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2016 CDBG (IN GREY SCALE) OFFICE OF TfM GOVERNOR STATE OF MONTANA Steve Bullock , GOVERNOR Mike Cooney LT GOVERNOR Fes VED February 9, 2016 @RFF/�S 16?06 cpMM,s�Nry Leonard Wortman, Chair Jefferson County Commission PO Box H Boulder, MT 59632 RE: Notice of Community Development Block Grant Program Grant Award Dear Chairman Wortman, On behalf of the State of Montana, it is my pleasure to notify you that Jefferson County has been selected for a Community Development Block Grant Planning grant award in the amount of$15,000 to prepare a Preliminary Architectural Report for Building #6 of the South Campus in Boulder. All planning grant awardees will be contacted directly with more information in the coming weeks by program staff. If you have any questions, please call Ms. Kelly A. Lynch, Division Administrator of the Community Development Division at the Montana Department of Commerce, at 406-841-2770 or by email at DOCCDBG(a�mt �� Again, congratulations and good luck on the successful completion of your project. Sincerely, STEVE BULLOCK Governor STATE CAPITOL • P.O. BOY 200801 • HELENA MONTANA 59620.0801 TELEPHONE: 406-444-3111 • FAX: 406-444-5529 • WEBSITE: WWW.MT.GOV MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Community Development Division MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM (CDBG) September 2015 Submitted by: Jefferson County, Montana on behalf of Jefferson Local Development Corporation APPLICATION FOR HOUSING, PUBLIC FACILITIES & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLANNING GRANT Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson local Development.Corporation September 2015 CDBG PLANNING GRANT APPLICATION FORM MONTANA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION ACCEPTANCE OF CDBG PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS The Applicant hereby certifies that: It will comply with all applicable parts of Title I of the Federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974,as amended,which have not been cited herein,as well as with other applicable federal laws and regulations. It will comply with all requirements established by the Montana Department of Commerce and applicable State laws,regulations,and administrative procedures. It accepts the terms, conditions, selection criteria, and procedures established by the Montana Community Development Block Grant(CDBG)Program and expressly waives any statutory or common law right it may have to challenge the legitimacy and propriety of these terms, conditions, criteria, and procedures in the event that it is not selected for an award of CDBG funds. APPLICANT-CERTIFICATION To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information provided in this application and in the attached documents is true and correct. 2 Signature: Ae.ZC`� Chief Elected Official or Authorized Representative Name Bob Mullen Title Chairman Date 5eotember 24 2015 Applicant's information Name of Local Government Jefferson County,Montana Phone#: 406-225 4025 Fax#: 406-225-4148 Mailing Address of Applicant: PO Box H;Boulder, MT 59632 Federal Tax ID#: BI-6001377 DUNS Number: 01245869410000 North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) Code Name: Bob Mullen Affiliation, Jefferson County Job Title: Commission Chairman Phone#: 406-225-4025 Fax#: 406-225-4148 E-mail Address: bmullen @jeffersoncounty-mt.gov pate 1 M 16 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 Mailing Address of Applicant PO Box H: Boulder, MT 59632 Other Contacts for JLDC: Tom Harrington,JLDC Manager harrington @montana.edu—406-287-3282 Tara Mastel taramastel @gmail.com—406-490-4180 1W 0 CDBG Planning.Grant Funds Requested: 1$ 0.000 , .r. OTHER FUNDING SOURCES: AMOUNT STATUS OF COMMITMENT (Pending or Firm) Local Match—Jefferson Local Development $5,000 Firm—Committed Corporation CDBG Planning Grant Funds $10,000 Pending TOTAL ESTIMATED PROJECT COST $15,000 PROVIDE A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED PLANNING ACTIVITY& COMMUNITY/PRIVATE ENTITY BENEFIT BELOW: Jefferson County is submitting a planning grant application on behalf of Jefferson Local Development Corporation (JLDC) for funding to hire a professional architect firm to prepare a Preliminary Architectural Report (PAR) associated with Building #6 of the South Campus located in Boulder, Montana. Jefferson County owns the South Campus buildings in Boulder and leases the facilities to JLDC. The South Campus is listed on the United States Department of Interior National Registry of Historic Places and is described as "The Montana Training School Historic District encompasses nearly 31 acres of the Boulder Valley at the south edge of Boulder, Montana. The location provides a commanding view of the nearby mountains including the Elkhorn Mountains to the northeast, Ryan Mountains to the southwest, and the Boulder Hills to the north. The Continental Divide lies just over 20 miles to the west. The district includes the historic South Campus of the training school, and lies along the south side of the Boulder River. Additional training school facilities located on the north side of the river are no longer extant or do not retain sufficient integrity to contribute to the historic district."An April 2oog article from The Boulder Monitor is included as Attachment A and describes the vision of the campus in coordination with historic preservation experts. Preparation of a PAR for housing or public facilities projects (other than drinking water, wastewater, storm water or solid waste facilities), or that supports an economic development project identified as a priority by the local government, meets eligibility requirements set forth in the 2015-2016 application guidelines for CDBG housing, public facilities and economic development planning grants. The development of the PAR will be consistent with the Department of Commerce requirements for PARs. The development of the PAR will also utilize two prior planning documents — the Jefferson County Building #6 - Building Condition Report (prepared by SMA Architects in July 2014) and the Building No. 6 - Boulder Development Center — Building Assessment and Reuse Plan (prepared by CTA Architects in 201o). These documents are included as Attachment B. Page 2 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2o15 Youth Dynamics currently leases two buildings on the South Campus in Boulder, Montana, which JLDC manages.The organization is committed to providing comprehensive and progressive behavioral health services to meet the ever-changing needs of youth and families. Youth Dynamics provides a wide continuum of care for youth, including many options for treatment, ranging from mentoring to intensive level therapeutic group homes. A child may receive all services from Youth Dynamics, or may be served by several agencies. Youth Dynamics wishes to expand their operation to include treatment for youth with substance abuse issues. These services are of great need and currently not available in the State of Montana. Youth Dynamics would like to remodel the larger Building #6 to include treatment areas and dorm rooms.They would move their operation from the South Campus Building #8 which is 8,00o square feet into Building #6, which is 24,000 square feet. They would then be able to serve more youth and provide an additional 25 full-time employment positions. Nearly all of the clients Youth Dynamics serves are low-income youth and wages paid to employees are typically between $10-15/hr. The fact that the project is located in Boulder is significant because the legislature recently voted to close that town's largest employer, the Montana Developmental Center. This project also has the potential to satisfy JLDC goals of creating jobs as well as fulfilling civic responsibilities of eliminating blight. The PAR will provide a clear analysis of existing conditions in Building #6, a thorough and reasonable proposal to address the deficiencies, a reasonable cost estimate and an alternatives analysis to the renovation and repurposing of the existing building. I. ELIGIBLE APPLICANT? [See Application Guidelines, page 4.] o Yes ❑ No 11. APPLICATION SUBMITTED ON BEHALF OF A NON-PROFIT AGENCY,WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT OR SIMILAR ORGANIZATION? [If`yes,describe the agency/organization.] © Yes ❑ No Please describe the agency on behalf of which the local government is applying, Jefferson County is submitting this application on behalf of Jefferson Local Development Corporation (JLDC). JLDC provides information, finance solutions and educational programs for business and community members in Jefferson County Montana. JLDC supports business creation,expansion,retention and relocation by leveraging business and government resources. 111. ELIGIBLE PLANNING ACTIVITY? [See Application Guidelines, pages 4-5.] o Yes ❑ No IV. ARE REQUIRED MATCHING FUNDS PROVIDED? [See Guidelines, pages 6-7.] © Yes Page 3 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 • No • Waiver of match requested with supporting documentation V. REQUIRED LETTER(S) OF COMMITMENT INCLUDED? [For funds or resources to be provided by a non-profit agency, water and sewer district, or similar organization;see Application Guidelines, pages 6-7.] ❑ Yes ❑ No lg NA VI. IS A PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE PROVIDED? [Provide a project implementation schedule using Exhibit I attached. Include a brief narrative to explain your proposed project schedule.] ® Yes ❑ No The Project Implementation schedule with brief narratives explaining the proposed project schedule and utilizing Exhibit I, is detailed below. PAR DEVELOPMENT FOR BUILDING#6 IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE TASK MONTH/YEAR f� COMMITTEE MEETINGS,AND FUNDING PROCURE14EivT Funding procurement-submit applications to CDBG. October 2015 Preparation of MDOC contract. November 2015 ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Submit RFP to MDOC for approval. December 2015 Publish RFP and conduct limited solicitation. January 2o16 Select professional services firm. February 2o16 Execute agreement with professional services firm. Fcbruary 2o16 MA4611 IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES/MILESTONES Contracted architectural firm prepares draft PAR. Mid-Fehruary 2016 11ay 2016 Thirty day public comment period of draft PAR and review by JLDC staff May 2016 members. Submit draft report and request first drawdown of funds to MDOC. June 2o16 Incorporation of edits and public comments to draft PAR. June 2016 Finalization of PAR. July 2016 gi- Submit final report and request final drawdown of funds. July 2016 VII. IS THE PROPOSED PROJECT BUDGET AND BUDGET JUSTIFICATION NARRATIVE PROVIDED? [Use Exhibit 2 attached to list your project budget and to provide a detailed narrative that explains and justifies each line item of your proposed budget] © Yes Page 4.f 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 ❑ No Exhibit 2 was used to prepare the project budget and detailed narrative which explains and justifies each line item of the proposed budget. Detailed budget information is included below. BUDGET for:JLDC Building #6 PAR Date: Sept. 29, 2015 SOURCE: SOURCE: SOURCE: TOTAL CDBG JLDC Planning Activities Professional Services $10,000.00 $5,000.00 $15,000.00 Other (Describe) TOTAL PLANNING PROJECT $10,000.00 $5,000.00 $15,000.00 APPLICANT'S RESPONSE- Budget justification Narrative: Recent communication with Helena area and Jefferson County architectural firms included a request for an estimate on the cost of preparation of a PAR that follows Montana Department of Commerce (MDOC)CDBG PAR guidelines.The request was to take into consideration the use of the Building Condition Report for Building #6 that was prepared for Jefferson County in July 2014 by SMA and the Building No. 6 - Boulder Development Center — Building Assessment and Reuse Plan (prepared by CTA Architects in 201o). Firms were reminded that State of Montana and MDOC requirements concerning procurement of professional services will apply once funding was secured — "to be eligible for reimbursement, professional architectural services must be procured in compliance with Section 18-8-201, MCA. CDBG recommends using the formal RFP process to increase the community's ability to hire the best qualified consultant." JLDC will be using these guidelines once grant funding is secured. Two estimates to prepare the PAR were received (of six requested) and the average of the cost estimates was $15,000. The total estimated project budget - $15,000 — will be allocated to the cost of professional services specific to the development of a PAR.Jefferson County will compensate an architectural firm to prepare the report. The firm will be experienced in preparing PARS and will follow CDBG PAR requirements. Should CDBG funds be awarded for this project,the County will facilitate the procurement of a professional architect licensed to practice in the State of Montana. As per CDBG planning grant guidelines, JLDC is providing a $5,000 match; the letter of commitment is included as Attachment C. VIII. DETAILED PROJECT PROPOSAL Page 5 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 Using separate sheets, applicants must thoroughly address each of the questions below, providing detailed responses. If a particular question is not applicable to the proposed planning project, the applicant must address why it is not applicable; simply answering `n(a will result in the application being considered incomplete. Visual aids and supplemental documents are encouraged to help illustrate the planning activity funding is being requested for. A. Describe how the proposed planning project will: I. Supports existing Montana communities by: a. Targeting funding toward existing communities to increase community revitalization, improve the efficiency of public works investments,and safeguards rural landscapes; b. Encouraging appropriate and comprehensive planning, market studies, preliminary architecture reports,and other studies or plans that support the sustainability of local communities,affordable housing, public works investments,vital employment centers,and the environment; c. Enhance the unique and resilient characteristics of all communities by investing in healthy, safe and walkable neighborhoods—rural, urban and suburban; d. Encouraging the rehabilitation of existing rental and owner-occupied homes, particularly for those with special needs and the elderly; and e. Encouraging the development and rehabilitation of community facilities and services located within walkable neighborhoods and/or served by public transportation systems,particularly for those with special needs and the elderly. 2. Supports investment in vital public infrastructure by: a. Encouraging appropriate and comprehensive pre-development planning activities for public infrastructure, including asset management,needs analysis,preliminary engineering and/or architectural reports, and other studies or plans; b. Providing funding opportunities to improve safety and efficiency of public infrastructure, promote health, safe and walkable neighborhoods, and safeguard the environment;and c. Provide funding opportunities to serve eligible Montanans, [particularly those special needs and elderly populations,with safe, efficient public infrastructure. 3. Enhances Montana's economic competitiveness by: a. Providing reliable and timely access to employment centers, educational opportunities,services and other basic needs by works as well as expanded business markets; b. Supporting comprehensive planning for downtown revitalization, business development, and other studies or plans to attract and retain talent in Montana communities; Page 6 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 c. Providing job opportunities to eligible Montanans to strengthen communities within the State; d. Encouraging activities that support and strengthen new and existing businesses, particularly those located within traditional downtown business centers comprising a mix of business, housing and services; e. Encouraging housing and mixed-use development that contributes to broader revitalization efforts in Montana communities; and f. Seeking opportunities to achieve multiple economic development goals, such as removing barriers to collaboration, leveraging multiple funding sources,and increasing efficiency through a single investment. 4. Promoting equitable, affordable housing in Montana by: a. Expanding location and energy efficient housing choices for people of all ages, incomes, races and ethnicities to increase mobility and lower the combined cost of housing and transportation; b. Encouraging activities to acquire and/or construct new affordable housing for homeownership or rental in areas where existing investment in infrastructure, facilities and services leverages multiple economic,environmental and community objectives; c. Encouraging appropriate and comprehensive planning, market studies, preliminary architectural reports, and other studies or plans in support of the efficient construction of affordable housing; and d. Encouraging financial mechanism that increase homeownership opportunities and provide rental assistance to eligible Montanans, particularly those with special needs and the elderly. B. Address the following elements as they relate to the proposed planning project, providing references and supplemental documentation as necessary to adequately illustrate a response: I. The need for financial assistance to complete the planning project; 2. The fiscal capacity of the applicant to meet the grant conditions required by the Department, including but not limited to its ability to manage the planning project and demonstrate the use of generally accepted accounting principles; 3. Past efforts to ensure sound, effective, long-term community wide planning; 4. The ability to obtain and commit the required matching funds; Page 7 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 5. The demonstrated importance of, and the community's current support for,the planning project. 6. Relation of planning project to business expansion or retention, specifically the number of potential jobs created or retained as a result of the proposed planning effort. C. Describe the intended outcome of the proposed planning project; how will the receipt of planning grant funds have a positive impact on the applicant community, and what steps will be taken following the conclusion of the planning activity (additional grant funds sought, implementation, construction, etc.)