasing number of ' residents only live in Montana for part of the year. Madison County has an active planning department and a County Economic ' Development Corporation that operate to guide and direct the current and continuing growth of Madison County. 1 Powell County ' i!! Powell County is one of the most historical counties in Montana and home to the most ' concentrated number of museums and historical collections in the northwest. The city of Deer , Lodge and Powell County have devoted a great deal of effort to promoting the historical significance of the area. The - - Montana Territorial Prison in Deer Lodge was built by inmate ' labor and began operation in 1871. Prisoners moved to the new Montana State Prison just , Powell County Courthouse outside of town in the late 1970s Deer Lodge,MT and the Old Prison has become a Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 90 , popular historical and tourist destination. Also in Deer Lodge is the historic Grant Kohrs Ranch, a National Park site operated by the U.S. Department of Interior. It is home to ' 23,000 artifacts and operates as a working ranch where visitors can participate in life as it was in the mid 1880s. ' As is the case in many of the counties in the Headwaters region, Powell County's economy is largely based on agriculture, accentuated by the economic impact from the Sun Mountain Lumber mill and logging operations. ' Sun Mountain employs 238 people and supports another 100 contact loggers. The inter- national market for lumber combined with on-going supply issues make it imperative that ' Sun Mountain Lumber Inc. remain competitive. Management is currently investing over a million dollars in technology to assist in that endeavor. ' Montana State Prison is the largest employer in the county at 600 people. Deer Lodge wrestles with its identity as a `prison town'. While the economic impact of MSP is ' appreciated, there are concerns that economic development is hindered because of its presence. Powell County's economy lacks diversification in manufacturing and retail businesses. Though the cost of living is less than in surrounding areas, opportunities for development are limited by sparse population and remoteness. Value-adding and specialty businesses ' would help stabilize the county's economy. Reclamation activities associated with the Superfund also extend into Powell County ' yielding the same obstacles and opportunities as discussed for Anaconda Deer Lodge and Butte-Silver Bow. 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 91 Section 3: Public Participation ! Over the last twelve (12) months the Headwaters Board of Directors, the RC&D ! Coordinator, and the Headwaters Staff have been actively working with the RC&D s sponsors to determine local and region-wide resource conservation and development ! needs. Nineteen local public meetings attended by 746 citizens were held over the course of the ! a year to determine strengths, weaknesses, needs, and priorities. Most meetings were 2- hour sessions, however, two of the meetings involved comprehensive community assessments over a two-day period. A regional meeting was then held with local ! representatives to identify common ground and the priorities for Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. The regional meeting was attended by 20 people from throughout the region who broke up into groups to discuss local concerns and needs and how those concerns ' could be addressed through a regional approach. ! Summary of findings by RC&D Program Elements The public participation process brought forth local needs and opportunities and also ! identified areas of common concern and opportunities to address those needs both locally and on an area-wide basis. The common threads at every public meeting and at the ' regional meeting were the "need for workforce appropriate housing" throughout the region, the need to add value to the areas agriculture and forestry products, and the need to develop the area's workforce to meet the changing needs of employers. The health of the public and private forests in SW MT is a continuing concern that will only magnify over the next five years. The Statement of Goals and Objectives reflects the priorities brought out in the public participation process and presents them as adopted by the Board ' of Directors. Specific projects for the region and local communities are outlined in the table following ' the Goals and Objectives. A timeframe for implementation and resources is included in the table. It is important to note that while Goals and Objectives are grouped under the Authorized ' Element felt to be the most appropriate, benefits for specific projects will often accrue in more than one of the Elements. t Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 92 ! Section 4: Goals and Objectives ' These goals which can only be achieved through local leadership, citizen participation, cooperation and a desire to improve the environment, are facilitated with the ' development and maintenance of the Headwaters Area Plan and it Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy(CEDS). These documents emerge from a continuous planning process and will assist the Headwaters RC&D Area by promoting economic development and opportunity, fostering effective transportations systems, enhancing and protecting the environment, and balancing resources through sound management of development. ' The general public within the Headwaters region, government decision-makers and ' business investors should be able to use this Plan as a guide to understand the regional economy and to take action to improve it. ' Headwaters RC&D/EDD, with the incorporation of the Area Plan process, monitors and analyzes local condition, identifies problems and opportunities, defines the vision and goals of area communities, designs the strategies to accomplish the identified goals, ' coordinates activities to implement the strategies, and evaluates and updates the process. By doing so, Headwaters is able to formulate and implement