? As per guidelines, please see separate sheets att-dwd itn at e_ this section. Page 8 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 VIII.DETAILED PROJECT PROPOSAL A. Describe how the proposed planning project will: 1)Support existing Montana communities by: a. Targeting funding toward existing communities to increase community revitalization, improve the efficiency of public works investments,and safeguards rural landscapes; The PAR process will assist the County and JLDC in increasing community revitalization while safeguarding the rural landscape of the Boulder community. Planning strategies and community improvements over time will promote better use of the County's limited resources,reduce costs and assist in the coordination of public and private development. All of JLDC's efforts are aimed at increasing community vitality.JLDC recently completed renovation of a 13,000 square foot building in downtown Whitehall for the express purpose of increasing the vitality of the downtown.The area felt a large economic downturn after a 2009 fire destroyed approximately 25% of the downtown area—including 5 buildings, 9 businesses and affecting nearly 3o employees. JLDC campaigned to have the former Montana Developmental Center campus turned over to Jefferson County for redevelopment in 2000. Once under guidance of Jefferson County, JLDC renovated two of the buildings for the purpose of serving youth development programs. Since the time the buildings were renovated, JLDC facilitated replacement of the City of Boulder water and sewer lines that serve the campus. Additionally,JLDC staff is involved in safeguarding rural landscapes with involvement in the significant Jefferson River Watershed project. This project aims to restore the original streambed of Pipestone Creek and eliminating the invasive Eurasion Milfoil plant from the Jefferson Slough area. JLDC staff member Tom Harrington serves on the advisory committee for these projects and has been involved with the project from the start. JLDC staff participates in the Chambers of Commerce in Boulder and Whitehall in an effort to increase community revitalization and staff also assists with the development and maintenance of the Vigilante Loop tourism trail that has as its purpose to enhance community revitalization. b. Encouraging appropriate and comprehensive planning, market studies, preliminary architecture reports, and other studies or plans that support the sustainability of local communities, affordable housing, public works investments,vital employment centers, and the environment; Jefferson County and JLDC has several comprehensive planning documents, engineering reports and other studies that will be beneficial to reference while preparing the PAR. Regional and statewide plans,policies and studies will also be utilized. Recent planning documents prepared about Building #6 will be used in the preparation of the Page 9 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 PAR, including the Building Condition Report for Building #6 (prepared for Jefferson County in July 2014) by SMA and the Building No. 6 - Boulder Development Center — Building Assessment and Reuse Plan (prepared by CTA Architects in 2olo). These documents are included as Attachment B. JLDC has a strong appreciation of appropriate and comprehensive planning. The organization submitted an application and was awarded a $5000 grant from DNRC to complete a plan in Whitehall. This project also received a $2,500 match commitment from the Town of Whitehall to support plan development. Additionally JLDC has: • submitted a successful grant application that assisted in completion of a Master Plan for the Sunlight Business Park that was developed in 2oo9; • administered a study of senior housing needs in the City of Boulder as part of the affordable housing project conducted there; • submitted a grant application for a PAR for Building #5 in the South Campus in preparation potential tenant occupation of the building; and, • in conjunction with MSU Extension, facilitated the 18-month leadership development, visioning and planning program in Whitehall, Boulder, Twin Bridges and Sheridan to assist the communities in developing a common vision for the future of the area,as well as a plan of action from 2oo6-2009. c. Enhance the unique and resilient characteristics of all communities by investing in healthy, safe and walkable neighborhoods —rural,urban and suburban; Jefferson County recently completed its Growth Policy in June 2003 and amended the policy in November 2oo9. The plan (available on the Jefferson County website under the Planning page at http://ieffersoncounty-mtaov/county[ lanninghtml) contains sections relative to creating and maintaining healthy and walkable neighborhoods in all areas of the county and including parks and trails creation and maintenance. Additionally, JLDC staff has participated in a walking trails committee that was created out of the Horizon's program and has brought in a speaker from the Gallatin Valley Land Trust to speak to interested parties in Whitehall regarding new trails in the area. d. Encouraging the rehabilitation of existing rental and owner-occupied homes, particularly for those with special needs and the elderly; and The process of preparing a PAR related to an existing building that has potential to be repurposed in the community of Boulder will also assist Jefferson County and JLDC in identifying its community development and housing needs, including the needs of low and moderate income persons and the activities to be undertaken to meet such needs. JLDC has facilitated the construction of six owner-occupied homes in Boulder and the purchase and development of an 11-acre parcel in Whitehall for owner-occupied homes. A four-plex unit in Whitehall-currently in planning stages -will be dedicated to people with special needs. Page 10 of 27 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 e. Encouraging the development and rehabilitation of community facilities and services located within walkable neighborhoods and/or served by public transportation systems, particularly for those with special needs and the elderly. JLDC staff has assisted with the development and rehabilitation of the Whitehall Community Center which is centrally located in the town of Whitehall. JLDC has also facilitated in the replacement of water and sewer lines in the South Campus area served by the City of Boulder. Seven stakeholders collaborated to replace the aged and inadequate infrastructure lines. The facilitation of the process by JLDC was a significant achievement as each entity was required to participate financially as part of the matching requirement for the public funding for the project. a)Supports investment in vital public infrastructure by: a. Encouraging appropriate and comprehensive pre-development planning activities for public infrastructure ,including asset management,needs analysis,preliminary engineering and/or architectural reports,and other studies or plans; Jefferson County and JLDC currently have policies in place to plan for public infrastructure projects through use of contracted engineering firms who assist with needs analyses and preliminary engineering and architectural reports. As per previous planning efforts, the PAR will encourage pre-development planning activities for the building and will utilize professionals that can most effectively assist in those activities. b. Providing funding opportunities to improve safety and efficiency of public infrastructure,promote health,safe and walkable neighborhoods, and safeguard the environment; and Jefferson County and JLDC actively research and pursue many funding opportunities for a multitude of projects and department program requests. These funding opportunities have assisted with public infrastructure, health and wellness, environment, capital improvements and many more projects and programs. The County and JLDC will continue to research and apply for funding opportunities that are beneficial to the successful design, implementation and sustainability of worthy public projects. c. Provide funding opportunities to serve eligible Montanans,tparticularly those special needs and elderly populations,with safe, efficient public infrastructure. The preparation of a PAR for Building #6 with a vision to repurpose an existing building to expand service areas within the community of Boulder will contribute to the promotion of equitable, affordable housing by helping to prioritize development through renovation of existing structures while reducing blight. In rural Jefferson County, a Page 11 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 sustainable and equitable approach may mean clustering development affordable to families of all incomes around town centers to ensure that trips to the workplace, retail services and other amenities do not require lengthy travel in a personal vehicle. 3) Enhances Montana's economic competitiveness by: a. Providing reliable and timely access to employment centers,educational opportunities, services and other basic needs by works as well as expanded business markets; JLDC endeavors to choose appropriate projects in order to provide reliable and timely access to employment center, educational opportunities, services and other basic needs. Creation of a PAR for an existing building that could be repurposed to meet the increasing and substantiated needs of youth in crisis in the State of Montana, while increase employment levels in the City of Boulder, enhances Montana's economic competitiveness as well as reduces current blight. b. Supporting comprehensive planning for downtown revitalization, business development, and other studies or plans to attract and retain talent in Montana communities; JLDC submitted an application and received a grant to develop an Urban Renewal District (URD) in the Town of Whitehall. As part of the process to develop the URD, an urban renewal plan was developed and adopted by the Town of Whitehall. JLDC works cooperatively with Headwaters RC&D to conduct periodic business planning workshops for burgeoning entrepreneurs in the area. JLDC also received a grant to compensate CTA Architects to complete a Master Plan for the Sunlight Business Park in Whitehall. Part of the Master Plan includes a marketing strategy on how to recruit businesses to fill the Park. c. Providing job opportunities to eligible Montanans to strengthen communities within the State; Jefferson County receives monthly updates from three partner economic and community development resources (Montana State University Extension — Economic Development Office, JLDC and Headwaters RC&D) in order to assess current job opportunities and potential for upcoming opportunities.Jefferson County also has a solid relationship with the Montana Job Service, who provides information to the public about all current openings at Jefferson County. JLDC estimates that in the past 17 years, the organization has assisted with the creation of 146 jobs in Jefferson County while retaining 233 employment positions. Page U of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 d. Encouraging activities that support and strengthen new and existing businesses,particularly those located within traditional downtown business centers comprising a mix of business, housing and services; Jefferson County works closely with JLDC, Headwaters RC&D, the Small Business Development Centers and the Montana Department of Commerce on strategies for supporting and reinforcing existing businesses. The County also works with local chambers of commerce related to the historic downtown area in the county seat of Boulder and the Town of Whitehall. JLDC recently renovated the Borden's building in Whitehall.This mixed-use development has residential occupants on the second floor and commercial lessees on the main floor. Six months after renovation,the building is l00% occupied. Of the eight commercial spaces in the building, five are new businesses that existed as home-based businesses prior to the renovation project. In addition, five of the businesses in the building,have hired employees,or are in the planning process to hire new employees. A major benefit as a result of the Borden building renovation project is that the neighboring building was purchased and is undergoing a renovation. The economic benefits of the Borden building project could potentially be duplicated in this additional building. The owner indicated that the building was purchased and is being renovated as a direct result of the JLDC investment in the Borden building project. e. Encouraging housing and mixed-use development that contributes to broader revitalization efforts in Montana communities; and Jefferson County and JLDC will endeavor to incorporate housing and mixed-use development policies that contribute to revitalization efforts within the County. As discussed in the previous section, the Borden building renovation project was undertaken with the vision of assisting with the revitalization of Whitehall. JLDC invested in a previous PAR of South Campus Building #5 that included a plan for mixed- use development. Although the anchor business for this project found a more suitable location, JLDC still encourages and hopes to assist with mixed-use development in Jefferson County. f. Seeking opportunities to achieve multiple economic development goals, such as removing barriers to collaboration, leveraging multiple funding sources, and increasing efficiency through a single investment. Jefferson County's vision is "A land of promise for economic development purposes." Jefferson County abounds with natural resources and its economy is based around these, including production agriculture, wood products and mining. The mining industry is centered around two large mines at either end of the County. One large operation, about 1.5 miles off Interstate Highway 90 at State Highway 69, near Whitehall, is the Golden Sunlight Mine. It is an open pit operation that has over 170 employees and has an annual Page 13 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 payroll of about 13 million dollars. The Mine recently announced plans to lay off 140 of those workers in November due to falling gold prices. Montana Tunnels Mining Inc., a subsidiary of Elkhorn Goldfields Corporation, is located approximately seven miles from the town of Jefferson City. Montana Tunnels is an open pit mine that produces zinc, lead, silver and gold. At their peak, they employed over 200 people and had an annual payroll over 13 million dollars. The business closed in 2009. Another natural resource related business is Ash Grove Cement located near Montana City.Ash Grove,with an 83 person workforce, uses limestone, which is mined locally at a quarry, to produce bulk cement. Finally, Jefferson County has a burgeoning youth and social services industry. Alternative Youth Adventures(AYA),operated by Youth Dynamics on the South Campus in Boulder, provides a range of services for troubled youth. AYA employs about 30 people. Riverside Corrections, a state-run detention center for juvenile females, employs about 30 people.The new Women's Elkhorn Meth Treatment Center employs 30 people. The Montana Developmental Center is a State managed facility for adults with developmental disabilities, employing 250 people; however, recent State Legislature sessions have determined that the center will be closed within two years. Liberty Place Incorporated has two facilities in Whitehall and employs 20 people providing care and services for individuals with traumatic brain injury. 4)Promoting equitable,affordable housing in Montana by: a. Expanding location and energy efficient housing choices for people of all ages,incomes, races and ethnicities to increase mobility and lower the combined cost of housing and transportation; As mentioned previously,Jefferson County works with JLDC, Headwaters RC&D and the National Affordable Housing Network of Butte on ways to expand location and energy efficient housing choices for community members, regardless of race, income, age, ethnicity or disability. PAR development activities will utilize this relationship and will encourage energy efficient designs for Building #6. The Borden building operating costs needed to be feasible in order to work within the small town economics of Whitehall.A large component of the Borden's building renovation was to incorporate energy saving technologies so that the operating costs of the building could be reduced. An array of solar panels was installed on the roof of Borden's which substantially reduce the electric costs of the building. Additionally, the affordable housing project JLDC facilitated with National Affordable Housing Network in Boulder and Whitehall was/is focused on energy-efficient home design. b. Encouraging activities to acquire and/or construct new affordable housing for homeownership or rental in areas where existing investment in infrastructure, facilities and services leverages multiple economic, environmental and community objectives; Page 14 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 Jefferson County and JLDC works to support a variety of programs that serve to facilitate the production of affordable housing, most recently with the National Affordable Housing Network (NAHN) in Boulder and Whitehall. NAHN is a nonprofit housing developer located in Butte. JLDC and Jefferson County partnered with NAHN to construct six occupant-owned homes in Butte and is nearly finished with a four-home build on land they have purchased in Whitehall. A subsequent build is planned on the property NAHN owns in Whitehall for additional owner-occupied homes. All of NAHN's home designs are highly energy efficient. The homes in Whitehall are planned with solar panels. c. Encouraging appropriate and comprehensive planning,market studies, preliminary architectural reports,and other studies or plans in support of the efficient construction of affordable housing; and Though the project is not specific to an affordable housing project, as discussed in Section VIII-A-1, Jefferson County has several comprehensive planning documents, engineering reports and other studies that will be beneficial to reference regarding the development of the PAR. Regional and statewide plans, policies and studies can also be utilized.The creation of the PAR will include consultation with local and regional experts and/or use of relative report information. The PAR that JLDC self-funded included affordable housing on the second floor aimed to service direct care employees with Youth Dynamic's AYA program. The construction of that housing was dependent on the commercial tenant on the first floor which did not materialize and the project was postponed. d. Encouraging financial mechanism that increase homeownership opportunities and provide rental assistance to eligible Montanans, particularly those with special needs and the elderly. Jefferson County and JLDC work to support a variety of programs that serve to facilitate the production of affordable housing. National Affordable Housing purchased 11 acres adjacent to the Town of Whitehall for a 48 unit owner-occupied affordable housing development. The project is made possible through a USDA Rural Development Mutual Self-Help grant where home owners contribute "sweat equity" to offset the cost of their home. The first four homes are nearing completion this fall and a second build should begin soon after the first homes are complete. National Affordable Housing Network is leading the project and JLDC is assisting with the project through promotion and local contacts. A four-plex in the development will be devoted to people with special needs in partnership with Whitehall-based Liberty Place. B.Address the following elements as they relate to the proposed planning project, providing references and supplemental documentation as necessary to adequately illustrate a response: i)The need for financial assistance to complete the planning project; Page 15 d 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 JLDC has committed resources to assist with completing a PAR. In order to fully compensate a licensed professional architect for preparation of the Building #6 PAR, Jefferson County, on behalf of JLDC, is requesting financial assistance to complete the project. 2)The fiscal capacity of the applicant to meet the grant conditions required by the Department, including but not limited to its ability to manage the planning project, demonstrate the use of generally accepted accounting principles; JLDC has the fiscal and managerial capacity to meet the grant conditions required by the Department. JLDC is experienced in performing grant and project administration activities, including but not limited to: facilitating free and open competitions to procure consultants, coordinating sources of funding, establishing and maintaining complete and accurate project files, processing payment requests and preparing drawdown requests and completing project progress and closeout reports. JLDC manages the County's two Tax Increment Finance Industrial Districts for them and generally serves as loaned staff to Jefferson County on this and other similar projects. The County is in compliance with the auditing and annual financial reporting requirements provided for in the Montana Single Audit Act, 2-7-501 to 522, MCA. Finally, the County utilizes the Budgetary Accounting and Reporting System (BARS) Chart of Accounts and Black Mountain software. 3)Past efforts to ensure sound, effective,long-term community wide planning; Jefferson County has successfully implemented efforts to ensure sound, effective and long-term community wide planning. In accordance with Section 76-1-6o1, MCA, the County prepared and adopted a Growth Policy in 2003, amended in 2009. The Policy addresses a long-term commitment to community planning in the County and includes sections on recent improvements, community goals and objectives, community infrastructure needs and infrastructure maintenance and replacement strategies. 4)The ability to obtain and commit the required matching funds; JLDC has committed to the required matching funds of $5,000. A letter of commitment, evidencing this commitment has been provided as Attachment C. g)The demonstrated importance of, and the community's current support for,the planning project; The preparation of the PAR update is important and supported in the community. Letters in support of the project have been provided by Jefferson County, the City of Boulder, Youth Dynamics and the Boulder Area Chamber of Commerce are included in Attachment D. 6)Relation of planning project to business expansion or retention, specifically the number of potential jobs created or retained as a result of the proposed planning effort. The renovation and increase in service areas provided by Youth Dynamics is estimated to provide an additional 25 jobs in Jefferson County. The potential for this project to eventually Page 16 of 17 Jefferson County on behalf of CDBG Planning Grant Jefferson Local Development Corporation September 2015 provide jobs and much needed youth services would also help the community with additional business expansion and/or retention with new employees and youth served requiring additional goods and services in the City of Boulder. C. Describe the intended outcome of the proposed planning project; how will the receipt of planning grant funds have a positive impact on the applicant community,and what steps will be taken following the conclusion of the planning activity(additional grant funds sought,implementation,construction, etc.)? The intended outcome or deliverable as a result of the planning project is PAR specific to Building #6 in the South Campus,which is owned by Jefferson County and leased and managed by JLDC. The preparation of the PAR will help to adequately describe existing building conditions and problems, present and analyze reasonable alternatives and propose a specific course of action to solve the identified problems. It will also adequately assess the need for, feasibility and general estimated cost of the proposed repurposing of Building #6. The receipt of planning grant funds will have a positive impact in the County by supporting the development of a PAR. The PAR will provide information and analysis that is crucial to some funding sources in terms of need, strategies and implementation and management. The PAR will also provide consistency in the community by providing detailed information to successive elected officials who change over time. Upon completion of the PAR, JLDC will begin to implement strategies identified and develop an appropriate and feasible funding strategy to move the proposed project forward. Page 17 of 17 50 cents KUL A ' THE BOULDER cz Jefferson County Courthento ors 1889 onPsrcirxN Volume CIl-No.29 teawe„son..mai•P,o.an.as•aaam.r.M-1-ashax Wednesday,April 1, 2009 , ° p rlf ' Wa & &Pd Wff k Boulder digs out Monday morning Baer an all-day blizzard an Sunday dumped piles of snow everywhere,closing Interstate 15 over the Boulder Hill and forcing roughly 80 travelers to seek temporary shelter as emergency crews spent sewn hours untangling the traffic mans.(Photos by Jan Anderson) Snow storm strands Boulder Hill travelers by Sally Buckles, ie cleared with Mariana Jefferson County DES highway department—.now 5 Thepapilafonaf Bould ellorlem plows. porarlly Sunday affa a massive blizcmd Msawhile,back I. ik1 it forced scoos of motorists into mmporm- Boulder,the Boulder grade fly shelter to wall out the storm.Inictitate soheal gym wds opened 15 north of Boulder was closed as enu:r- as a shelter for needed genet'crews spent seven hours clearing so m,,1, and, as usual the Boulder Hill. in Boulder,offers of help Howling wind,and snowddfls of up came from everywhere- A fringe of Icicles decorates a Boulder business to four foot made travel on the hill terms- Billie Rudolph adLiese rpofhne Monday morning. nlileaMskandcdduzomof vehicles. Pella'from the school staff f- The top of Bouldm Hill resembled a fo omal their wockmal and `p'1 ort game from the playground,but the candout of their homes to come to the as hems fa the struukd towders. untangling the mesa was not mcomponied cue.The school was opened In less than About 12:30 a.m.Mondry,the sheriff by very ,auy laugha ahahfbour from the wall for neo,mnce,and advi,cal Our those who wished could rav- Boulder Police Dclaloentaadfin Peeler brought th his cow,to make sm,the of over Boulder Hill to them destinations. crews from three ernh Jefferson County gym was welcoming and warm Blankets Several chose to remain until daylight. fire departments blocked roads white the were bswght from the ambulance loam, Withfess minarghtchmodwrhenthe Gator's Plus owner George Gadalre, sheriff and several depmies coned out rmf- the fail and Nll C,to add to Oars,that were w storm and inconvenience,ft coo- clears anew from the front of his shop fic.With the help of several wreckers ca- brougbr in by many of the Seventy-five to ra ni ng went well.No one was hurt and the Monday morning. pableal moving semi ri vehicles were eighty people who spear sc c,al Mua in ocammudy came mgerher to assist those cleared out so that[be four fart drifts could the sicll'Tress Lanni stopped in to act in need, Envisioning a future built on the past... Area residents meet with historic preservation experts by Jan Anderson editor r„;. ;r, Weather Statistics A commercial kdchc abusr ND j1S� . �4 Bate H L Preclp menter n a seteran center $CDO Meeting and a vocatk nal school were all Tues 18 19 ,00 snong proposals male by pu- _ Wed 41 L9 ,Olt keignias err a Saturday In.anosal TM1Urs 25 IO .00 preservmisar workshop looking $rudder M¢lhndist Fri d3 11 A0 into future uses far abandunea Fellowship Hall sat 46 M ,00 buildings on the Comer muth Sun 46 25 .42 ampus of she Mon.Develop- Moo 29 13 .04 menial Cents togs h i 1 I L- f pmmiu,t h s ... - - snow,o /k 8 nnAm Following a taut of the build wile p t and ren urn One of the buildings under discussion area on the former s+PPro+ err! 3 30 gnu ings n BOuldcr,an export frmn Sarah Hansen of the Archnc- Moe south campus outside of Boulder.The archways,front Sunday,March 29,9 inches Massachusmi told roughly 35 mml Heritage Foundarion called porch and abundance of windows were among the plusses Monday,March 30,10 inches pmdciparas that the vaeam huid- See PRESERVATION,p.3 oned by those who toured. BOULDER MONITOR Wednesday,April 1,2d,09.Page 3 Countyregains PRESERVATION: ideas shared, from p. 1 use of Elkhorn da build g really soul and h'naical ps nab. cdorls cemetery usukely to la e y mayor .wc neh me, nave �.tow , ry meal deficicall You der, Kate Hampton or Mcammd his _ Ij after,gn ng to have asbc t .sad cone preservation of ca L,I by Jan Anderson editor lead prim but th.ose mre really Adanvs of the yeemarm Mom Catalpa's pre ale I B reek Obama comm on"marpla andim.betatte, Center' Twat Badges,and Mark I . signd a..law Monday n bill to honavotion,ullawlid. Rcava f BmtO C umty ties '�y Containing a provision to re- The buildings,now owner by knudan Destg h.hared mfr s mm the land at the Elkhorn Jefferson County and leased to malitm about what worke,where to Ccmemry to Jefferson County me Jefferson focal Development find fumdaag,and poledual pitfalls far ux as a working cemetery. Corporation,include fender der- Th,cautioned must Idatmic effort.the billsigning.ama mamim classrooms,kitchens and prescrvmam pmJeco pee time and residents had Aeon barred from cafelerim. Mostly of brick con- dedication but pay bie dividends, sing the fusmnc cemetary in snot..,they range an age from indudng employment."Them are recent years because it's locat- the early I says to the l960s n lot morejebs creatd ft., mhe- �- - d on land claimed by the U. Afmra lay-long meeting anddfis- bilitadanprojea ndan[hereaafmm Boston area historic preservation expert Sarah Hanson S.Forest Service.Federal law emomm,the gtuup decided to par- new,moouction,"and Hanle., shares slides of poet projects.(Photo by Jan Anderson) vs it is illegal to bury people sue funding far a sou hood assess- A master plan for the area,a on fajenl property. meet of the buildings,work to get sfim adral assessment,a buy-in to mndanec at Saturday's workshop. The end uw far me haildiug MonuuesSenatorldnx Baucus all ofthe agencies and stakeholders the concepts by all affected par- "Just the fact that all you guys has to he faculty self-sustaining, Monday announced the signing in tits area mgetherfma damneder ties,and a smart tax credit ap,- are here today talking about it is she said,but much of the cost of ofd public lands bill comurne, ofplaos/visaom,and work toward. taring moushey all came highly hoga..that is rere;'sald Hansen. the project can be pm'd formal, .provision b change are dams conceptual sep ahmawma,for fir recommended m early steps.Also Now he a gad firm robe lack- onsts and other fund'.,source, of the cemetery_ tuteusesofndebwiidlngs. important early is dwiding how oupeloterepmrervatimsenccts Thefitstarst,tocondamastrue- "Residents will now have The issues will be discussed the buildings will be used, be- with federal aimulas Abney corn- coral aamnalant of me baildings, a peaceful,scene place to lay again at .Boulder Community cause fiber will drive the redo d- iug ay.ilable,Amid speakers.Bond will probably be around$60,000, Nei,loved ones to rest and In Owedpmem Organization meet- firm decisions,they said. Hansen and Hadmace said Nee lead Hansen and Hampton. pay falls xospens," aid Me to,eat for Tuemd'ay,April 7,ac "In the begioatng.Ne fever are lots of Loans,pso,rums Its Boer wero vary ap hrocc Scuate Demooraf Monday. 7 p.m. at the Boulder lvethshd- of vrlontecorn u going to make cardeme stages of insrooc purer- about the entrance.,for reaovawag Monday's.cfiad musty lay. of Church Fellowship 11.11.'flat all the differemA,, to Hampton. vateed projects.but"I aortic you na the old MDC buildings. to rest an issue that has b«m a meeting is open m ere public. Boulder has an excellent Bran in grin,to have to In very creative as "You guys have so many ideas, [epic of pursuit for years. Hansen was ore of taus present- that area,she said,noting the re- an how you cabble together a fund- and l think a lot of them could See ELKHORN,P 12 era SamNay who ahead smoke of sear Hotiwns Amuse artd the at ivg plan" aid Hampmn. work,"said Hansen. Eagle Glass Resi(en a!•Automo ive• avant cfu� F f ✓CJ'y CQ/YeQfQ Dan i e-Comm by Joseph Martin Clancy -� 033-5360 40 Years Experience y,April 5,2009 at 5:00 p.m. der United Methodist Church r United Methodist Church choir&gate United Methodist Church 1 'cal friends! Everyone %s%.x�%Yed Yo thus✓rex. Etszer musGt✓ce%6rcd%onll Grease come and 6.%.y Y.,elfiends a d Ao Al. owt , FRIDAY, APRI L 17 9 ae 1-1.'the a ape.Camp a•dase.f 930 al tee oond,�a..ear pu..:me s,seas, at d 1 seem% BflDUlga M4 to [e oe.Wetmn9 grams or f no o,e:al "slatted on a DONirChi 'I'THE Rol, N UNCE01� Qua 4 Bachelor's Degree at UM-Helena LUNCH IS w ON US! Thcm'a moo fir gwmg good hands o think.Rvf h m ,Anne srmi depart ef, e.Ara SOONwRhK tlI1MyI ooa 5aas or kgadaamayeumFatana.adu ea Gran or rvttcb help,stack the deck u f.or by melon,awe ihpr�ai..x<an Isdependosr Contractor Fxemprion CeruAcamrrproof o}SYusLerasC p snort Tnsuraneo fa dlwmclym, CM itCLf:Nn 1.find out more about ate I—end m sc who has a hedaperdem Co .nmwr ixemp n Cardficam,vrurwwsv x c m lid M more Depaemant oft b randlndmtry ax The University (R)d 441-9029 When t to genm,g ad hnn L, of Montana-Helena ` - ;x.mee to kaaead ,«,..reeve. n a e.anaaxrae ,. p, fns �� ! �1+�1C�(7 � WWW.MTCONTRACTOR.COM p— r„ ` Attachment B Jefferson County Building #6 Building Condition Report and Building No. 6 -Boulder Development Center Building Assessment and Reuse Plan i y I y ev T Jefferson County,MT 59632 July 23,2014 S MA�R�"TECTs SMA Project No. 1404 page left blank intentionally BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 4 BUILDING k6 1 Boulder,NIT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n x r m Z x m Table of Contents 3 H ti Introduction..........................................................................................7 m x Introduction................. a x Y Program Statement/Preface.................._................................................9 v Executive Summary.................................................. ......,.11 Designteam................................................................................................13 © Building Analysis................................................................................15 Building Description and Const ruction.............................................17 CodeReview........................................._......._............................................19 © Architectural Findings and Recommendations...........................37 Building Exterior Findings......................................................................39 SiteFindings................................................................................................39 Building Interior Findings.....................................................................39 Recommendations....................................................................................40 Annotated Exterior Photographs...................................................41 ® Annotated Interior Photographs....................................................52 © Structural Findings and Recommendations.................................65 Mechanical and Electrical Findings and Recommendations.....71 c v z c a Appendix-Drawings Appendix-Cost Estimates a N 3 y www.archixects-sma.com � SM ' S BUILDING CONDITION REPORT g BUILDING k6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT x r m z x m a p 3 _x z n x A a n x y m n H N L n Introduction Program Statement/Preface Design Team Executive Summary w v z c P ar O F 6 A y j www architects-sma.com SMIN " ? Attachment A The Boulder Monitor Article`-April 2009 Envisioning a Future Built on the Past BUILDING CONDITION REPORT Aerial view of Boulder,MT showing Building#6 at bottom of image-the uppermost'x'shaped building. 8 BUILDING#6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n S r Introduction A 3 At the request of the Jefferson County Commissioners, and structurally,along with recommendations for SMA Architects has been retained to study and potential renovation.The resulting report will assist in n document the conditions of Building #6 on the former determining the future use of the facility - suitability z Montana State Training School (formerly the Montana for remodeling, demolition for new construction, or a = School for the Deaf and Blind) campus near Boulder, continued state of unuse/alternate uses, and minimal a Montana in Jefferson County. maintenance. n Located in the South Campus of the Boulder As the building is on property that may be eligible Development Center,and designed in 1953 by J.G.Link for classification as a Historic District / National Architects,it was originally built in 1954 as housing and Heritage Area, the buiding would be considered as a care for female residents of the school. A twin to this contributing element. In consideration of this situation, building was also constructed to the south for male recommended renovation work should be conducted in residents. The building has had various County uses accordance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards since the closing of this school, and has been vacant for the Rehabilitation of Historic Properties. since the mid-1990's. SMA was able to locate the existing drawings for this The purpose of this report is to present the findings building,and has used them for its analysis,inspection, of the Design Team in regards to the condition of the and recommendations contained within this report. building architecturally,mechanically and electrically, Program Statement / Preface The following document summarizes the findings of the Design Team and Schlenker&McKittrick Architects regarding the study of the existing Building #6. On January 28th, 2014, the members of the Design Team toured the building, photographed and documented its conditions both inside and out,and evaluated them for this report. Also, the team evaluated the existing drawings for consideration of the building and its systems. The findings and recommendations in this Report are based upon field observations made on the date of our inspection. No invasive or destructive demolition occurred to further investigate the building or its systems -the original drawings used by the Design Team were essential in understanding the building's construction and materials.There may be unseen conditions present 0 that were not visible to the Team during the inspection, and this report does not attempt to speculate or address ; any potential issues that are unknown at this time. o 6 9 3 I www.a¢hiteas-sma.com I SM crs 9 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 10 6UILDtNGk6 Souldvc MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I n 2 m 2 Executive Sumary a 3 Based upon the field observations, the Design Team mechancial and electrical systems necessary-essentially, finds that,considering its age,prior uses,and the length all new equipment throughout.The main architectural of time that the building has been out of use(since the upgrades needed are a new roof system,windows and a mid 1990's)it is in good condition regarding the exterior doors,insulation,interior finishes,and other associated y envelope. Built of durable materials (concrete, load cosmetic issues.Abatement of hazardous materials such bearing masonry, steel joists) it's endured its various asasbestosand leadbased paint(LBP)area requirement uses well, and was likely carefully maintained while should any work take place.Such upgrades,iffinancially ^ operated by the original entity. feasible, would provide a durable and serviceable building for the County that should last well into the The elements have taken a toll on the building to future. a limited degree. The roof system is in need of full replacement, and there is associated damage to the Without a well-defined program for reuse and associated interior plaster ceiling and walls in one quadrant from scope and in-depth design and analysis,only a general leakage. Flooring and ceiling materials throughout range of costs can be estimated for performing the are in need of replacement. New windows and doors recommended upgrades in this report. From our must be installed at all openings.A full mechanical and findings and determinations, the estimated range for electrical systems upgrade is also required. Essentially, construction costs for the rehabilitation of Building #6 the majority of the shell of the building itself could be is from approximately $2,475,000 to $3,465,000. This saved if the building were to undergo a full renovation. range does not include fees for professional services. The resultant square foot costs for renovation thus It is assumed for this report that the building is to be range from approximately$102 to$143 per square foot. evaluated for reuse as office or public service space, which results in no change in occupancy or use. Based See the included Estimate later in this report. upon our summary code review,limited changes would be needed to bring the building up to meet current It should be noted that it may be possible to construct code architecturally,with more serious upgrades to the a new,basic office building in the$150 per square foot range, not including land costs or fees for professional services. W 0 Z P W O G a n 3 y I www.architects-smaxom I SMI�M� t i BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 12 BUILDING k6 1 Boul,ler,MT I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I ^ 2 r m 2 x Design Team 3 x Throughout the documentation and evaluation process,Schlenker&McKittrick Architects[SMA]consulted with the A design team listed below,for the documentation and analysis of the existing building and preparation of this report. x a A n_ H m 0 n Owner Jefferson County 118W.Centennial Ave. Boulder,MT 59632 Architect Schlenker&McKittrick Architects,P.C.[SMA] Peter Rudd, Historic Preservation Specialist 50 South Last Chance Gulch,Suite 1 Helena,MT 59601 P 1406.442.4933/F 1406.442.4936 www.architects-sma.com Structural Engineer Beaudette Consulting Engineers, Inc. (BCE) Jami Lorenz, P.E. 129 Stoneridge Dr.Suite 1 A Bozeman,MT 59718 P 406.556-8600 www.bceweb.com Mechanical&Electrical Engineers MKK Consulting Engineers Chris Drake,P.E. P.O.Box 9643 Helena,MT 59604 P 1406.438-1467 www.mkkeng.com w Acknowledgements Schlenker& McKittrick Architects [SMA] and the design team would like to thank the Commissioners and staff of z Jefferson County for their patience and accommodation during the preparation of this document. 0 s 3 H www.archHetts-sma.mm I SMP�� 13 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 14 BUILDING#6 1 Boulder,MT 6NLDNG CONDMON REPORT I ^ x m 2 x m a 3 x Y Y A A D a A S H m n Y u O A Building Analysis Building Description and Construction Code Review W s c u P m O C 6 3 4 I wwwarchitects-sma.com SMA� 13 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 16 BUILDING%61 Boulder,NIT I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n 2 m 2 Building Description: tapered insulation) over metal decking, supported by p open-web steel joists that bear directly on the exterior The existing building is a one story masonry structure, and interior walls below. with approximately 24,340 square feet on its main level. There is a smaller mechancial room located in a partial The existing windows are in place throughout,and they s basement, accessible from an exterior stair, that serves are the original, aluminum, single-pane multi-lite units the building. with lower operable hoppers and improvised screening at operable lites. S The plan for the building is almost perfectly symmetrical in each axis,resulting in fourequal quadrants that housed Existing exterior doors are in place - a mix of solid core separate groups of residents while the building served wood in hollow metal frames with sidelites at main as a dormitory, arranged at 45 degree angles from the entrances and insulated hollow metal at secondary exits. central core. These quadrants house attendant spaces, Door hardware appears to be original or at the least early storage,and bathrooms, linen storage, large day rooms, replacements. large open sleeping rooms for the residents, and large, open shower and toilet rooms. Inside,the building has seen very minimal modifications through the years as its used changed. The central core contains spaces previously used for staff, attendants apartments, reception, isolation, storage, a Interior wall construction is a mixture of concrete (for kitchen, and large open dining room that served the load bearing walls), hollow clay tile (for incidental and residents of all four quadrants. dividing walls)and tile walls furred out with plaster,with acoustic insulation ('sound proofed' walls for privacy While the building has served many different purposes at the previous isolation area). All walls are covered for the county and community since the closing of the with plaster,and faced with ceramic tiles at shower and school,the building has survived with almost no internal bathroom areas previouslyfor patientand staff use.Some remodeling to suit these latter uses.It remains in almost wet areas in bathrooms have FRP panel added as a wall original condition throughout,with only minor upgrades finish,perhaps part of a prior renovation. found during the conductance of the Design Team's survey. Several floorfinishes are present throughout the building. Building Construction: The primary material is the existing floor tile,believed to be asbestos due to size, composition, and vintage.The The building has a concrete foundation and floor stab larger day rooms feature exposed concrete floors at this supportedbya series of concrete ponywalls and footings, time which all slope to several floor drains per area.In the to give a partial crawls pace beneath some areas of the first janitorial, shower, and bathroom areas, polished terrazo floor.There is a basement level mechanical equipment is found, and extends up the wall to form the wall base room accessd from an exterior concrete stairway,which beneath the tile finish. Many other areas and hallways serves the building through this crawlspace with steam feature the floor tile and exposed concrete;it is assumed and water lines around the perimeter to each'quadrant' that whatever other finishes may have been installed of the building. such as carpet have been removed. The exterior walls are constructed of load bearing Ceilings are primarily suspended plaster,with nailed-up masonry, composed of 8" block, cast in place concrete acoustic tiles over wood furring strips in the larger day window headers,and face brick veneer with sloped brick room areas. Newer suspended acoustic ceiling tile has c sills inside and sloped concrete sills at the interior.They been installed in some of these areas, concealing the z are uninsulated. original ceiling which is still in place above. P m The roof structure consists of a newer single ply roof Doors are all the original solid core type with what is a membrane system (membrane, recovery board, and assumed to be original hardware where present. 