programs to create jobs, raise income levels,promote economic diversification, improve quality of life, and promote protection of the environment. Overall, this is achieved with the adoption of a logical approach to long-range development while identifying and implementing short- term problem solutions. With interactive public support, solutions to short-term problems can be immediate. Continuous public support through communication and outreach efforts not only encourages broad-based public engagement, participation and commitment of partners, but also helps maintain program momentum and viability. This continuous public support and interaction mandate that the Area Plan is a fluid document with Annual Work Plans that assess progress and adjusts for current needs. Authorized Element— Community Development • Organizational Objective: Promote the economic diversification of the area's economy through the wise use and development of human, physical, ' and natural resources. Goal: Create or retain 40 jobs per year over the next five years. ' Objective 1: Work with a minimum of twelve (12) start-up businesses and five (5) existing business a year to develop business plans, feasibility studies and/or infrastructure ' plans to support the business. Strategies: Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 93 1 ➢ Provide business technical assistance through the SBDC program to clients on 1 a circuit-rider approach. ➢ Maintain host agency status with the MT Department of Commerce and 1 continue satellite office arrangements in counties served by the SBDC. ➢ Provide outreach through a minimum of 12 workshops and/or classes annually. 1 ➢ Provide a schedule for meeting with clients and assisting with business plan development and other business related matters. ➢ Utilize Big Sky Trust Fund for feasibility and infrastructure studies for 1 eligible businesses/projects. Objective 2: Provide gap financing to five new or expanding businesses a year over the 1 next five years. Strategies: 1 ➢ Increase the Regional Revolving Loan Fund capitalization to $3 million 1 through additional funding from Rural Development, CDBG, EDA, and/or the State of MT. ➢ Outreach to underserved minority and rural groups to ensure access to 1 opportunities to business capital. Objective 3: Maintain the business retention and recruitment programs established in 1 cooperation with the State of Montana, MSU, and local cooperators. Strategies: 1 ➢ Coordinate BEAR Program with MEDA and the area's Local Development Corp. 1 ➢ Assist with a minimum of 5 business interviews per year. ➢ Sponsor the Community Business Model Program/Targeted Industries for the six participating counties. Work to ensure adequate funding. 1 ➢ Identify local and regional trade leakages and work on methods to reduce those leakages by 20%. Objective 4: Develop the infrastructure within the Headwaters area that will support 1 economic development and allow communities to meet their established goals and objectives. 1 Strategies: ➢ Provide technical assistance to communities and businesses with infrastructure 1 planning, development, funding and implementation. a. Provide technical assistance with planning, grant writing and 1 administration for basic infrastructure projects—especially water, sewer, and solid waste 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 94 1 b. Provide technical assistance to assist communities with emergency service improvements including communications, equipment, and ' facility development. C. Assist with the infrastructure developments at the Butte-Silver TIFID, the Sunlight Business Park in Whitehall, the Twin Bridges Children's ' Center, and the Boulder South Campus. Objective 5: Identify workforce development training and education needs to complement developing industries i.e. the Aerospace Industry, the Beef Processing Industry. t Strategies: ➢ Work with the Anaconda Job Corps and the College of Technology to identify potential programs and assist with curriculum development. ➢ Appoint a Headwaters representative to the MEDA Workforce Development Task Force. • Organizational Objective: Promote land use policies that serve as a guide for the future and help to combat urban sprawl, protect agricultural lands, ' promote affordable housing, and encourage redevelopment. Goal: Assist with the development and implementation of local and regional planning ' policies. Objective 1: Provide technical assistance to implement Growth Policies, Housing Plans, ' and Urban Revitalization Plans in the communities/counties and that have current plans and assist communities/counties without plans to develop them as needed. t Strategies: ➢ Train staff on funding opportunities and requirements of funding sources for both implementation and development. ' ➢ Actively work with selected communities to educate them on opportunities and provide technical assistance for accessing those opportunities. ➢ Utilize RC&D Board and Committee meetings to network and share ' information and to provide information that addresses the organizational objective for sustainable development. ➢ Convene a Task Force to look at common affordable housing goals and develop a plan to address on a regional level. ➢ Work with communities in revitalizing and developing their downtown, commercial, and industrial areas ' a. Work with the State of Montana in developing and implementing a statewide Main Street Program. b. Provide education on tax credits and incentives for historic preservation that will assist with business development efforts. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 95 1 ➢ Assist local communities with Superfund, Natural Resource Damages, Brownfields, and other programs in the redevelopment of environmentally damaged areas. ' a. Work with Anaconda-Deer Lodge County to develop a reuse plan for the Mill Creek area that includes subdividing. • Organizational Objective: Work with communities to develop , programs/projects that will enhance the quality of life for residents and visitors. Goal: Provide a minimum of ten (10) First Time Homebuyer Education classes a year. Objective 1: Maintain trained and qualified staff to conduct the classes. ' Strategies: ➢ Send personnel to appropriate training and participate in quarterly meetings held by MHN. ' ➢ Maintain a list of qualified volunteers to present at classes. Objective 2: Assist communities with the development and/or implement of community ' beautification and/or social enhancement projects. Strategies: ' ➢ Work with a minimum of 5 communities to implement park improvements, trail construction or enhancement, fairground improvements, or other projects as approved by the Board. Authorized Element—Land Conservation Organizational Objective: Promote projects that address the reduction of erosion or sedimentation. Goal: Sponsor Programs that increase the effectiveness of weed management in the area and reduce the number of infested acres by 20% in weed management areas. Objective 1: Provide leadership and coordination for multi-county/multi-state noxious weed management projects. Strategies: ➢ Submit Statewide Dyer's Woad Program for 2008 and ensuing years and administer grants if funded. t ➢ Serve as Coordinating entity for the State Dyer's Woad Task Force. ➢ Work with Beaverhead , Missoula, Butte-Silver Bow, Park and Gallatin Counties to ensure control of dyer's woad,monitoring and treating a ' minimum of 350 acres annually. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 1007 Area Plan Page 96 ' ➢ Provide support for three (3) community education events in the Big Hole Watershed each summer. Monitor and treat a minimum of 2,000 acres annually. ➢ Work with local Watershed Committees and other groups to expand community education days to at least one additional watershed. ' ➢ Strengthen communications and relationships with Idaho High Country and Bitterroot and Northern Rockies RC&D's to promote intrastate and interstate weed management. a. Hold two Interstate Spray Days and 3 multi-county spray days. Coordinate with High Country Bitterroot and Northern Rockies RC&D's. Monitor and treat 900 acres annually. ' b. Work with the Barrier Zone Project especially for the Dyer's Woad Project to implement educational and innovative weed control measures.. ➢ Sponsor a Big Game Hunting Season Car Wash in Butte and Anaconda and assist other organizations interested in sponsoring Car Washes and provide educational materials to 200 persons annually. Organizational Objective: Promote the quality use and protection of land through ' education, planning, and wise development and conservation. Goal: Create defensible space that benefits 1,000 acres of private land in 2008 and ' thereafter adjust acreage as funding levels permit and address 3,000 acres of private forest impacted by the pine beetle over a five year period. ' Objective 1: Seek and administer defensible space funds from the USDA Forest Service and the DOI-BLM. ' Strategies: ➢ Maintain contract(s)with Project Coordinator(s)to provide assistance to private landowners. ➢ Work with MT DNRC to establish forest health programs that will address the beetle killed and infested private forests. Objective 2. Assist with the development of one (1) forest stewardship area. Strategies: ' ➢ Assist with the projects on private land that complement the public land practices, i.e., noxious weed management and reduction of hazardous fuels. Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 1007 Area Plan Page 97 Authorized Element — Land Management ' Organizational Objective: Promote the quality use and protection of natural resources through education, planning, sustainable development and conservation. Goal: Work with two communities to develop cost-effective alternative energy ' programs, i.e. biomass, wind. Objective 1: Assist with the development of alternative energy projects for both ' public and private use. Strategies: ' ➢ Assist the Deer Lodge School System find funding for the Fuels for Schools Program. ' ➢ Monitor Philipsburg, Townsend& Dillon projects and keep abreast of needs for biomass materials ➢ Provide information on training opportunities in alternative energy and ' technology development to Board and committee members and publish information in quarterly newsletters. Objective 2: Assist with market based conservation initiatives that provide ' landowners with new and/or continuing economic opportunities. Strategies: ' ➢ Work with the National Carbon Offset Coalition to develop projects in southwest Montana including reforestation, community forestry, or agro- ' forestry. ➢ Co-sponsor seven(7) informational workshops on carbon sequestration opp ortunities. ' ➢ Educate staff, Board, and committees on potential of conservation easements and develop relationship with Montana Land Alliance Objective 3: Assist with the development of value-added agriculture/forest products ' that will provide land owners with more sustainable income. Strategies: ➢ Assist with the development of small-diameter wood products. ➢ Coordinate with the US Forest Products Lab to disseminate new technologies ' that may be appropriate for commercialization. ➢ Work with businesses/communities to ensure access to raw materials as applicable. , ➢ Use available business development services and financing programs to assist value-added businesses and coordinate with other agencies and organizations to make use of business incentives or other business development ' opportunities, i.e. Beef Processing Plant in Beaverhead County. ➢ Develop an internet based virtual Fanner's Market. 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 98 ' 1 Goal: Plant 250 trees over the five year period through community forestry projects. Objective 1: The RC&D Forester will work with communities to identify community forestry needs. Strategies: ➢ Prioritize needs and develop plans to address those needs. ' ➢ Work with Superfund impacted communities to develop and implement tree plans for trail systems or other public areas where remedial activities have taken place. Authorized Element—Water Quality Organizational Objective: Identify and remediate problems that affect the quality and quantity of both ground and surface water. Goal: Work with county governments and conservation districts to address water quality issues identified in their annual work plans. ' Objective 1: Complete a study of the uranium problem in ground water in Jefferson County. ' Strategies: ➢ Work with USGS, Jefferson County, and Mile High Conservation District to t obtain funding for a comprehensive study of the uranium in the ground water, i.e. DNRC Renewable Resource Grant. ➢ If study determines need, seek funding for private property owners to mitigate ' uranium contamination of drinking water. Objective 2: Work with communities to identify and find solutions to infrastructure problems (most commonly wastewater treatment facilities)that either are or have the potential to contaminate ground or surface water. ' Strategies: ➢ Work with two communities to obtain funding for PER's and then for construction. (also see Community Development Section) ' Goal: Work with the Big Hole Watershed Committee, the Natural Resource Committee and others on water storage related issues. ' ➢ Co-sponsor public meeting to discuss drought related issues for the Big Hole Watershed and potential for water storage. ➢ Depending on interest, convene water storage task force. 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 99 Section 5: Implementation Plan The Headwaters RC&D/EDD and its member communities and organizations have identified important program activities and proposed an implementation schedule for ' each one. hi this section, the approved activities are described, along with the identified range of public,private and non-profit support for each. Each year, this section will be evaluated for project progress and any changes in priorities. The Annual Work Plan will ' address changes to the implementation plan as presented. Table 30 presents the implementation plan for regional and counties projects. Included is ' the Authorized Element that each project is thought to best address,when implementation is expected to occur, number of potential jobs, and the anticipated resource needs. ' Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan Authorized Element: A) Community Development: B) Land Conservation: C) Land Management ' D) Water Quality&Quantity: Monetary Resources Or ,#of Technical Proposed Potential Assistance Goal Pro'ect/Pro ram Implementation Assistance Jobs (T.A.) ' Area Wide Regional Revolving Loan ' A Program 2008-2012 HRC&D 5/ $100,000/yr MDOC,SBA, A SBDC Program 2007-2012 local 40/ $75,000/yr. ' MSU Extension HRC&D A CBM/TargetedIndustries 2008-2012 Counties unknown $15,000 ' Treat/benefit 2,000 acres MT DNR B Drivate forest-forest health 2008-2011 HRC&D 5/yr. $400,000 MT DNRC ' Create defensible space HRC&D B that benefits 1,000 acres 2008-2009 USFS 4/yr. $400,000/yr Small Diameter Timber HRC&D,MT C Utilization-Biomass,FFS 2008-2012 DNRC,USFS 3 $800,000 , Community Weed HRC&D Awareness Spray Days Volunteers B Multi-Coup 2008-2012 Weed Districts unknown 1 $3,000/ . ' HRC&D, Dyer's Woad Task Force- Counties $20,000/an- B Statewide 2008-2012 NWTF 3/yr nually ' HRC&D, First-Time Homebuyers MHN A Classes 2008-2012 Volunteers N/A $15,000/yr Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 100 ' ' Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan Authorized Element: A) Community Development: B) Land Conservation: C) Land Management ' D) Water Quality&Quantity: Monetary Resources Or #of Technical Proposed Potential Assistance Goal Project/Program Implementation Assistance Jobs T.A. ' Business A Worksho s/FastTracg) 2008-2012 SBDC N/A $6,000 A Land Trusts-Housing 2007-2012 HRC&D unknown T.A. ' C Virtual Farmers Market 2009 HRC&D 1 $3,000 Co-Sponsor educational meetings on Carbon ' Sequestration&market- HRC&D C based conservation 2008 NCOC N/A T.A. HRC&D Co-Sponsor meetings on Watershed D potential for Water Storage 2008 Committees N/A T.A. ' Anaconda-Deer Lod a Count C Wind Energy Dev. HRC&D 2010 ADLC 10 T.A. A Courthouse Facade and MT DOT Renovation ADLC 2008-2009 HRC&D 5-20 $300,000 C Community Forestry to MT DNRC ' Complement Trail System MTDOT And Superfund activities HRC&D 2009-2010 ADLC 4 $80,000 ' A/C Planning for Industrial Development on Superfund HRC&D sites- 2008-2009 ADLC 2 550,000 • Infrastructure development ADLC at industrial site HRC&D 2010-2012 ALDC 50 $1,500,000 • BA&P Railway BA&P RR ' Expansion-including HRC&D Excursion Train 2009-2012 MTDOC 5 $100,000 ' Beaverhead County (Dillon and Lima) A Housing Study and City of Dillon Intrilementation 2008-2010 BDC,HRC&D 1 T.A, $30,000 ' • Planning for Equestrian Center 2010 UM Western unknown $30,000 A Industrial Park Planning BDC, BC, 2008-2010 HRC&D TA, $30,000 ' A Downtown Bldg Rehabilitation 2007-2009 BDC,Local TA Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 101 Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan ' Authorized Element: A) Community Development: B) Land Conservation: C) Land Management D Water Quality Quantity: Y Monetary t Resources Or '#of Technical Proposed Potential Assistance Goal Project/Program Implementation Assistance Jobs T.A. A Lima City Park City of Lima , Improvements HRC&D 2008 MTDOT unknown $20,000 C Assistance to Pole&Post ' operators with expansion & innovations 2008 5250,000 C Beef Processing Plant Local, , 2008-2010 HRC&D 25 $5,600,000 Broadwater Coun ty ' C Monitor Fuels for Schools HRC&D Project Townsend 2008-2009 School District N/A T.A. A Heritage Park HRC&D ' Improvements Park 2008-2009 Committee N/A $1,000 A 501(c)3 for Canton Church Historic HRC&D Renovation Canton Church Restoration , 2008 Committee N/A T.A. Butte-Silver Bow County A Butte AeroTec Facility MERDI ' BSB TIFID 2008-2009 HRC&D 12 $600,000 A Polysilicon Recycling MERDI , Plant Const. 