3 y www.archketts-sma.com J SM17 17 i BUILDING CONDITION REPORT Many of the original plumbing fixtures are in place throughout - drinking fountains, wall mounted sinks in bathrooms and dayrooms,and tubs in the staff and attendant areas.The toilets have been replaced in the bathrooms,whether resident or staff, throughout with newer units.The original toilets have been removed in the quadrant bathrooms and replaced with smaller individual toilet rooms for the previous residents. All kitchen equipment has been removed, leaving only the original counters and casework. See the included Structural,Mechanical,and Electrical sections of this Report for descriptions of these systems. 1s BUILDtNGebl Boutder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n 3: r m x Code Review - 2012 IBC p 3 F Chapter 3:Use&Occupancy z n x Based on this chapter, the building could be repurposed and renovated into any number of new occupancies. It is assumed that the County would primarly use this building to house public services(Business Group B occupancy),civic m purposes(Assembly Group A occupancy),or storage(Storage Group 5 occupancy.)As determined below,the building is N suitable for housing these types of occupancy based on other factors considered in this Code.Changing to any of these assumed occupanices is in fact a change in occupancy from the original dormitory use. Chapter 5:General Building Heights&Areas PerTableS 3 allowable unmodified heights and areas for the specified Occupancies and Bu 1 Ming Construction Type are as follows for the assumed occupancies.Type II-B construction assumed,unsprinklered. Group A-3: 9,500 sf max 2 story/55 feet Group B: 23,000 sf max 3 story/55 feet Group 5-2 39,000 sf max 3 story/55 feet With an area of 24,340 square feet and two stories(considering the partial basement as a story),the existing building will likely qualify for mixed-use occupancy.Also,allowable increases in area may be taken to allow for increased square footage. If the existing and new walls were rated in accordance with Table 601,these areas could be increased.They could also be increased by this code by installing a compliant sprinkler system. From an area standpoint,the existing building is very flexible and could accommodate a wide array of functions,which would ultimately drive any final code review associated with a renovation scheme. For mixed occupancies,Per Table 508.4,Required Separation of Occupancies,with no sprinklering,a 1 hour separation is required between the 5-2 and A occupancies, a 2 hour separation is required between an A-3 and B occupancies,a 2 hour separation is required between an S-2 and B occupancies.This could easily be accomplished in new construction to divide the building as needed into areas of differing occupancies. Chapter 6:Types of Construction Per Section 602,Construction Classification,for this report we classify the existing building as Type II-B,unprotected. A more in depth prescriptive analysis of the existing construction materials could be performed to improve their ratings to reclassify the buiding to a Type II-A construction,but is beyond the scope of this report.It is conservative to assume the unprotected Type II-B construction at this point for the purposes of this report. According to 602.5,Type 11 Cons r cti n the building must be constructed from non-combustible materials for the building elements listed in Table 601:Primary structural frame,bearing walls,interior nonbearing partitions and walls, and floor and roof construction and associated secondary members. The construction of the building - concrete, m masonry,and steel roof construction-meets the requirements of this section and classification. 0 z ti PerTable 602,the required fire-resistance rating for exterior walls based on fire separation distance,in this case exceeding 30'on all sides of the building, is 0.The fire separation distance is taken to the center line of the streets and to the c adjacent building,all of which exceed 30: 3 4 www.archkecn-sma<om I Svl 19 I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I The Building is not required to have fire rated exterior walls or protected/rated structural elements. Chapter 8:Interior Finishes Per Table 803.9, interior finishes in a non sprinklered building of the assumed occupancy areas must have a mixture of Class A,B,and C finishes.While testing and documentation of the existing finishes in this case is beyond the scope of this report due to ptoential renovations,it is believed that the existing materials and modern finishes would easily meet this requirement.Any new finishes and materials must meet the requirements of this section. Chapter 10:Means of Egress A full egress analysis is beyond the scope of this report as the exact use and occupancy/occupancies can only be assumed at this point.However,there are many exits available to occupants around the perimeter of the building,including second exits directly to the exterior from the larger dayrooms,dormitories,and dining room.From an exiting standpoint,during a renovation,it would be simple to add any needed occupancy separations and doors to meet the requirements Of this Chapter. According to Table 1004.1.2, Maximum Floor Area Allowances Per Occupant, the number of occupants possible is as follows for a Group B occupancy(buisness): 24,430 sf/100 sf/occupant=244 occupants Chapter 34:Existing Structures Consultation with the chief building official will be required prior to commencing any alterations or modifications to the building and must be included in the scope of any future projects. Administrative Rules of MT:Minimum Required Plumbing Fixtures While this is an existing facility,it is in a state of unuse,and although it is not required that the facility be upgraded to meet these requirements,it would be required to upgrade plumbing fixtures,toilet accessories,ADA access,etc.throughout the renovated areas of the building,and even then,it is up to the discretion of the chief building official. Code Review- 2012 IECC The building is located in Climate Zone 6,and the requirements for insulation for commercial buildings per this Code is as follows: Roof: R-30 continuous insulation (entirely above deck) Walls: R-13+R-7.5 for metal furring inside building R-20 for wood furring inside building Walls below grade: R-7.5 Veritcal fenestration: U-factor of 0.36 for fixed,0.43 for operable windows,0.77 for entrance doors,SHGC of 0.4. 20 BUILDING x61 Boulaep MT I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT m n x r m 2 7c m A n Considering that this is an existing building with no insulation present other than that found in the roof system, 3 these requirements could be met in the following ways: a Roof: x a A n ti The existing roof system is to be removed in any renovation scheme(see conditions and recommendations further in this report)and replaced with a new insulation package that would meet or exceed the requirements of this code. Walls: To meet the requirements,the uninsulated exterior walls would need to be furred out on the interior,either with metal or wood studs.With metal studs,a layer of rigid insulation would first be installed against the inside surface of the existing exterior walls.The existing wall system in either case would function as a load bearing veneer system. This furring would also accommodate needed electrical/tele/data upgrades. Walls below grade: It is technically infeasible to apply new insulation to the existing walls and foundation system below grade from the exterior,and likely from the interior as well,although the application of rigid insulation from the interior to the inside face of the foundation exposed in the steam tunnels may be possible to meet the requirements of this Code. Windows and doors: As part of any renovation,a complete replacement of all exterior windows and doors is mandatory,in which case meeting the requirements of this code is relatively simple as the replacements must meet the applicable requirements. Code Review- 20121ESC As this is an existing building,and could be considered historic and contributing to the historic district,and it is not required to meet all specific code requirements applicable to new construction,governance by the 2012 International Existing Building Code (referencing the 2012 IBC,analysis earlier in this report) is required and is the main focus of this report.Ultimate compliance during any renovation work must be determined by/with the local code official or authority having jurisdiction. Chapter 3:Compliance Methods c 0 `s Per section 301,Compliance Methods,the building and its required upgrades were evaluated using 301.7.2,Work area compliance method.Repairs,alteration,additions,changes in occupancy,and relocated buildings complying with the W applicable requirements of Chapters S through 13 of this code shall be considered in compliance with the provisions a of this code. a www.architectsamacom I SM 21 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT i Chapter 5:Classification of Work Section 502-Repairs Per 502.1 Scope, as defined in Chapter 2, include the patching or restoration or replacement of damaged materials, elements,equipment or fixtures for the purpose of maintaining such components in good or sound condition with respect to existing loads or performance requirements. Per 502.2,Application,Repair shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 6. Repairs must comply with the provisions of this Section. Section 5Q3-Alteration-Level 1 Per 503.1 Scope,Level t alterations include the removal and replacement or the covering of existing materials,elements, equipment,or fixtures using new materials,elements,equipment,or fixtures that serve the same purpose. Per 502.2,Application,Repair shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 7. Requirements of this section are applicable to this project.Scope of work is beyond the classification of this section. Section 5Q4-Alteration-Level 2 Per 503.1 Scope,Level 2 alterations include the reconfiguration of space,the addition or elimination of any door or window, the reconfiguration or extension of any system,or the installation of any additional equipment. Per 504.2,Application,Repair shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 7 for Level 1 alterations and Chapter 8. Requirements of this section are applicable to this project.Scope of work is beyond the classification of this section. Section 505-Alteration-Level 3 Per 505.1 Scope,Level 3 alterations apply where the work area exceeds 50 percent of the aggregate area of the building. Per 505.2,Application,Repair shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 7 for level 1 alterations and Chapter 8 for Level 2 alterations,as well as the provisions of Chapter S. Requirements of this section are applicable to this project. Remodel area (entire building) exceeds 50 percent of the aggregate area;thus,requirements for Levels 1,2,and 3 must be met. Section 506-Change of Occupancy Per 506.1 Scope,Change of occupancy provisions apply where the activity is classified as a change of occupancy as defined in Chapter 2. Per 506.2,Application,Changes of occupancy shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 10. Requirements of this section are applicable to this project as there is change in occupancy. 22 BUILDING#61 Boulder,MT I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I m n x r m 2 Section 508-Historic Buildinos A 3 Per 508.1 Scope,Historic building provisions shall apply to buildings classified as historic as defined in Chapter 2. y H A n Per 508.2,Application,Except as specifically provided for in Chapter 12, historic buildings shall comply with applicable a provisions of this code for the type of work being performed. i H n Requirements of this section are applicable to this project as it may be considered a contributing historic building to the historic district. ^ Chapter 6:Repairs Section 601 -General Per 601.1 Scope,Repairs as described in Section 502 shall comply with the requirements of this chapter.Repairs to historic buildings need only comply with Chapter 12. Per 601.2, Conformance, The work shall not make the building less conforming than it was before the repair was undertaken. Requirements of this section are applicable to this project as it may be considered a contributing historic building to the historic district;repairs shall comply with the requirements of Chapter 12. Chapter 7:Alterations,Level 1 Section 701 -General Per 701.1 Scope,Level 1 alterations as described in Section 503 shall comply with the requirements of this chapter.Level 1 alterations to historic buildings shall comply with this chapter,except as modified in Chapter 12. Per 701.2,Conformance,An existing building or portion thereof shall not be altered such that the building becomes less safe than its existing condition. Exception:Where the current level of safety or sanitation is proposed to be reduced,the portion altered shall conform to the requirements of the International Building Code. Requirements of this section are applicable to this project as,being classfied as Level 3 Alteration,the requirements for Level 1 and Level 2 Alterations must also be met. Section 702-Building Elements and Materials Per 702.1, Interior Finishes, All newly installed interior wall and ceiling finishes shall comply with Chapter 8 of the International Building Code. c Per 702.2 Interior floor finish, New interior floor finish,including new carpeting used as an interior floor finish material, c z shall comply with Section 804 of the International Building Code. P Per702.31nteriortrim,All newly installed interiortrim materials shall comply with Section 806 of the international Building s Code. " 3 y I w ..amhiteots-sma.com I SMAAK'"1EQ' 23 I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT All new materials used shall be compliant with the requirements of this Section of the Code. Per 702.4 Materials and methods, All new work shall comply with the materials and methods requirements in the International Building Code,International Energy Conservation Code,international Mechanical Code,and International Plumbing Code,as applicable,that specify material standards,detail of installation and connection,joints,penetrations, and continuity of any element,component,or system in the building. All new materials and methods used shall be compliant with the requirements of this Section of the Code. Section 703-Fire Protection Per 703.1,General,Alterations shall be done in a manner that maintains the level of fire protection provided. Alterations,when determined,must meet the requirements of this Section.The addtion of a fully compliant automatic sprinkler system and notification system would vastly improve the Fire Protection level of the existing building in any proposed renovation scheme,and may be required either by code or by the local authority having jurisdiction. Section 704-Means of Egress Per 704.1 General, Repairs shall be done in a manner that maintains the level of protection provided for the means of egress. The current exiting and exit access travel distances are compliant with the 2012 IBC requirements-there are many more than the number required (2) both overall, in each quadrant, and from the larger existing spaces that require 2 exits. The building is unsprinklered,and per the 2012 IBC the maximum allowable travel distance is 200 feet.The number and spacing of the existing exits spaced around the perimeter of the building easily meet this requirement of the code. Section 705-Accessibility Per 705.1 General,A facility that is altered shall comply with the applicable provisions in Sections 705.1.1 through 705.1.14, and Chapter 11 of the International Building Code unless it is technically infeasible.Where compliance with this section is technically infeasible,the alteration shall provide access to the maximum extent that is technically feasible. Per 705.1.1 Entrances,Where an alteration includes alterations to an entrance,and the facility has an accessible entrance on an accessible route, the altered entrance is not required to be accessible unless required by Section 705.2. Signs complying with Section 1110 of the International Building Code shall be provided. Building #6 currently has an accessible entrance at the main entrance to the building, and will be maintained in any renovation. Per 705.1.4 Ramps, Where steeper slopes than allowed by Section 1010.3 of the International Building Code are necessitated by space limitations,the slope of ramps in or providing access to existing facilities shall comply with Table 705.1.4. There are no such space limitations around the perimeter of the building;any needed or improved ramps can easily be accommodated. 24 BUILDING 561 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I x m a x m 9 Per 705.1.10 Toilet rooms,Where it is technically infeasible to alter existing toilet and bathing rooms to be accessible, 3 an accessible family or assisted-use toilet or bathing room constructed in accordance with Section 1109.2.1 of the y International Building Code is permitted.The family or assisted-use toilet or bathing room shall be located on the same n Floor and in the same area as the existing toilet or bathing rooms. A n x The existing building features many toilet room locations that can easily be adapted into new accessible facilities for each H N sex. - v n Per 705.2 Alterations affecting an area containing a primary function,Where an alteration affects the accessibility to a,or contains an area of, primary function,the route to the primary function area shall be accessible.The accessible route to the primary function area shall include toilet facilities or drinking fountains serving the area of primary function. An accessible route shall be provided to the primary function in any renovation scheme of the existing building. Per 705.1.13 Thresholds,The maximum height of thresholds at doorways shall be 3/4 inch (19.1 mm). Such thresholds shall have beveled edges on each side. The existing thresholds are compliant with this requirement;compliance shall be maintained in any renovation. Section 706-Structural Per 706.2 Addition or replacement of roofing or replacement of equipment.,Where addition or replacement of roofing or replacement of equipment results in additional dead loads, structural components supporting such reroofing or equipment shall comply with the gravity load requirements of the International Building Code. Exception 1: not required if the addtional dead load from reroofing or equipment does not increase the force in the element by more than 5 percent. Such increases are not anticipated at this time for renovation,but should be evaluated once a mechanical system upgrade has been designed to ensure compliance with the requirements of this section of the code. Per 706.3.2 Roof diaphragms resisting wind loads in high-wind regions,Where roofing materials are removed from more than 50 percent of the roof diaphragm or section of a building located where the basic wind speed is greaterthan 90 mph or in a special wind region,as defined in Section 1609 of the International Building Code,roof diaphragms,connections of the roof diaphragm to roof framing members, and roof-to-wall connections shall be evaluated for the wind loads specified in the International Building Code, including wind uplift. If the diaphragms and connections in their current condition are not capable of resisting at least 75 percent of those wind loads,they shall be replaced or strengthened in accordance with the loads specified in the International Building Code. As the building is in need of a full roof system replacement,it is required that connections be evaluated accordingly to ensure compliance with this section of the code,and upgraded as needed based on this analysis. Section 707-Energy Conservation 5 0 a Per 707.1 Minimum requirements,Level 1 alterations to existing buildings or structures are permitted without requiring the entire building or structure to comply with the energy requirements of the International Energy Conservation Code or International Residential Code.The alterations shall conform to the energy requirements of the International Energy s Conservation Code or International Residential Code as they relate to new construction only. 3 y I www.mhiteos-smaxom I SM 25 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I While this will be met,the entire building is subject to renovation as a Level 3 Alteration. Chapter 8:Alterations,Level 2 Section 801 -General Per 801.1 Scope,Level 2 alterations as described in Section 504 shall comply with the requirements of this chapter. Per 801.2 Alteration Level 1 compliance, In addition to the requirements of this chapter,all work shall comply with the requirements of Chapter 7. Per 801.3 Compliance, All new construction elements, components, systems, and spaces shall comply with the requirements of the International Building Code. Exceptions: 1. Windows may beadded without requiring compliance with the light and ventilation requirements of the International Building Code. 2. Newly installed electrical equipment shall comply with the requirements of Section 808. 3. The length of dead-end corridors in newly constructed spaces shall only be required to comply with the provisions of Section 805.6. 4. The minimum ceiling height of the newly created habitable and occupiable spaces and corridors shall be 7 feet (2134 mm). Section 803-Building Elements and Materials Per 803.4,803.4 Interior finish,The interior finish of walls and ceilings in exits and corridors in any work area shall comply with the requirements of the International Building Code. Per 804.1.1 Corridor ratings,Where an approved automatic sprinkler system is installed throughout the story,the required fire-resistance rating for any corridor located on the story shall be permitted to be reduced in accordance with the International Building Code. Section 804-Fire Protection Per 804.2 Automatic sprinkler systems,Automatic sprinkler systems shall be provided in accordance with the requirements of Sections 804.2.1 through 804.2.5.Installation requirements shall be in accordance with the International Building Code. Per 804.4 Fire alarm and detection,An approved fire alarm system shall be installed in accordance with Sections 804.4.1 through 804.4.3.Where automatic sprinkler protection is provided in accordance with Section 804.2 and is connected to the building fire alarm system,automatic heat detection shall not be required. An approved automatic fire detection system shall be installed in accordance with the provisions of this code and NFPA 72.Devices,combinations of devices,appliances,and equipment shall be approved.The automatic fire detectors shall be smoke detectors,except that an approved alternative type of detector shall be installed in spaces such as boiler rooms, where products of combustion are present during normal operation in sufficient quantity to actuate a smoke detector. 26 BUILDING X61 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I ri S r m Z Section 805-Means of Egress P s Per 805.1 Scope,The requirements of this section shall be limited to work areas that include exits or corridors shared by more than one tenant within the work area in which Level 2 alterations are being performed,and where specified 'n they shall apply throughout the floor on which the work areas are located or otherwise beyond the work area. a a n x The project could involve multiple tenants in the existing building;therefore,this section could be applicable.As there are multiple exits from each quadrant and larger space, it is assumed that the building has more than the O required number of exits. ^ Per 805.4.1.1 Occupant load and travel distance, In any work area,all rooms and spaces having an occupant load greater than 50 or in which the travel distance to an exit exceeds 75 feet(22 860 mm)shall have a minimum of two egress doorways. Largerareas within the building(former dining area,dormitories)currently have two exits per space. Per 805.4.2 Door swing,In the work area and in the egress path from any work area to the exit discharge,all egress doors serving an occupant load greater than 50 shall swing in the direction of exit travel. All doors either do,or will in the remodel scheme,open in the direction of exit travel. Per 805.4.3 Door closing,In any work area,all doors opening onto an exit passageway at grade or an exit stair shall be self-closing or automatic-closing by listed closing devices. Closers are present on required doors currently and would only be replaced as needed,but not removed. Per 805.5.1 Corridor doors,Corridor doors in the work area shall not be constructed of hollow core wood and shall not contain louvers. Exceptions: 1.Existing doors meeting the requirements of Guidelines on Fire Ratings of Archaic Materials and Assemblies(IEBC Resource A)for a rating of 15 minutes or more shall be accepted as meeting the provisions of this requirement. 2.Door assemblies having a fire protection rating of at least 20 minutes. The existing doors appear to all be solid core doors in hollow metal frames;they were not inspected for ratings in this report,but could in fact be 20 minute rated doors-this will need to be confirmed in any future renovation project. Per 805.6 Dead-end corridors,Dead-end corridors in any work area shall not exceed 35 feet(10 670 mm). Exceptions: 1.Where dead-end corridors of greater length are permitted by the International Building Code. 0 a 2.In other than Group A and H occupancies,the maximum length of an existing dead-end corridor shall be 50 feet (15 240 mm)in buildings equipped throughout with an automatic fire alarm system installed in accordance with the m International Building Code. OC a N 3 ti I wwwarchiWas-smaxom I SM 27 I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 1 3. In other than Group A and H occupancies,the maximum length of an existing dead-end corridor shall be 70 feet (21 356 mm) in buildings equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with the International Building Code. 4.In otherthan Group A and H occupancies,the maximum length of an existing,newly constructed,orextended dead- end corridor shall not exceed 50 feet(15 240 mm) on floors equipped with an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with the International Building Code. The above conditions must be met;the inclusion of a compliant alarm or fire sprinkler system will influence the design parameter of dead end corridor length. Per 805.7 Means-of-egress lighting,Means-of-egress lighting shall be in accordance with this section,as applicable. New emergency lighting fixtures compliant with all applicable codes shall be a part of any renovation scheme. Per 805.8 Exit signs,Exit signs shall be in accordance with this section,as applicable. New compliant exit signs shall be a component of any renovation scheme. Section 806-Accessibility Per 806.1 General,A building,facility,or element that is altered shall comply with this section and Section 705. Section 807-Structural Per 807.1 General,Structural elements and systems within buildings undergoing Level 2 alterations shall comply with this section. Per 807.4 Existing structural elements carrying gravity loads,Alterations shall not reduce the capacity of existing gravity load-carrying structural elements unless it is demonstrated that the elements have the capacity to carry the applicable design gravity loads required by the International Building Code.Existing structural elements supporting any additional gravity loads as a result of the alterations,including the effects of snow drift,shall comply with the International Building Code. Exceptions: 1.Structural elements whose stress is not increased by more than 5 percent. It is not anticipated that any renovation work on the existing structure will increase gravity loads by more than 5 percent. Section 808-Electrical Per 808.1 New installations,All newly installed electrical equipment and wiring relating to work done in any work area shall comply with the materials and methods requirements of Chapter 7. Exception: Electrical equipment and wiring in newly installed partitions and ceilings shall comply with all applicable requirements of NFPA 70. 28 BUILDING r61 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n Z r M All new electrical work shall comply with the requirements of this section. A P 3 n Section 809-Mechanical .a ti A A Per 809.1 Reconfigured or converted spaces,All reconfigured spaces intended for occupancy and all spaces converted s to habitable or occupiable space in any work area shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation in accordance with the International Mechanical Code. m N S Per809.3 Local exhaust,All newly introduced devices,equipment,or operations that produce airborne particulate matter, ^ odors,fumes,vapor,combustion products,gaseous contaminants,pathogenic and allergenic organisms,and microbial contaminants in such quantities as to affect adversely or impair health or cause discomfort to occupants shall be provided with local exhaust. The entire mechanical system would be replaced(our recommendation)in whatever areas are part of a future renovation scheme and as such,will comply with the requirements of this section. Section 810-Plumbing Per 810.1 Minimum fixtures,W here the occupant load of the story is increased by more than 20 percent,plumbing fixtures for the story shall be provided in quantities specified in the International Plumbing Code based on the increased occupant load. Determination of the final occupant load to be used in determining the required number of fixtures will occur when the exact scope of proposed renovations is known;at that time,it will be determined,and the restrooms adjusted accordingly to comply with the requirements of this section. Section 811-Energy Conservation Per 811.1 Minimum requirements,Level 2 alterations to existing buildings or structures are permitted without requiring the entire building or structure to comply with the energy requirements of the International Energy Conservation Code or International Residential Code.The alterations shall conform to the energy requirements of the International Energy Conservation Code or International Residential Code as they relate to new construction only. Mechanical upgrades shall comply with the requirements of this section. Chapter 9:Alterations,Level 3 Per 901.2 Compliance, In addition to the provisions of this chapter,work shall comply with all of the requirements of Chapters 7 and 8.The requirements of Sections 803,804 and 805 shall apply within all work areas whether or not they include exits and corridors shared by more than one tenant and regardless of the occupant load. A renovation scheme could very well encompass the entire building,which exceeds the 50%aggregate requirement for classification as a Level 3 alteration,and therefore the requirements of this Chapter should be considered. c v z v1 u P 07 O G 6 3 y www.architMS-sma.mm SM�RLCrS 29 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT Section 904-Fire Protection Per 904.1 Automatic sprinkler systems,Automatic sprinkler systems shall be provided in all work areas when required by Section 804.2 or this section. Per 904.2 Fire alarm and detection systems,Fire alarm and detection systems complying with Sections 804.4.1 and 804.4.3 shall be provided throughout the building in accordance with the International Building Code. Per 904.2.1 Manual fire alarm systems,Where required by the International Building Code, a manual fire alarm system shall be provided throughout the work area.Alarm notification appliances shall be provided on such floors and shall be automatically activated as required by the International Building Code. Per 904.2.2 Automatic fire detection,Where required bythe International Building Code for new buildings,automatic fire detection systems shall be provided throughout the work area. Section 905-Means of Egress Per 905.2 Means-of-egress lighting, Means of egress from the highest work area floor to the floor of exit discharge shall be provided with artificial lighting within the exit enclosure in accordance with the requirements of the International Building Code. Per 905.3 Exit signs,Means of egress from the highest work area floorto the floor of exit discharge shall be provided with exit signs in accordance with the requirements of the International Building Code. Section 906-Accessibility Per 906.1 General,A building,facility or element that is altered shall comply with this section and Sections 705 and 806. Section 907-Structural Per 907.3 Existing structural elements carrying gravity loads, Existing structural elements carrying gravity loads shall comply with Section 807.4. Per 907.4 Existing structural elements resisting lateral loads,All existing elements of the lateral force-resisting system shall comply with this section. Per 907.4.1 Evaluation and analysis,An engineering evaluation and analysis that establishes the structural adequacy of the altered structure shall be prepared by a registered design professional and submitted to the code official. Per 907.4.3 Limited structural alteration,Where the work does not involve a substantial structural alteration,the existing elements of the lateral load-resisting system shall comply with Section 807.5. It is assumed for this report that minor alterations would be made,and that as stated previously in this report the added gravity loads would not exceed a 5%increase. Per 907.4.4 Wall anchors for concrete and masonry buildings, For any building assigned to Seismic Design Category D, E or F with a structural system consisting of concrete or reinforced masonry walls with a flexible roof diaphragm or u nrei nforced masonry walls with any type of roof diaphragm,the alteration work shall include installation of wall anchors K BUILDING x61 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n S r m Z at the roof line to resist the reduced IBC-level seismic forces,unless an evaluation demonstrates compliance of existing a wall anchorage. 3 x y Determination of needed compliance with this section shall come from a licensed professional engineer. A n x a a Section 908-Energy Conservation Q N m n Per 908.1 Minimum requirements,Level 3 alterations to existing buildings or structures are permitted without requiring Y, X the entire building or structure to comply with the energy requirements of the International Energy Conservation Code ^ or International Residential Code.The alterations shall conform to the energy requirements of the International Energy Conservation Code or International Residential Code as they relate to new construction only. Chapter 10:Change of Occupancy Section 1001 -General Per 1001.3 Change of occupancy classification,Where the occupancy classification of a building changes,the provisions of Sections 1002 through 1012 shall apply.This includes a change of occupancy classification within a group as well as a change of occupancy classification from one group to a different group. The building is changing in occupancy,assumed to a'B,from the previous occupancies of R-1 (dormitory),educational/ classrooms(E-1 or E-2),and office/cooking facilities(B-2).Therefore the requirements of this Chapter are applicable. Section 1003-Building Elements and Materials Per 1003.1 General, Building elements and materials in portions of buildings undergoing a change of occupancy classification shall comply with Section 1012. Section 1004-Fire Protection Per 1004.1 General,Fire protection requirements of Section 1012 shall apply where a building or portions thereof undergo a change of occupancy classification. Section 1005-Means of Egress Per 1005.1 General, Means of egress in portions of buildings undergoing a change of occupancy classification shall comply with Section 1012. Section 1006-Accessibility Per 1006.1 General,Accessibility in portions of buildings undergoing a change of occupancy classification shall comply with Section 1012.8. Section 1007-Structural c 0 z Per 1007.1 Gravity loads,Buildings or portionsthereof subjectto a change of occupancywhere such change in the nature of occupancy results in higher uniform or concentrated loads based on Table 1607.1 of the International Building Code shall comply with the gravity load provisions of the International Building Code. a Exception:Structural elements whose stress is not increased by more than 5 percent. 3 I www.archiwts5 maxom I SML�^"� 31 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT Again,loads are not anticipated to exceed 5%for renovation work. Per 1007.2 Snow and wind loads, Buildings and structures subject to a change of occupancy where such change in the nature of occupancy results in higher wind or snow risk categories based on Table 1604.5 of the International Building Code shall be analyzed and shall comply with the applicable wind or snow load provisions of the International Building Code. Exception:Where the new occupancy with a higher risk category is less than or equal to 10 percent of the total building floor area.The cumulative effect of the area of occupancy changes shall be considered for the purposes of this exception. It is not anticipated that changing to the'B'occupancy wil I cause such a situation,but this will be confirmed with the latest versions of all applicable codes by a licensed structural engineer. Per 1007.3 Seismic loads, Existing buildings with a change of occupancy shall comply with the seismic provisions of Sections 1007.3.1 and 1007.3.2. Per 1007.3.1 Compliance with the International Building Code level seismic forces, Where a building or portion thereof is subject to a change of occupancy that results in the building being assigned to a higher risk category based on Table 1604.5 of the International Building Code;or where such change of occupancy results in a reclassification of a building to a higher hazard category as shown in Table 1012.4;or where a change of a Group M occupancy to a Group A,E,1-1,R-1, R-2 or R-4 occupancy with two-thirds or more of the floors involved in Level 3 alteration work,the building shall comply with the requirements for International Building Code level seismic forces as specified in Section 301.1.4.1 for the new risk category. Exceptions: 1.Group M occupancies being changed to Group A,E,1-1,R-1,R-2 or R-4 occupancies for buildings less than six stories in height and in Seismic Design Category A,B or C. 2.Where approved by the code official, specific detailing provisions required for a new structure are not required to be met where it can be shown that an equivalent level of performance and seismic safety is obtained for the applicable risk category based on the provision for reduced International Building Code level seismic forces as specified in Section 301.1.4.2. 3.Where the area of the new occupancy with a higher hazard category is less than or equal to 10 percent of the total building floor area and the new occupancy is not classified as Risk Category IV. For the purposes of this exception, buildings occupied by two or more occupancies not included in the same Risk category,shall be subject to the provisions of Section 1604.5,1 of the International Building Code.The cumulative effect of the area of occupancy changes shall be considered for the purposes of this exception. 4.Unreinforced masonry bearing wall buildings in Risk Category III when assigned to Seismic Design Category A or B shall be allowed to be strengthened to meet the requirements of Appendix Chapter Al of this code [Guidelines for the Seismic Retrofit of Existing Buildings(GSREB)j. Determination of the required compliance with this section shall be determined by a licensed structural engineer. 32 BUILDING a6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I n S I M z Section 1008-Electrical m a a' 3 Per 1008.2 Unsafe conditions,Where the occupancy of an existing building or part of an existing building is changed,all H unsafe conditions shall be corrected without requiring that all parts of the electrical system comply with NFPA 70. n x a Per 1008.3 Service upgrade,Where the occupancy of an existing building or part of an existing building is changed, electrical service shall be upgraded to meet the requirements of NFPA 70 for the new occupancy. N S Per 1008.4 Number of electrical outlets,Where the occupancy of an existing building or part of an existing building is ^ changed,the number of electrical outlets shall comply with NFPA 70 for the new occupancy. Section 1009-Mechanical Per 1009.1 Mechanical requirements, Where the occupancy of an existing building or part of an existing building is changed such that the new occupancy is subject to different kitchen exhaust requirements or to increased mechanical ventilation requirements in accordance with the International Mechanical Code,the new occupancy shall comply with the intent of the respective International Mechanical Code provisions. Section 1010-Plumbing Per 1010.1 Increased demand,Where the occupancy of an existing building or part of an existing building is changed such that the new occupancy is subject to increased or different plumbing fixture requirements or to increased water supply requirements in accordance with the International Plumbing Code,the new occupancy shall comply with the intent of the respective International Plumbing Code provisions. Section 1011 -Other Requirements Per 1011.1 Light and ventilation, Light and ventilation shall comply with the requirements of the International Building Code forthe new occupancy. Section 1012-Change of Occupancy Classification Per 1012.1 General,The provisions of this section shall apply to buildings or portions thereof undergoing a change of occupancy classification. Per 1012.1.1.1 Change of occupancy classification without separation,Where a portion of an existing building is changed to a new occupancy classification and that portion is not separated from the remainder of the building with fire barriers having a fire-resistance rating as required in the International Building Code for the separate occupancy, the entire building shall comply with all of the requirements of Chapter 9 applied throughout the building for the most restrictive occupancy classification in the building and with the requirements of this chapter. Per 1012.1.1.2 Change of occupancy classification with separation,Where a portion of an existing building that is changed to a new occupancy classification and that portion is separated from the remainder of the building with fire barriers having a fire-resistance rating as required in the International Building Code for the separate occupancy, that portion c shall comply with all of the requirements of Chapter 9 for the new occupancy classification and with the requirements of o z this chapter. P As the buidling is being reclassified as'B'occupancy throughout(or could be reclassified as mixed-use occupancies)the a requirements of this section are applicable to any renovation. 