2009 HRC&D 15 $6,400,000 A Wastewater Outflow Line HRC&D TA, from TIFID 208-2009 TIFID 5 $5,000,000 , A Replace Railroad Bridges to TIFID 2011-2012 TIFID unknown T.A. A Conduct Housing Needs BSB,Housing Assessment 2008-2009 Task Force 1 $30,000 , H Housing Tax Credit Program/Land Trust— Options for Affordable HRC&D Housing 2008-2010 BSB unknown T.A. , C Community Forestry Plan- Development& BSB S25,000 , Implementation 2008-2009 HRC&D S75,000 2010-2012 MT DOC I I Headwaters RC&D Area, Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 102 ' 1 Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan Authorized Element: A) Community Development: B) Land Conservation: C) Land Management ' D) Water Quality&Quantity: Monetary Resources Or #of Technical Proposed Potential Assistance Goal Project/Pro ram Implementation Assistance Jobs T.A. ' C/D Pork Processing Plant & HRC&D wastewater treatment Private 2009 BLDC 10 $6,000,000 A Yellow Ribbon Project I HRC&D Chamber of 2008 Commerce 1 $3,000 ' Granite Coun (Drummond and Phili sbur A Solid Waste Site Improvements 2010-2012 HRC&D,DEQ 2-10 TA A/C Philipsburg and Drummond City Sewer& TA Water Improvements Plans $60,000 t or Construction 2010-2012 HRC&D,DE 2-10 $4,000,000 A Granite County Lower Valley Fire District Local,Fire Improvements 2008-2009 Districts N/A B Brownsfield Grant/ Possible Park 2007-2008 EPA,HRC&D N/A TA A Granite County Memorial Hospital, Hospital Upgrade of Local, Plumbing System 2008-2010 HRC&D TA,Funding A Purchase and Improvement of Land and Parking in Drummond for Park 2009-2010 Local N/A $40,000 Jefferson County (Boulder and Whitehall A Fairgrounds improvements HRC&D, including an indoor horse Local Gov., arena JLDC, Community Groups, State, Private ' Foundation T.A. 2008-2010 Funding 1 $100,000 C Renewable energy Local Gov., development-Wind- JLDC, Whitehall Community 2009-2012 Groups TA 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 103 i Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan , Authorized Element: A) Community Development: B) Land Conservation: C) Land Management D) Water Quality&Quantity: Monetary Resources Or t#of Technical Proposed Potential Assistance Goal Proiect/Pro ram Implementation Assistance Jobs T.A. A Senior housing HRC&D ' Assessment& Local Gov., development plan JLDC, Community , Groups, Private 2008-2010 Nonprofit 1 T.A. S30,000 C Walking and biking trails Local Gov., , JLDC, Community Groups, State, Private Foundation 2008-2010 Funding,TA N/A TA,Funding • Business park development Local Gov., ' in conjunction with Golden JLDC, Sunlight Mine Community T.A. 2008-2009 Groups 80 $1,500,000 , • Business park development Local Gov., in conjunction with JLDC, Montana Tunnels mine Community TA 2009-2010 Groups 60 $1,500,000 ' • Water and Sewer Local Gov., infrastructure—Boulder JLDC, South Campus&across Community TA, ' Hwy 69 2008-2010 Groups 60 5300,000 • Work with NAHN on Local Gov., Affordable housing JLDC, ' development Boulder, Community Whitehall Groups, Private 2008-2010 Nonprofit TA • Upgrade of heating system JLDC, in community center in Community Basin 2008-2009 Groups N/A T.A. $10,000 , CL Initiate a direct sales JLDC, systems for regionally Community grown food and food Groups, ' processing(see Virtual Private T.A. Farmers Market) 2010-2012 Nonprofit, TA 20 53,000 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007 Area Plan Page 104 ' ' Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan Authorized Element: A) Community Development: B) Land Conservation: C) Land Management D) Water Quality&Quantity: Monetary Resources Or k of Technical Proposed Potential Assistance Goal Project/Program Implementation Assistance Jobs T.A. 1 B Brownsfield Local Gov., Redevelopment Studies JLDC, Community Groups, EPA, State DEQ/ Private 2009-2010 Foundations I TA, $50,000 ' D Environmental assessment Local Gov., Initial study of county's ground water 2008 complete initial JLDC, 540,000 for uranium phase Community Comprehensi 2010 initiate Groups, State ve study comprehensive study 1 $100,000 A Continued development of Local Gov„ ' Boulder South Campus JLDC, buildings Community TA, 2009-2010 Grou s, Stare 100 $2,000,000 Madison County (Ennis, Sheridan, Twin Brid es, Virginia ity and Big Sky) Local Gov., Private, TA ' Implementation of HRC&D,Non- $100,000 A Affordable Housing Plan 2008-2009 profits unknown initially Alternative Energy Local Gov., C Development wind 2008-2012 Private 20 TA$300,000 MT Bureau of Mines& TA, D Groundwater Study 2008-2009 Geology 1 $100,000 Local Watershed Planning& Conservation D Protection 2007-2012 Districts 1 unknown HRDC MTDNRC Urban Interface Fire Local Gov., B I Mitigation 2008-2012 Private 2 $120,000 Local Gov., Plan for Senior Citizen Agencies, A Housing& Services 2008-2009 Citizens 5 S30,000 ' HRC&D Redevelopment of the Local Gov., TA A/C Children's Center 2008-2012 MCEDC 50 $2,000,000 ' Sheridan downtown HRC&D improvements(Main Street Local Gov., TA, A I Program) 2008-2009 MCEDC 5 unknown Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. ' 2007 Area Plan Page 105 Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan ' Authorized Element: A) Community Development: B) Land Conservation: C) Land Management D) Water Quality&Quantity: ' Monetary Resources Or '#of Technical Proposed Potential Assistance Goal Project/Program Implementation Assistance Jobs T.A. Promote/Develop Ag , C Processing/Marketing 2009-2010 MCEDC 10 TA County Fairgrounds HRC&D Infrastructure MCEDC, TA, A/D Improvements 2007-2010 Local Group unknown MCEDC, PER'S for Sewer Systems- Local Gov., , A/D Alder,Virginia City, Ennis 2007-2010 HRC&D 2-10 TA, $90,000 Powell County (Deer Lodge) HRC&D Sun Mountain Lumber Inc. Powell Co. A Expansion 2008 MTDOC 238 $1,000,000 Plan for Development of , Airport Property for HRC&D Commercial Uses(100,000 Airport Board, A s . ft. warehouse) 2008-2009 FAA 5-100 TA$30,000 HRC&D Trail Development Local Gov., complementing Superfund PCEDC,MT TA, , C activities 2008-2010 FWP N/A $150,000 HRC&D Old Roundhouse- Local Gov., TA B Brownfield Project 2008-2009 EPA,DEQ N/A $485,000 , Historic Preservation Additional Listing of PCEDC, Building on the National Local Gov., , A Register of Historic Places 2008-2012 CDBG N/A TA Urban Renewal(Deer Local Gov., A Lodge) ext. TIFD 2008-2012 HRDC 5 TA Plan for Deer Lodge Sewer Local Gov., A/D Upgrades 2008-2010 CDBG 1 $30,000 Hydro-Electric Projects Local Groups, C (low impact) 2008-2009 HRC&D TA , PCEDC, Bio-Mass Development- HRC&D C FFS 2008-2010 School District 5-50 $600,000 Local Gov., A Courthouse Retrofit 2010 State, Federal Funding rAirport Improvements/Land Local Gov., , A Acquisition 2011 PCEDC,FAA 5-50 1 Funding Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. 