3 y I www.archlmcts-sma.com I SM 33 I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I Per 1012.2.1 Fire sprinkler system,Where a change in occupancy classification occurs that requires an automatic fire sprinkler system to be provided based on the new occupancy in accordance with Chapter 9 of the International Building Code,such system shall be provided throughout the area where the change of occupancy occurs. Per 1012.2.2 Fire alarm and detection system,Where a change in occupancy classification occurs that requires a fire alarm and detection system to be provided based on the new occupancy in accordance with Chapter 9 of the International Building Code,such system shall be provided throughout the area where the change of occupancy occurs.Existing alarm notification appliances shall be automatically activated throughout the building.Where the building is not equipped with a fire alarm system,alarm notification appliances shall be provided throughout the area where the change of occupancy occurs and shall be automatically activated. When determination of final use and occupancy classfiication, such determinations must be made by a licensed fire protection engineer in accordance with all applicable codes. Per 1012.3 Interior finish, In areas of the building undergoing the change of occupancy classification,the interior finish of walls and ceilings shall comply with the requirements of the International Building Code for the new occupancy classification. Per 1012.4.2 Means of egress for change of use to equal or lower hazard category,W hen a change of occupancy classification is made to an equal or lesser hazard category(higher number)as shown in Table 101 2A,existing elements of the means of egress shall comply with the requirements of Section 905 for the new occupancy classification.Newly constructed or configured means of egress shall comply with the requirements of Chapter 10 of the International Building Code. Per this table,we see that a'B'occupancy is an equal or lower hazard to the current classified existing occupancies;the requirements of this section must be met. Per 1012.4.3 Egress capacity, Egress capacity shall meet or exceed the occupant load as specified in the International Building Code forthe new occupancy. The multiple exits present are assuemed to meet the requirements of this section. Per 1012.5.2 Height and area for change to equal or lesser hazard category,When a change of occupancy classification is made to an equal or lesser hazard category as shown in Table 1012.5,the height and area of the existing building shall be deemed acceptable. Per this table,we see that a'B'occupancy is an equal or lower hazard to the current classified existing occupancies;the exsisting building is assumed to be acceptable. Per 1012.6.2 Exterior wall rating for change of occupancy classification to an equal or lesser hazard category,When a change of occupancy classification is made to an equal or lesser hazard category as shown in Table 1012.6, existing exterior walls,including openings,shall be accepted. Per this table,we see that a'B'occupancy is an equal or lower hazard to the current classified existing occupancies;the exsisting building is assumed to be acceptable. 34 BUILDING 061 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDrr10NREPORT n S r M 2 Per 1012.8 Accessibility,Existing buildings that undergo a change of group or occupancy classification shall comply with p this section. 3 yc z Per 1012.8.1 Partial change in occupancy,Where a portion of the building is changed to a new occupancy classification, n A any alteration shall comply with Sections 705,806 and 906,as applicable. i H m n Per 1012.8.2 Complete change of occupancy, Where an entire building undergoes a change of occupancy,it shall °n comply with Section 1012.8.1 and shall have all of the following accessible features: 1,At least one accessible building entrance. 2.At least one accessible route from an accessible building entrance to primary function areas. 3.Signage complying with Section 1110 of the International Building Code. 4.Accessible parking,where parking is provided. S.At least one accessible passenger loading zone,where loading zones are provided, 6.At least one accessible route connecting accessible parking and accessible passenger loading zones to an accessible entrance. Where it is technically infeasible to comply with the new construction standards for any of these requirements for a change of group or occupancy,the above items shall conform to the requirements to the maximum extent technically feasible. Compliance with the requirements of this Section is easily achievable with minor workto the building,envelope,and surrounding area.The first two items are already present. m c 0 z c P W O C a ro 3 -I I www.archfects-sma.com I SMP� 75 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 3e BUILDING e6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n Z r m z x m A 3 iys 3 n x s A n H m n X n Findings and Recommendations W 0 a c P W O C 6 A 3 ti .wWamhitec[s .mm SM 17 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 38 BUILDING k6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n Z r IM 2 z Findings: a A n Exterior Envelope: Interior: x m 'n Overall, the exterior envelope is in good condition The interior is infaircondition,again considering age and a considering its age and lack of upkeep since length of unuse. _ H abandonment.We noted the following conditions: M Roof leaking is serious at one quadrant,with severe ^ Exterior brick veneer is in very good condition,with plaster and ceiling damage in this area.It is assumed ^ only limited areas of damage - a corner (possible that there is corresponding damage to the existing vehicle impact) and one window sill (undetermined metal roof deck which will need to be repaired as cause)will need repair. part of the reroofing process The original single-pane aluminum windows are in • Moss is growing upthroughfloordrains faircondition but should be considered at the end of • Floor tiles(believed to be asbestos)are cupping and their useful service life brittle from exposure and lack of care The exteriordoors-solidcorewood-aredeteriorated • Ceiling tiles(both acoustic and nailed up)have fallen and in need of replacement.Hollow metal doors and for various reasons throughout frames are in need of repainting. Plaster wall surfaces are in sound condition save for There is some spalling to the exposed face of the the areas damaged by roof leaks concrete foundation and one crack was found,which • Many original plumbing fixtures are still in place did not telegraph up into the brick veneer and is • Interior doors are in good condition(solid core wood) assumed tobe'stable: Interior is in need of thorough cleaning if it is to Exterior rails and guard rails are in need of be renovated to usable space for the County (in replacement with compliant units conjunction with any renovation work) Exterior concrete at stairs and steps is deteriorated and in need of replacement The entire roof system is in need of replacement - down to the existing metal decking. While the membrane appears sound on first glance, walking over it revleals indicators of larger problems. The presence of ice and deteriorated cover board was easily felt underfoot. Lichen is growing at all seams - indicating failure and the 'feeding' from internal vapor pressure and warmth through the roof system The exterior entrance to the basement mechanical room is in need of concrete repair and a new guard rail Site: The existing parking lot needs to be restriped to provide required number of ADA parking spots and as needed to indicated and provide for an accessible route c 0 a n P W O C 6 N 3 y www.amhitects-sma.com I SIVI ^ "'E°TS 39 . _... . ....- BUILDING CONDITION REPORT Recommendations: Code Compliance: These recommendations summarize the required Remove and replace all existing windows with new upgrades for code compliance per the earlier sections of energy effiicent units this report. Remove and replace all exterior doors and hardware Remove and replace the existing roof system - install new fenestration(exterior windows and doors) membrane,recovery board,insulation,flashings,etc. fully compliant with all applicable codes down to the original metal decking. Install new wall insulation system (furred out at Patch spalling concrete at exterior of foundation interior as needed) to comply with all applicable where occurs codes Replace damaged brick sills at windows with Install new roof system and inspect diaphragm southern exposure as needed system to conform with compliance with all Repair deteriorating concrete at walls of stairwell to applicable codes basement mechanical room All new interior finishes shall meet the requirements of the IBC Site: Install all new electrical and lighting systems to comply with the requirements of the IEBC, IBC, and Restripe parking area adjacent to main entrance to all other applicable codes provide required number of ADA parking spots and Install all new mechanical systems to comply with as needed to indicated and provide for an accessible the requirements of the IEBC, IBC, and all other route applicable codes Inspect all concrete sidewalk edges, etc. along • Determine requirement of an automatic fire accessible route and adjust conditions for ADA detection,alarm and suppression system by licensed compliance fire protection engineer in compliance with all applicable codes Interior: Install new ADA compliant restrooms as needed Improvements to the site as needed to provide These recommendations summarize the findings of the an accessible route to satisfy requirements of all Design Team with regards to the conditions found in applicable codes/ADA the interior of the building, and any associated repairs As this is an existing,potentiall historic, building, all needed to meet applicable codes or otherwise. proposed work should be reviewed by all local code officials,the Fire Marshal,the Montana State Historic • Verify and upgrade existing interior finishes as Preservation Office (SHPO) if needed, and all other needed to meet the flame spread requirements authorities having jurisdiction. of the 2012 IBC; all new construction must also be Replace exterior handrails at ramps and stairs with compliant new compliant units, and install at exits/entrances • Replace existing furred acoustic ceiling tile and where they are not present suspended acoustic tile ceilings with new suspended Install new guard rails at exterior entrance to acoustic ceiling tile throughout basement mechancial room Verify ratings and conditions of all interior doors; replace as needed Exterior Envelope: Install all new door hardware throughout Compliance with all requirements regarding the These recommendations summarize the findings of the abatement of all identified hazardous materials per Design Team with regards to the conditions of the various the previous Hazardous Materials Report components of the exterior envelope,and any associated repairs needed to meet applicable codes or otherwise. 40 BUILDING x61 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n 2 z Z x m A 2' 3 x A A a A n H m n n n Annotated Photographs - Exterior 0 s m a W O C 4 N 3 y Annotated Photographs www.architects-sma.com l SM � 41 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 42 BUILDING M6 1 Boulder,MT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n m m z s m A rA 3 n s_ A n D A n_ H m n X n Southern half of east elevation. W c 0 z Lt a P W O C Northern half of east elevation. a m 3 y Annotated Photographs I www.architectssma.com I SMA�� Ai I BUILDINGCONDRIONREPORT I South elevation of end wall.Note ramp systems. View from southeast.Note entrance at intersection of quadrants. 174 BUILDING#61 Boulder,NIT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n Imn 2 r m Z Yea z e � T j Exit at south quadrant intersection.Note condition of doors,roof edge flashing,column base concrete. rt pa¢ t t mv , m 0 c Closeup of existing aluminum single-pane windows.Note added exterior screens. a 3 y Annotated Photographs I www.architects-smaxom I SMA 1 45 _rCONDITION REPORT . . . . . : . . . . p . �\ , . ƒ . . � . � . . • ? . « � w�\ . x 9«� �4 Limited damage e brick veneer mcorner. Ramp r exit from southwest quadrant mm+»_eg for presumed foad 6mraif. 46 BUILDING m Boulder,r Annotated__w BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n t r m Z p q R� ?t �Iil r, I p x a A X I H m a N 9 n South elevation of end wall.Note ramp systems. 3 r... r: v r. rA 0 z m e a m 0 c Exterior view of kitchen area to west,off of dining room. 3 H Annotated Photographs wwwarchiteas-sma.com 1 SMA ' 47 i BUILDING CONDITION REPORT i 1 Ili�l Damaged brick sill at northeast wall of northwest wing,note spalling foundation concrete. t + L w North facing exit and intersection of two northern quadrants. 18 BUILDING#61 Boulder,NIT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n 2 r m Z P: m A 3 is H N A n A D A _n mm n H N A n r� Northeast elevation of northeast wing. 4 a c a z c x 0 e Southeast elevation of northeast wing. 3 4 Annotated Photographs I www.amhite "ma.com I SMA4 ROi 1Kf5 49 BUILDING CONDITION REPO r , Entrance to basement mechanical room.Note non_Am rail,guardrail,spa _tee - . . .� View aroof looking_. z __m___ ____w BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n 2 r m 2 A P 3 R n A w n_ �r m � a � 4 R n FF View of roof looking northeast.Note signs of ponding,lichen at roof seams,bunching membrane. W r V z c x P W O C Typical roof drain condition.Note ponding sediment,bunching roof membrane,lichen.Positive drainage is not occuring on roof. 3 Annotated Photographs I wwwarchMcts-sma.com I SMP � 51 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT View of roof looking northwest.Note ponding,roof bunching. Lichen growing at every roof seam;seams have lost integrity,warm air and moisture pusing out from teh building envelope is feeding the lichen. Sub-membrane conditions felt to be in deteriorated condition from walking the roof itself-a combination of ice and deteriorated recovery board is suspected. 52 BUILDING#61 Boulder,MT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT i t7 S r m 2 A m A N 3 is H A A A D A n H m n H N X n Annotated Photographs - Interior W 0 s P W O C a A 3 y Annotated Photographs I w w.amhaects-sma.com I SMA 53 BUILDING CONDMON REPORT 54 BUILDING#6 1 Boulder,NIT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n Z r m s2 Yn 9 i 3 n s yH A :a Y m H E e N V y f{( A V # 7 # Typical administration/office area. Y4 c 0 z c P W O C Typical bathroom off of admin areas. 3 ti Annotated Photographs w w.amhheas-sma.om 1 SMP 55 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT View of main entrance hallway looking east. A 5 View of main entrance hallway looking west. BUILDING#61 Boulder,MT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n x r m 2 x 3 n b b n a b n x r m n Y a N a } n View of main central hallway looking north. w c v_ z c+ w m 0 e View of main central hallway looking south. 3 y Annotated Photographs I www.amhiteCs-sma.com i SM 57 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT .b G View of day room in northeast quadrant.Note cupping Floor tiles. View of bathroom in northeast quadrant.Toilets previously located at left chase. 58 BUILDING 06 1 Boulder,MT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I n S r m 2 P[ m A P 3 x A n A a A n S y m n y N 9 n Water damage at floor in northeast wing from leaking roof.Note moss,failing plaster,and floor tiles in hallway. ya 3 , � y P M N: n z o -- a e Ceiling in same area from roof leaking.Note clay tile wall. 3 y Annotated Photographs I wwwarchitects-sma.com I SMn 59 M DING CONDITION REPORT y$ry Tom• .... _ �. .. .•., .. View looking north in bathroom of northwest quadrant. M� I L , Corridor along southwest wing. 60 BUILDING kB 1 Boulder,MT Annotated Photographs i BUILDING CONDITION REPORT i S r m Z A m A T 3 x A i1 x b A _n 1^ y n Former dormitory room at northeast wing. 'i r �a` 0 P c C Former dormitory room at northeast wing. 3 H Annotated Photographs I wwwarchitects-sma.com 1 61 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT y Kitchen space at west side of building. Southeast dormitory room looking west. 62 BUILDING a61 Boulder,MT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n S r m Z x m 9 3 n x A b A n_ H m P n More ceiling damage from leaking roof system.Southeast wing. c 0 z n P W O C Northwest dormitory room. A 3 y Annotated Photographs I www.arahitec,Srm.o m I SM 63 j BUILDING CONDITION REPORT j 64 BUILDING M6 1 Boulder,MT Annotated Photographs BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I n 2 Z F m A 3 x H y a n F D a n x H m n H N O n Structural Findings and Recommendations m 0 0 a 3 y Structural Findings and Recommendations w Wamhitects-smaxom I SMA 65 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT WWW'Vt1Wab-CUm April 4,2014 Klint Fisher Schlenker&MctOttnck Architects,P.C. 50 South Last Chance Gulch,Suite i Helena,MT 59601 Re: Building Number 6 South Campus,Boulder Development Center Jefferson County Boulder,MT Mr. Fisher, On Tuesday,January 28th,2014,Tracy Thomas,VT and Lindsey Bosworth,EIT completed a conditions assessment of Building Number 6 on the south campus of the Boulder Development Center.The Intent of the Investigation was to Identify elements of the structure that may require further analysis and that may need to be upgraded if the building is reconditioned fix use,The investigation was performed considering basic life- safety occupancy in accordance wink the international Building Code(IBC)and International Existing Building Code (IEBC)where it may apply. No Figure is west View or Budding Nu!ntier6 destructive investigations or material tests were performed. The findings presented in this report are based on visual observations made during this site visit and a limited analysis of the original plans of the structure. Observations of Structural System Building Number 6 is a single story masonry building built in 1953,in the shape of an*X"with a central building and4 wings..Overall,the building appeared to be in good condition,,considering its age and unoccupied Status with minimal maintenance for an extended period.The majority of concemsand issues lay in the nort..heastwing of the building,which showed significant water damage and interior building deterioration, eT'kc 5traTwtE+.4 Ideas' 05 BUILDING 46 1 Boulder,MT Structural Findings and Recommendations BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I n S r m Z x A bc leflesrson County Building 6 Structural Assessment - 3 x }t i rt 7t I.1 STRUCTURAL a A n x y Foundation and Floor System The original plans of the structure show that the foundation consists of concrete footings and concrete 9 n stem walls with elevated structural slabs for the floor system. The elevated structural slabs span over ' network of 5.6 foot tall mechanical tunnels through the whole building. In each wing,the mechanical tunnels end in a 7 foot tag mechanical room crawlspace.in these locations,the slab is supported with an intermediate concrete m supported on 12. me Inch square concrete columns.One of the mechanical rooms has an access via an exterior stairway.The other mechanical rooms are only accessed via mechanical tunnels and in some locations exterior cellar doors. We did not enter any of the mechanical tunnels to inspect the fecundation; however we did investigate the mechanical room Future 2:Arl of ire surraundirxg OnG ofthe buildxig{Trains accessed via the exterior stairway.In addition;we observed the foundation from the building exterior-At the building exterior we found numerous areas of spall ng concrete and some minor cracking,however it appeared superficial at this point.To prevent further deterioration,we recommend addressing the general water drainage around the entire building,, numerous areas of ice build-up as a result of poor drainage were identified during our site vWt,Overall the structural integrity of the foundation walls appeared to be in good condition,and we did not see any evidence of seltilerrient. a the mechanical space we observed is located underneath the northeast wing of the bulling.The Floor above this basement area is a 5 inch thick structural concrete slab, supported by a steel deck,The steel deckis extremely rusted. and deteriorated(see figure 3). However,after reviewing the original plans of the budding,it is clear the decking was only used as a form and is not critical to the strength of the concrete Floor slab. From below,the majority of concrete slab appeared to be in good condition,however we recommend removing the rusted deck and fully inspecting Figure 3:Austed and deteriorated flour deck as the slab to ensure moisture has not penetrated the concrete seen from medianical,wa,below.the Noah East wing slab and compromised the rebar. From inside the building,the floor tiles on top of this slab were dislodged from moisture damage.We recommend the floor tiles be removed and the concrete slab be inspected from above for cracking and water infiltration.If the steel reinforcement has been exposed to moisture for an extended:period of time,it could be deteriorated enough to compromise the strength of the slab and would need to be ropaired. o z c w m 0 c n T}te 0trengt1x aF �d as° 3 4 Structural Findings and Recommendations I www.amhiteas-sma.com I SMLI°a""°KTS 67 I BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I leffesrson County Building:6Structural Assessment r . .i t) E) Paj 3 STRUCTURAL Wall System yry The typical interior wall system is made up of a 12 inch deep concrete bond beam on top of an 8 inch hollow es clay the bearing.wall.The exterior walls are typically a 25 inch concrete bond beam on top of an 8 inch hollow * x.a clay the bearing wall with single•wythe face.In addition 4 there are 10 inch IS 12 inch concrete columns designated as'stiffener columns"on the original 4:Signs of mild mortar vd a"building drawings that are located in the exterior walls of the Werfor dorm wards. From the exterior,the majority of the face brick appeared to be in good condition.There was minor cracking in some sections of the brick mortar and brick face(Figure 4).The windows and openings were supported by visible steel lintels below the concrete bond beam and they appeared to be performing adequately.From the interior,the majority of the building's walls appeared to be in good co: =}'°a excluding the northeast wing. t; s Figure sit:interior waft in North East wing Figure S&Interior wa8 in North East Wing with Detimituated Plaster Finish on Hollow Clay Tile The northeast section showed signs of severe flooding and water damage,in multiple places,extreme water damage had caused the plaster to break from the interior watts to expose a hollow clay tile structure. Although the plaster was deteriorated,the clay tile appeared to be in good structural condition and should not require any repair. e-F1te 5trengirk of Ideas" 68 BUILDING 061 Boulder,MT Structural Findings and Recommendations BUILDING CONDITION REPORT i n 2 r m 2 X leffesrson County Building 6 Structural Assessment ; F rf'' .i= yy�t��{ I y:}.v. S,T R tf.0 tr It A I,. S a Roof structures The roof structure is supported by series of steel open web bar joists bearing on a concrete beam with 8 m inch hollow clay tile milli walls.The bar joists support a steel root deck above as the roof diaphragm,While we were not n° able to see it,the original plans called for 2 layers of rigid insulation with roofing over the insulation.. At some point since the building was constructed,the original roofing was replaced with a membrane connected to the parapet with a tin parapet cap.A brief analysis of the existing joists shows that they meet current 18C requirements for Iife-safety - - '. gravity loading Including snow loading typical to the area, .FigweS.$orlonts es Jrr�m te€}uw When seen from the exterior,the roof membrane appeared to be intact and in relatively good condition.However,at the seams of the membrane,it was observed that lichen has been growing in the seams of the roof membrane;possibly indicating significant moisture trapped beneath.The possibility that water has been trapped below the membrane could have contributed to deterioration of the steel roof deck below. Since we were unable to verify the condition of the steel roof deck in all locations,a thorough..review of the condition of the roof deck and the roof membrane should be Fgue 7.RoMfinembrone with E. +rip tlrhrn performed prior to future occupancy of the building. Lateral Force Resisting System This building was designed prior to seismic design requirements being present in building c current lateral system in the building consists of the single wythe brick walls at the exterior of the building,as well as three 8 inch x 16 Inch concrete"stiffener columns'at each wing. These.tarturrins are connected to the concrete bond beams and connected into the foundation wall with steel reinforcement that would also provide some limited lateral resistance. The exterior walls consist of the hollow day tile walls with the 4 inch exterior brick veneer, While the hollow clay the may provide limited resistance,they are not recognized as a iegitim ate lateral force resisting elements per current code requirements. Therefore,the 4 inch thick brick wall and the concrete columns act as the only lateral elements for the exterior walls, Under the International Existing Building Code,the lateral system is not required to be upgraded because the change of use does not change the seismic risk i t 1. However,due to the titittle nature of the walls and the few"stiffener columns"In each wing,the building would see fairfy,severe clarrugeto- the structure during a seismic event;and the minimum life-safety requirements allowing octuparms to leave the building is questionable. Because of this exposure to risk in the event of an earthquake,we would recommend a more extensive lateral analysis be performed and a seismic upgrade system be 5 designed with the purpose of determining upgrades that would bring.the building up to minimum life- M P P O Po�FF of C G ,. 3 4 Structural Findingsand Recommendations www.architects-smaxom i SM 69 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT kffesrson County Building 6 Structural Assessment i,• , it t3 bcll;-%;� 5TRI-IC 'TURXL safety standards under the ISC requirements. This could consist of new concrete masonry unit Infill walls with steel reinforcement,or a similar system that would provide for these requirements. In addition,the steel roof deck Is acting as the roof diaphragm in this system,and its connection to the concrete beams and steel joists is a critical part of that system. As such,we recommend inspecting the decking for potential rust issues due to the presence of moisture before further occupancy.At the same time,we also recommend that the connection of the deck to the steel joists and the coniioction of the steel joist to the concrete bond beams be confirmed.These connections are a critical part of the lateral resisting system,and should be confirmed and/or upgraded as necessary to meet the minimum life safety requirements. Summary overall,the majority of the building is in good condition,with the exception of the northeast wing, Consistent exposure to moisture has led to serious cosmetic deterioration with potential degradation to structural elements as well,mainly the concrete slabs and roof.Further destructive analysis of this area should be done to determine what portions are salvageable and what needs to be reptaced.This would include removal of flooring in select locations to determine If the slab has cracked and if the rebar has been exposed to moisture, In addition,the steel roof joists and roof deck should be more completely inspected from the inside in all areas by removing the ceiling and removing some areas of the existing.... roof membrane...The source of the moisture should be determined to prevent it from becommiga recurring problem.At the existing exterior concrete foundation watts,the exterior grade adjacent to the building should be re-graded or further water control measures put into place to direct moisture away from the building to prevent further freeze/thaw damage to the foundation. Finally,while the building has performed sufficiently to this point,It has not been tested through a.code level seismic event for the area and would not perform adequately in an earthquake.We recommend complete lateral analysis be performed and a seismic upgrade system be designed and installed prior to future occupancy. Sincerely, Prepared By. Reviewed By: Tracy Thomas,EIT lams Lorenz;PE zeaudetteConsulting Engineers,Inc aT"b . 70 BUILDING n61 Boulder,MT structural Findings and Recommendations BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I n S m s x m a 3 x A n x a A n S H m n H N S n Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Findings and Recommendations W 0 i c P W O L 6 3 y www.archltMS-sma.rom SMA��gKf5 71 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 72 BUILDING k6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT x BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT z CBMCK E JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 x Summary The following report summarizes the findings of the facility assessment performed at the Jefferson County Building 6 facility in Boulder, MT. V A Recommendations: Based on the non-operational and physical condition of the systems within the building our recommendation is a complete removal and replacement of all Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing systems. System types are described in more detail later in the report however the following chart indicates the proposed system options and their estimated costs. . r Variable Variable Air Refrigerant Volume 4-pipe Fan DISCIPLINE (VAV) Coil 4PFC Mechanical $25 $20 $25 Plumbing $10 $10 $10 Fire Protection $4 $4 $4 Electrical $20 $20 $20 TOTAL $59 $54 $59 Variable Variable Air Refrigerant Volume 4-pipe Fan DISCIPLINE Base Building* Flow VRF) (VAV) Coil 4PFC % Savings — 35% 23% 20% * Base building and systems energy comparison are based on a basic block model and is not specific to the this building in any way. Comparison is provided to give a general idea of the system energy performance in comparison to its associated cost. 6 Z a 6 Consult more. Consume Less. 3 y .. .archtte s-smaxom I SMA 73 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT cu �� K� BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT s1 � JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 I. EXISTING CONDITIONS The purpose of this section is to give a brief overview of the building and building systems to provide context for sections to follow. It is not intended to present a detailed room by room description of building components or building systems. A. General Building Information 1. History The facility is approximately 25,000 square feet in total area. The building was constructed in 1954 in the south campus of the Boulder Development Center. 2. Building Use The original use of the building was for housing and care for female residents of the Montana State Training School (formerly the Montana School for the Deaf and Blind). Currently the building is unused. B. Mechanical System Information 1. Heating Heating appears to have been originally provided by a steam boiler located within the basement. At some point during the buildings use the boiler appears to have been taken out of service and the building was connected to the campus central plant. Heating was delivered to terminal units throughout the building by a two-pipe steam system that was routed below the floor slab. 2. Cooling The building appears to have not been cooled. 3. Ventilation The building is provided with some fresh air ventilation. The ventilation air is provided to the building though operable windows, unit ventilators, and air intake vents located on the roof. 4. Terminal Units Heating was provided throughout the building by either unit ventilators or by fin-tube baseboard heaters. 5. Controls The HVAC system utilized a pneumatic control system with the air compressor located within the basement/crawl space. 2 Consult more. Consume Less. 74 BUILDING 46 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT S BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT z masaritstrca[tnt,ac. JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 F y 6. Plumbing Much of the plumbing systems are still in place, however the system is old and not usable. As indicated with Figure M4 below, there was previously a concern with lead contamination of the plumbing system. 7. Kitchen There was previously a kitchen within the building. No mechanical related kitchen equipment was present for evaluation. C. Electrical System Information t. Electrical Service and Main Distribution Panel The main electrical service to the building was originally derived from a fenced in transformer vault located in the basement. The transformers have since been removed by the electrical utility, and there is currently no power on site. The electrical utility primary feeder serving the abandoned transformer vault is exposed on the exterior of the building, which does not meet current electrical codes. The transformers fed the Main Distribution Panel (MDP) located in the basement next to the transformer vault. The MDP is a 400 amp panel that feeds six branch panels throughout the building. The MDP was manufactured by Trumbull Electric, which no longer manufactures electrical equipment. The panel is antiquated and is in poor condition. Replacement parts for this panel would be difficult to find, and would be costly compared to newer panelboards. 2. Branch Panelboards The majority of the branch panels throughout the building were manufactured by Trumbull Electric. In general, the panels are antiquated and are in poor condition. Replacement parts for these panels would be difficult to find, and would be costly compared to newer panelboards. Most of the panels have little or no space or spare circuit breakers to support additional loads. Conductors feeding the branch panels are tin-coated copper with braided-type insulation, which are not compliant with current electrical codes and standards. 3. Receptacles and Branch Circuits In general, there is a lack of adequate receptacles and branch circuits throughout the building. Depending on what the intended use of the building is for, most areas would typically need to double 6 z a - < 3 s Consult more. Consume Less. 3 y I wwwar6itects-sma.com I SMA ?5 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT ki JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 the amount of receptacles installed to account for increased modern electrical loads. There are no equipment grounding conductors installed throughout the building, which is not compliant with current electrical codes and standards. There are numerous receptacles located within 6' of water sources that are not ground fault protected (GFCI). Exterior receptacles are also not GFCI protected. Both of these instances are not compliant with current electrical codes and standards. 4. Lighting The majority of the lighting throughout the building consists of 4'-0", surface mounted fixtures, with T12 fluorescent lamps with magnetic ballasts. These fixtures are antiquated and mostly in poor condition. Some rooms contain incandescent fixtures as well. In general, all light fixtures located within the building are poor in energy efficiency compared to newer technologies. Without power available, we could not determine whether or not existing lighting levels meet current standards. There are some battery powered egress lights located throughout the facility. These fixtures are not functional any longer since power has not been present in the building. Additional battery packs would need to be installed to meet current egress lighting codes and standards. Exterior lighting is minimal with only a few lights being installed at exterior doors. Current codes would require adding light fixtures at all exterior doors as well as at ramps and stairs. Exit signs are a combination of incandescent and LED type, and are in poor condition. Lighting is being controlled in all spaces with toggle switches. This does not meet current energy codes. 5. Fire Alarm System The building fire alarm system is comprised of a Simplex Fire Alarm Control Panel (FACP), smoke/heat detectors, pull stations, and homs. This system is a zoned type system that is outdated. There 4 Consult more. Consume Less. 76 BUILDING 46 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I K) BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT PKEKSAC, JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 A X are no visual notification devices (strobes) located within the A building. Fire alarm detection devices are not located throughout a the facility to provide full coverage. Fire alarm pull stations are not i located at each exterior door. This means that the fire alarm m system does not meet current codes and standards. 9 C1 6. Telecommunications Some telecommunications cabling is installed within the building. Telephone enters the building and is terminated at 66 blocks in a wood enclosure. It appears that data transfer was made through the phone system over Category 3 cabling. Cable management throughout the building consists of surface wiremold raceway, and zip tying cables to structure, pipes, etc. This infrastructure would not be adequate for a modern facility. II. RECOMMENDATION A. Existing systems Based on the condition of all the existing mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems in addition that none of these systems have been in operation for over ten years, our recommendation is a full replacement of all mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems throughout the building. B. New Mechanical Systems Based on the desire to have a building that serves multiple types of spaces, any of the following systems would provide the needed zoning and control capabilities. 1. Mechanical Option #1 —Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) — Water Cooled This option would provide a closed system utilizing high efficiency gas fired boilers and a cooling tower system to generate the heating and cooling medium. The air-handlers will be 100% outside air (OSA) units with energy recovery that would deliver neutral air (-70°F) to the building to meet ventilation requirements. The OSA unit would incorporate a heat recovery device to pre-heat and pre- cool outside air using building relief/exhaust air and would include a gas-fired heating section to further temper the air. The zone VRF fan coil units would be located above the ceiling, within or adjacent to each zone. This system will also be protected from freezing with a 33% propylene glycol solution, and the pumping system would utilize variable flow pumping with the use of variable frequency 6 drives (VFD's). This option is very efficient because it can transfer n a 5 6 Consult more. Consume Less. 3 y wwwarchitects-smasom SM�� 77 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT / ro�IwlnwctxwNtErs,iwc. JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 energy through the condenser water loop, from zones that are in need of cooling to zones that are in need of heating, thereby reducing the amount of source energy consumed. During mild weather, the quantity of heat pumps in heating mode and those in cooling mode offset each other, resulting in very low heating/cooling source energy usage. 2. Mechanical Option #2 —Variable Air Volume with reheat Central station Air Handling Unit(s) (AHU) would be located either on the roof or in dedicated mechanical rooms. The AHU's would be zoned as much as possible by the type of usage of similar spaces to maximize energy efficiency. Heating will be provided to all normally occupied spaces by means of heating coils in the air handling units and zone VAV box secondary coils. VAV boxes would be zoned for similar use spaces and exposures. The air handlers will utilize an outdoor air economizer"free cooling" system to provide cooling using outdoor air whenever the outdoor air temperature is appropriate. The control system will also be used to provide a "night purge" to use outside air to pre-cool the building during the cooling season when temperatures allow. Chilled and heating water coils will be provided in the AHU's serving the facility. Gas fired, high-efficiency condensing boilers will be used to generate heating water that will be pumped to the AHU coils and VAV boxes. Water temperatures will be reset as low as possible to meet the heating loads while maximizing the thermal efficiency of the boilers. An electric driven air cooled chiller located outdoors will generate chilled water for the system. Chilled water will be pumped to the AHU chilled water coils to generate space cooling. The chiller will be shut off during winter or low temperature conditions, and the air-handlers will utilize its economizer cycle for building cooling needs. 3. Mechanical Option #3 —4 Pipe Fan Coil Units with Dedicated outside air units This option would provide a four pipe fan coil system that would utilize an air-cooled water chiller and high efficiency gas-fired boilers. The air-handlers would be 100% outside air (OSA) units with energy recovery that would deliver neutral air to non- centralized fan coil units located throughout the building. The OSA units would have energy recovery device to pre-heat and pre-cool outside air using building relief/exhaust air, and would have heating and chilled water coil to further temper the air. The fan coil units would condition room air mixed with the neutral outside air provided Consult more. Consume Less. 78 BUILDING k6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT MBUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT i (OWLTIN6 tNwifils,INC.' .JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 x by the OSA air handlers to satisfy the zone. Individual four-pipe fan coil units will be installed above the ceiling near each zone. High efficiency, gas-fired boilers will provide heating requirements for the heating water loop to supply the system. A pumping system would m circulate the heating water throughout the building. An air cooled chiller will provide chilled water requirements for the system and a pumping system would circulate the chilled water throughout the building. Both systems would be protected from freezing with a 33% propylene glycol mixture. C. New Electrical Systems 1. Electrical Service and Main Distribution Panel The existing electrical service entrance has exceeded its life expectancy and should be removed in its entirety. A new pad- mounted transformer should be installed by the electrical utility. From there, it is recommended that a main disconnect switch should be provided on the exterior of the building. This main disconnect switch could then feed a new Main Distribution Panel located within the facility. 2. Branch Panelboards It is recommended that all branch panels within the building be removed in their entirety. New branch panelboards should be installed throughout, along with new electrical feeders. New panels should be sized with 20% spare capacity for future expansions. 3. Receptacles and Branch Circuits It is our recommendation that all existing receptacles and branch circuits within the building be removed in their entirety. The amount of new receptacles installed in the facility should be adequate for current and future electrical loads. All new branch circuits should be installed per current electrical codes and standards, which contains including equipment grounding conductors in all branch circuits, and installing GFCI receptacles where required by current codes. 