2007Area Plan Page 106 ' ' Table 30—Headwaters RC&D/EDD Implementation Plan Authorized Element: A) Community Development: B) Land Conservation: C) Land Management D) Water Quality Quantity: Monetary Resources ' #of Technical Proposed Potential Assistance Goal Project/Pro ram Implementation Assistance Jobs T.A. Local Gov., North Side Water and PCEDC, A/D Sewer Improvements 2010-2012 CDBG TA,Funding Plan Water Improvement (city-wide) 2008-2009 Local Gov., $30,000 D construction 2011 CDBG 8 $1,000,000 Wastewater Treatment Local Gov., A/D Upgrade 2010 CDBG 8 1,000,000 Ladder Truck for Fire Local Gov., A Department 2010 DES N/A 100,000 WRC, East Side Stewardship HRC&D B Project 2008-2009 Numerous 2 $500,000 ' Local Gov., Private, TA A Implement Housing Plan 2008-2011 HRC&D 15 Unknown ' Local Gov., Private TA A Assisted Living Center 2011-2012 HRC&D 8 400,000 ' A Hospital Trauma Center 2010 Local Gov. 6 Unknown Rialto Board, A Rialto Theatre Renovation On-going HRC&D 2 $1,000,000 PCEDC, TA ' A Web Site Development 2008-2010 Private 1 $2,500 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. t2007 Area Plan Page 107 PPENDIX I 1 1 1 1 Headwaters RC&D Area,Inc. Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy,2007 RESOLUTION NO. , A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE ' CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&Dy ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS,Momana Governor's Office of Economic Devclopmem,is an active ' member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge,Beaverhead,Butte- ' Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison mid Powell which work togcthtt for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has adopted and upproved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area; and NOW THEREFORE,be it resolved that Montana Governor's Office of Economic , Development formally acknowledges their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&.D/Ecommic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. ' Zis"sl day of May,2001 O amela Hanby-Cott Senior Economic Deve opment Specialist , Governor's Office of Economic Development JUN-13-?007(WEE) 11:40 CE0ICONN15516N (FOX)406.563.4001 P.001/001 RESOLUTION NO.07.35 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVA71ON A110 DEVELOPMENT(RC&D ECONOMIC DEDEVELOPMENT DISTRICT) Wla:reas,Anawada-Deer Lodgc County is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District,and; ' Whereas,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including A acct nda-Deer Lodge,Beaverhead, Butte-Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the arcs and; ' Whereas,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive Ewromic Development Strategy for the seven county area Now,therefore,be it resolved that Anaconda-Deer Lodge County formally acknowledges its continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Eoowmic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. ' Dated this 12'h day oflune7,(J2�0"0�'7../''`' Linda Sather,Chairwainan Anaconda-Doer Lodge County Commission ' Attest: Carol Gululy Or Deputy Clerk of the Commission i 06/11/2007 16:54 14066433769 BEAVERIFAD_COLNTV PACE 01 i RESOLUTION NO.2007-09 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION ' AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)! ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS,Beaverhead County is an active member of the Headwaters i RC&D/Economic Development District; and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&DlEconomic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge,Beaverhead, i Butte-Silver How,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has adopted i and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area;and NOW THEREFORE,be it resolved that Beaverhead County Commissioners formally ackrwwledges their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&DlEconomic Development District and the seven county areas Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Adopted this 291°day of May 2007. , Beaverhead County Commissioners Garth L.Haugl�d Chairman Wi•1 Michael J. coley , Commissionne�/rs�9��,,,_ G'`//4 C.Thomas Rica Commissioners Attest: i Debra L. Scott , Beaverhead County Clerk and Recorder i 1 1 [16:18/2007 10:47 4066036361 MY OF DILLON PAQr 02/02 ' CITY OF DILLON.MONTANA 125N IDAHO - F 606-083-0245 ' DILLON,MT 59725 FAX AI➢0-tieb836T JCNR S(JS)TURNER FAn:X U DRECFOR OF OREAATgNa , CLE T P co" S w.G G URNT,R TREASURER tAN ATrplREY vROaann CdO10N W RIINP..IMLCSICH 1 June I&2007 Lisa Wheeler Headwaters RC&D,'5conomie Development District 305 W.Mercury St. Dillon.M7 59725 Dust Me Whecler. The City of Dillon,being an active member of the Hcadwaters RC&DfFconomic Development District which comprises scvm counties and thcir mumcipalitics,acknowledges their continued neod For regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D.•'Ecnnomic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Sincerely, Martin R.Malesich Mayor ' MRM:mc 1 TOWN OF LIMA RESOLUTION NO.2007-4 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)/ ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS, the Town of Lima is an active member of the Headwaters ' RC&D/Economic Development District,and WHEREAS, the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises , seven counties and their municipalities, including Anaconda-Deer Lodge, Beaverhead. Butte-Silver Bow, Granite, Jefferson, Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area,and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area, and NOW THEREFORE, be it resolved that the Town of Lima formally acknowledges ' their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. THIS RESOLUTION ADOPTED by an affirmative vote of the Town Council of the Town of Lima, Montana this 21st day of May, 2007 as a resolution which shall become effective and final ten days after filing with the clerk. or rk ' Cs-.Z/- 24-10-7 _ S .1-2007 Dale Date 06/12/2007 68:47 14064976224 CHIEF EXECUTIVES OFC PAGE 01 COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 07-37 1 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND ' 2 DEVELOPMENT (RC&D)./ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT COMPREHENSIVE 3 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE ' 4 HEREIN. g WHEREAS, the City and County of Butte Silver Bow, Montana ' 6 (Butte-Silver Bow) is an active member of the 7 Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District B (District); and g 4HEREAS, the District comprises seven counties and their 10 I municipalities, Including Anaconda-Deer Lodge, 11 I Beaverhead, Butte-Silver Bow, Granite, Jefferson, 12 Madison and Powell which work together for the common 13 good of the area; and 14 4HEREAS, the District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive 15 Economic Development Strategy (Strategy) for the seven 16 county area; and 17 HEREAS, it appearing to be in the best interests of the 1s Citizens of Butte-Silver Bow to support the Strategy 19 and continue our participation in the District. 20 OW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE COUNCIL OF COMMISSIONERS OF 21 HE CITY AND COUNTY OF BUTTE-SILVER BOW, STATE OF MONTANA AS ' FOLLOWS: 23 ECTION 1: That the City and County of Butte-Silver Bow 24 hereby formally acknowledge the continued need 25 ' i i 06/12/2007 08:47 14064976224 CHIEF DECUTIVES CFC PAGE 02 i 1 for regional economic development and planning 2 through the District and the seven county area i 3 Strategy and pledges its support of the Strategy 4 and continued participation in the District. S SECTION 2: That this Resolution shall be in full force and i 6 effect from and after passage and approval. 7 PASSED this 4W— day of , 2007. i 8 9 Y 110 CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL OF COMMI,SSSIIONERS 11 APPROVED this y of FL...r , 2007. 12 r f i 13 V J 14 CHIEF EXECUTIVE i 15 TTEST: 16 RY H. RO LERR AND D RECORDER 37 �,L�_SVLVicRB i mJ p O 18 � 19 sz-n 20 OF i 21 PPROVED AS TO FORM: 22 1 23 ROBERT c ART OUNTY ATTO Y 25 i 2 i 1 i i ' RESOLUTION NO.2007-7 00^ ' A GRANITE COUNTY RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&DJ/ ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS, Granite County is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Eeonomic Development District;and, WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities, including Anaconda-Deer Lodge, Beaverhead, Butte-Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell, which work together for the common good of the area;and, WHEREAS, the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy fm the seven ' county area. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that Granite County formally acknowledges its continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&DIEconomie Development District and the seven county Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. UNANIMOUSLY ADOPTED AND PASSED this 46 day of June,2007 A.D. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF GRANITE COUNTY H � Cliff Nelson,Chairman SuzaangBrowuing,Commimicnac Maureen Connor,Commissioner ATCEST:,[�i'IC.Yt4r/ )-0(1u'�-- B anche McI=.Clerk f 1 1 Resolution # 199 A RESOUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE f CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D) ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT , WHEREAS, (9taM , Ll[m/IAAA L is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Eco c Development District;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Ecoaomic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge,Beaverhead,Butte-Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has , adopted and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area;and NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED; be it resolved the 0..��, � <w formally acknowledges their continued need for regional economic�1 f development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. 1 1 �� � Ado ted this�day of (�� U 2007. ' Mayor Gail Leeper JA ice Clut Clerk/Treasurer 1 Council Members: 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 01 23'07 90N 16:34 FU 406 ssg 5015 Anne Flllaore, CPA ®onl RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)/ ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS, the Town of Philipsburg.Montana is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District;and ' WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Ecotwmic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge,Beaverhead,Butte- Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area and NOW THEREFORE,be it resolved that the Town of Philipsburg,Montana formally acknowledges their contiuned need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&Dffiwnom a Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Adopted this 15th oof/June,/2007. Atmc E.Fillmore,Mayor Jun 01 07 10:31a aef F.Co. Comm ss,aners 1 406 225 4148 P-1 RESOLUTION 13-2007 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION ' AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)IECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS,le[fersott County is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic ' Development District;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Eeonomie Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge,Beaverbead,Butte-Silva Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&DfEconomic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strawly for the seven-county area; NOW,THEREFORE,BE IT RESOLVED that Jefferson County formally , acUowledges their continued need for regional ecotwmic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive 1 Economic Development Strategy. DATED this 22°day of May,2007. ATTEST: BONNIE RAMEY KEN WEBER,CHAIR 1 CLERK AND RECORDER TOMAS E.LYTHGOE, SSIONER 1 CHUCK NO COMMISSIONER 1 1 1 i i 1 Jun 12 07 09:036 CITY OF BOULDER 1-406-225-94S0 p-2 RESOLUTION#2007-22 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&Dy ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS,City of Boulder is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District;and ' WHEREAS,the Hcadwza:rs RC&DIFconomic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge,Bcoverhead,Butte- Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area: and NOW THEREFORE,be it resolved that City of Boulder formally acknowledges their 1 continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&DJEconomic Development District and the seven county areas Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Adopted this I I"day of June,2007. ATTEST: City Clerk Mayor ..R. 12. i7'7 c.55pg I:. C634 F. 2 RESOLUTION NO. 04-07 ' A RP.SOLUTiON SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE ' CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)/ ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS, The Town of Whitehall is an active member of the Headwaters ' RC&DYEcomomic Development District;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&DlEconomic Development District comprises seven ' counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Dar Lodge,Beaverhead,Butte- Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive F:conomvc Development Strategy for the seven county area; and NOW THEREFORE,be it resolved that The Town of Whitehall formally ' acknowledges their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Adopted this LLB day of J. '-2007. Clerk,rycy PetremuM I rRESOLUTION 13-2007 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)l ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS,Madison County is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge, Beaverhead, Butte-Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson. Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District has adopted �! and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area;and NOW THEREFORE, be it resolved that Madison County formally acknowledges 1 their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS THIS 29"DAY OF MAY, 2007. DAVID SCHULZ. CHAIRMAN i LEWIS STAHL ll"Ie J ES P.HART ATTEST: Peggy Kaatz Clerk and Recorder i 1 � 1 L1 � 1 1 RESOLUTION NO.2007-3 ' A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)! ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WHEREAS,the Town of Twin Bridges is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer lodge,Beaverhead,Butte- Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&WEconomic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area; and NOW THEREFORE,be it resolved that the Town of Twin Bridges formally acknowledges their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District and the seven county areas Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Adopted this 8th day of May,2007. ATTEST: ' Thomas O.Hyndm ,Mayor Matt Gtcil resident 1 II i RESOLUTION NO.2007-5 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)/ ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRIC"I' WHEREAS,Town of Sheridan is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge,Beaverhead,Butte- ' Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&DlEeonomic Development District has adopted and approval a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven comity area; and I NOW THEREFORE,be it resolved that the Town of Sheridan formally acknowledges their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D1Economic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Adopted this 12th day of June 2007 Signed/ � I Title_ n[Rti/Gr Date Attest I I 06/14/2007 20:44 4068435327 T11.41 CF PAGE 01/01 Resolution 297 Town of Virginia City A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AN'D DEVELOPMENT(RC&D)f ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT N47HEREAS,the Town of V ireinia Ciry is an active member of the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District;and KTiEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge,Beaverhead,Butte. Sliver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the common good of the area;and ' WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Ecorkomic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area; and NOW THEREFORE,belt resolved that the Town of Virginia Citv formally acknowledges their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Developmeut District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Adopted this 10 _day of Lune .2007. J- ( ' �A� d—o dA � �(oLinda Hamilton,Mayor Attest: ClerklTreasurer 1 RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE HEADWATERS RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT(RC&DN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT ' WHEREAS,Powell County.Montana,is an active member of the Headwaters RC.&D/Economic Development District;and WHEREAS,the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District comprises seven counties and their municipalities,including Anaconda-Deer Lodge, Beaverhead,Butte- Silver Bow,Granite,Jefferson,Madison and Powell which work together for the 1 common good of the area:and WHEREAS,the I leadwaters RC&DlEconomic Development District has adopted and approved a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the seven county area; ami NOW THEREFORE,be it resolved that Powell County formally acknowledges their continued need for regional economic development and planning through the Headwaters RC&D/Economic Development District and the seven county area Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. Adopted this 16th day of May,2007. PO 'Ol1NT A F COMMISSIONERS armix,Chair Dwi t O'Hara Member Ga lone- ember ATIEST: 62D Diane S.Ci/y� Clerk and Recorder t