4. Lighting It is recommended that all existing light fixtures throughout the building be removed in their entirety. These light fixtures should be replaced with more efficient T8 or T5 fluorescent fixtures with electronic ballasts or LED source fixtures. Light levels should conform to current Illumination Engineering Society (IES) standards. P 7 6 Consult more. Consume Less. 4 ...archi[eas-smatom I SMP� 79 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT m! u#�! NEfu, JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 In order to reduce energy consumption, occupancy sensors and daylight harvesting sensors can be installed in individual rooms. In addition, exterior lights should be controlled via photocell or time clock. Current energy codes require these solutions, or at a minimum, a timed "sweep off" function for turning off all of the lights when the building is unoccupied. Life safety egress lighting needs to be added throughout the interior of the building and also at exterior doors, ramps, and stairs. 5. Fire Alarm System It is recommended that the existing zoned fire alarm system be removed in its entirety. A new digital, addressable fire alarm system should be installed. The new fire alarm system should provide full coverage in the building for detection and for notification. Notification devices should include both visual and audible notifications throughout. 6. Telecommunications It is recommended that the existing telecommunications system components should be removed in their entirety. Depending on the future use of the building, both copper and fiber optic lines may be an option to bring into the facility. New Category 5e or 6 cabling should be installed throughout the building in order to provide flexible options moving into the future. Installing cable tray or J- hooks above accessible ceiling spaces could be used to provide better cable management. a Consult more, Consume Less. gp BUILDING 06 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT j n K) BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT tox'pmygallr[Rsl lac.% JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 a III. EXISTING SYSTEM PHOTOS Figure M1 — Non Functional Mechanical System. H m n S n 4' l _• 3 i �V� 4 d �Ski.3f F i. r 5 LL. Fi ure M2 — Rooftop vents and equipment._ m c 0 a s a 9 a Consult more. Consume Less. 3 y I www.archiivas-sma om I SMA� 81 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT M BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT . o1ME JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 Figure M3 — Existing unit ventilator. c.4Vn m.4 Figure M4— Onsite lead warning. 10 Consult more. Consume Less. 82 BUILDING 661 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT MKKBUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT z roxsumwc[wrdEns,ipc. JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 — 3 x Figure M5 — Existing plumbing chase. A !1 � Z � � n Figure M6 — Fin-tube heater. 1�. a c 0 z n x P a Consult more. Consume Less. 3 y www.whiwts-smaxom I SM 83 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I mOBUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT 6E JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 Figure M7 — Roof drain downspout. Figure M8 — Existing pneumatic compressor. I q 7 IE ,li F= Consult more. Consume Less. 34 BUILDING N61 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 F 4 y a Figure E1 — Existing main distribution panel. a n - m — n E Y }e Figure E2 — Exposed electrical primary. ' A v ' FAY Ili lil ' t C 5 P 13 Consult more. Consume Less, a y w amhiteas-sma.com I SMAi 85 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT M BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT [BIRNUIN4 WINFEIB,INC" JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING F) Figure E3 — Exterior receptacle that is not GFCI protected. Y I F fy F } 4 Figure E4 — Braided type insulated conductors. w 1 h __. _... _...... . .. i4 Consult more. Consume Less. g(� BUILDING k6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n r� BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT i KK JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 n x yH M M S Figure E5— Ungrounded receptacle. a n Y m n H N n Figure E6 —Typical light fixture with T12 lamps and magnetic ballasts. s rt 5 G 15 a Consult more. Consume Less. 3 y I www.architects-smacom I SMA�" 87 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT •�!�EKK JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 Figure E7— Exterior door and ramp with no egress lighting. 5 A°. l� Figure E9 — Existing fire alarm control panel. ,v f i 16 Consult more. Consume Less. 88 BUILDING A6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I n BUILDING CONDITIONS REPORT z taasu aeweteECws,iec JEFFERSON COUNTY BUILDING 6 — ---- - — — -- -- — — 3 yH A Figure E8 — Existing incandescent exit sign. A n H m n v of n 4 knY. Figure El — Existing telephone termination blocks. t N. dN m C O 2 c P 47 a Consult more. Consume Less. 3 y www.amhitects-smax m I SM 89 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT 00 BUILDING k6 1 Boulder,MT BUILDING CONDITION REPORT I 2 m Z F m A 3 F H H A n F a A n H m n H N V n Appendix - Drawings s a x P O C 6 R 3 y AppendixA www.amhttects-sma.com j SMA4°V° 3 hleN rB MOMAckM Nte ,RC.I edWl^9M �VLLfF'YOHr�tN^ m "K "ON L 3rONd —M Se&PPa iaN3 nmmas�x��w uwn ax aara.N rrlemi- w'.»a' Imo> O•`V E g6uippngnluno�uosle�J2(' d's13ZI ITVN�Rilll�{��/�J 8b37IN3'1H�S `Fg' tD ca S¢ ro D I C a `0 0 LL N LL C q a w.n�ireea mre»w�va..�w.•�ww.aw..mamre»ww..�ww�ww.aw..ma —___ wwa...wu��a:®w wa M UM,aN%„'.tlSIM C•• _ - .W.M.W. BNMIs OG iJ W Y1 N iJ S•' CD p 0 y b S b S b m m m m m < m m v m ° - o o > > pi d g� gl � M1 0 A3.0 SCHLENKER& MCKITfRICK ARCHITECTS,P.C. Jefferson County Building path« Eller atldreae here PRPIEGr rao. 14° n eoum umcwuce cuW %r eew, ewx r wea.xvm _ u ONVINfW tl301�GBIN6u1%%9 I-od'B fflm�M'ul-0M"v�uamnI BUILDING CONDITION REPORT BUILDING p6 1 Boulder,MT Appendix BUILDING CONDITION REPORT n x r m 2 F m a 3 n yF_ A n F 9 a n x H m O n L Appendix- Cost Estimates W r v 'z m P m O O 6 3 Cost Estimates www.architecTs-sma.com I JI' BUILDING CONDITION REPORT BUILDING#6 1 Boulder,MT Cost Estimates Mew, ® ro Jefferson County Bulldlnit#6 Renovation-Opinion of Probable Cost 07.11.2014 • 1 Architectural-Demolition 2 Remove E aluminum windows 2,400 SF $ 2.00 - $ 3.00 $ 4,800.00 - $ 7,200.00 3 Remove E roofsystem down to on inal decking 24,340 SF $ 7.00 - $ 9.00 $ 170,380.00 $ 219,060.00 4 Remove E damaged roof deckin 400 SF $ 1.00 - $ 2.00 $ 400.00 $ 800.00 5 Remove E exterior entrance assemblies 60 SF $ 3.00 - $ 5.00 $ 180.00 - $ 300.00 6 Remove E flooring 12,000 SF $ 2.00 - $ 3.00 $ 24,000.00 - $ 36,000.00 7 Remove E sus detl acoustic ceilin tile/furred tole 12,000 SF $ 1.00 - $ 2.00 $ 12,000.00 $ 24,000.00 8 Remove(E)exterior doors 8 hardware 9 EA $ 30.00 - $ 40.00 $ 270.00 - $ 360.00 9 Remove(E)interior door hardware 60 EA $ 10.00 - $ 15.00 $ 600.00 - $_ 900.00 10 Remove E)plumbing fixtures/demo for new ADA bathrooms 4 EA $ 1,000.00 - $ 1,500.00 $ 4,000.00 - $ 6,000.00 12 Architectural-renovation 13 Install(N)aluminum storefront windows throughout 2,400 SF $ 40.00 - $ 50.00 $ 96,000.00 - $ 120,000.00 14 install N aluminum storefront entrances/hardware 60 SF $ 50.00 - $ 60.00 $ 3,000.00 - $ 3,600.00 15 Install N roof decking as required estimated 400 EA $ 2.00 - $ 3.00 $ 800.00 - $ 1,200.00 16 Install N sin I roof membranes stem w4nsulation 24,340 Sr $ 18.00 - $ 21.00 $ 438,120.00 - $ 511,140.00 17 Install N flooring throughout 24,340 EA $ 4.00 - $ 6.00 $ 97,360.00 - $ 146,040.00 18 Instal N insulated,furred out walk at interior ofextedor wells 1,155 LF $ 50.00 - $ 75.00 $ 57,750.00 - $ 86,625.00 19 Paint interior throughout 24,000 SF $ 1,00 - $ 1.50 $ 24,000.00 - $ 36,000.00 _ 20 Install N suspended acoustic will the ceilings throughout 24,340 EA $ 3.00 - $ 5.00 $ 73,020.00 - $ 121,700.00 -21 Instill N exterior insulated doors and hardware 9 EA $ 750.00 - $ 1,OOD.00 $ 6,750.00 - $ 9,000.00 m __-d - _ c 22 Install N interior door hardware 60 EA $ 200.00 -F$ 400.00 $ 12,000.00 - $ 24,000.00 23 Mechancial-renovation z 24 Install N)mechancial systems-o bons r re rt 24,340 EA $ 20.00 - $ 486,800.00 - $ 608,500.00 25 Plumbin -renovation z Install N lumbin u rades r re rt 24,340 EA $ 10.00 - $ 243,400.00 $ 292,080.00 0Electrical-renovation 0 0 28 Install N electrical u radesper report 24,340 EA $ 20.00 - S _ 486,800.00 - $ 584,160.00 v 29 Fire Protection-renovation _ 8 30 Instal N Bre protection up rades per rapori 24,340 EA $ 4.00 - $ 5.00 S 97,360.00 $ 121,700.00 31 y".. New Copstructlan Su ' °' '" It 2,123,160.09 A ys,.-. �., i,,, y.2,695746.90 32 33 Hazardous Materials Survey o ice_ 34 Asbestos/I_ued band paint survey/lab tcst/rcport 1 EA $ 7,000.00 $ 9,000.00 S 7,000.00 - $ 9,000.00 .gym. 35 :', Hazardous Materials Subtotal $ 7,000.00 " 3 36 - rp 37 • '� rt er N 38 39 2015 Inflation Cost Multiplier(5%) $ 2,459,929.60 $ 3,111,533.25 F 40 F 41 General Costs _ _- -- 42 Contractor General Conditions(10%) 1 LS $ 245,992.95 - $ 311,153.33 $ 245,992.95 - $ 311,153.33 A 43 Contractor 1 LS $ 12,299.65 - $ 15,557.67 $ 12,299.65 - $ 15,557.67 44 Permits(1%) 1 LS $ 24,599.30 - $ 31,115.33 $ 24,599.30 - $ 31,115.33 d 45 3 46 - 47 U) as -••. r. �• 3 i Page 1 1W'+apino9 1 90 9NIC1In9 'Yd S1J311H3MV MDIH111H>W 2 N3HN31H!)5 BUILDING CONDITION REPORT end of report ag BUILDING k6 1 Boulder,MT TABLE OF • INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................1 PropertyInformation ..........................................................................................................................1 Purpose & Methodology.....................................................................................................................2 Acknowledgments..............................................................................................................................2 Images..................................................................................................................................................2 ExecutiveSummary............................................................................................................................3 GeneralInformation Regarding Potential Hazards..........................................................................4 ARCHITECTURAL ASSESSMENT -EXTERIOR....................................................................................5 General.................................................................................................................................................5 Architectural Assessment-Exterior..................................................................................................6 Sitework...........................................................................................................................................6 Parking.............................................................................................................................................7 ConcreteBase &Steps ..................................................................................................................7 Handrailsat Ramps ........................................................................................................................8 BrickWalls.......................................................................................................................................8 SteelLintels...................................................................................................................................11 Doors..............................................................................................................................................11 Windows........................................................................................................................................13 Roofing & Drainage ......................................................................................................................15 ARCHITECTURAL ASSESSMENT - INTERIOR...................................................................................17 General...............................................................................................................................................17 Architectural Assessment-Interior................................................................................................17 ConcreteFlooring.........................................................................................................................18 VinylTile Flooring.........................................................................................................................19 SheetVinyl Flooring .....................................................................................................................20 TerrazzoFlooring..........................................................................................................................20 CeramicTile Walls........................................................................................................................21 PlasterWalls..................................................................................................................................23 Ceilings..........................................................................................................................................25 Doors..............................................................................................................................................27 Trim................................................................................................................................................27 Attic................................................................................................................................................28 Insulation.......................................................................................................................................28 HazardousMaterials.........................................................................................................................29 Asbestos-Containing Materials...................................................................................................29 Lead-Based Paint..........................................................................................................................29 STRUCTURALASSESSMENT..............................................................................................................30 GeneralDiscussion ..........................................................................................................................30 Foundation ....................................................................................................................................30 FloorSystem.................................................................................................................................30 MasonryWalls...............................................................................................................................30 SteelLintels...................................................................................................................................31 RoofFraming.................................................................................................................................31 SeismicAnalysis...........................................................................................................................31 Summary........................................................................................................................................31 HVACSYSTEMS....................................................................................................................................33 PLUMBINGSYSTEMS...........................................................................................................................34 ELECTRICAL SERVICE AND DISTRIBUTION.....................................................................................35 ELECTRICALLIGHTING.......................................................................................................................36 ACCESSIBILITYREVIEW.....................................................................................................................37 Building No. 6 Assessment Table of Contents - i Boulder, Montana CODEREVIEW......................................................................................................................................39 Summary of Revisions Required by Code .....................................................................................47 SCOPEOF WORK& ESTIMATE..........................................................................................................49 Recommendations for Scope of Work............................................................................................49 ConstructionCost Estimate.............................................................................................................50 APPENDIX .............................................................................................................................................53 TestResults.......................................................................................................................................53 PriorDocumentation ........................................................................................................................53 ARDEXProject Case Studies...........................................................................................................53 Building No. 6 Assessment Table of Contents - ii Boulder, Montana L INTRODUCTION Property Information Property Name: Building Number 6 (Former mixed occupancy building with classrooms, dormitories, office spaces, and cooking facilities2) Property Location: South Campus Boulder Development Center Boulder, Montana _ Jefferson County Figure 1: Building No. 6 has four wings that Owner(Current): extend from the central core of the building. Jefferson County Building Area: 24,400 s.f. Integrity: � Very good Q c✓✓ Historical Status: ' ^ Building No. 6 appears to have been built as one a e 11 of two identical mixed use buildings southwest of the central dining hall of the South Campus. It is identical to Building No. 7, which was converted into the site's administration building c.2000. Building No. 6 remains with a collection of o buildings what was originally inall called the w;U 'r �� : ':•i•xat�A»}� i;it ky Montana Deaf & Dumb Asylum (renamed the Montana School for the Deaf & Blind), to which the US Congress had granted 50,000 acres. The complex opened in 1893 and grew as a school for Figure , N 6 is Site plan of the South Boulder deaf, blind, and mentally challenged students. Campus, provided by JLDC. Building No. The entire campus is considered potentially circled. eligible for listing as a Historic District / National Heritage Area.3 Building No. 6 would be considered contributing to this potential historic district. s This description is based upon the classification provided by the Deputy State Fire Marshal to Mark S. s Jefferson County, Resolution 10-2007: "Cultural Delaney in his March 4, 1999 letter summarizing the Resolution" To Encourage Arts, Culture, Tribal Arts & fire safety inspection of Building No. 7 (the "twin" of Culture, Historic Preservation, Archaeology, Building No. 6) prior to its renovation. See Appendix Humanities, Genealogy, Natural and heritage Tourism, for letter. Landscapes, etc. and Related Economic Sector Building No. 6 Assessment Introduction - 1 Boulder, Montana Construction Date: 1954° CTA reviewed all the drawings for buildings in Original Architect: Unknown Boulder that are housed at the Special Collections at the Montana State University Builder/Contractor: Library in Bozeman, in the hope of finding the Unknown original construction documents. The State Architect & Engineer Department searched Purpose & Methodology through their archives as well. We were unable to CTA Architects Engineers (CTA) was engaged in locate original drawings at either location; September 2009 by the Jefferson Local therefore have utilized the sketch plan of the Development Corporations to provide a Condition building provided by JLDC. Assessment for Building No. 6 at the South Campus of the Boulder Development Center. This report reflects observations on the dates of The assessment is to ascertain the items required the inspections. The inspections were based on to bring the building up to code for general office those building components accessible to view; and storage use, as required for existing some material probes and selective removal buildings, and to identify conditions requiring supplemented the visible evidence where repair. This is to be supplemented by an action necessary. CTA makes no representations plan with budget estimates for rehabilitating the regarding latent or concealed defects that may building exterior and interior and resolving exist in the building. This report is made only in building code and systems deficiencies. All of the best exercise of our ability and judgment. Not these actions are to conform with the Secretary of all locations of all materials are described herein, the Interior's Standards for the Rehabilitation of yet all areas of concern are addressed. Historic Properties. Acknowledgments The Boulder Development Center is hereinafter CTA would like to thank the following for their referred to as the "Center' and Jefferson Local assistance with the preparation of this report, and Development Corporation as "JLDC." apologize for the omission of any we've neglected to mention: CTA visited the site on September 28, October 6, 2009, and January 15, 2010 to examine the Bruce, Boulder Developmental Center building and conduct a visual assessment of the Kate Hampton, Montana Preservation walls, windows, doors, roofs, interior finishes, Alliance accessibility, and structural, mechanical, Tara Mastel, Jefferson Local Development plumbing, and electrical systems. CTA's team Corporation was comprised of Historic Preservation Services Kim Allen Scott, MSU Special Collections director Lesley M. Gilmore, AIA, structural Candice Stout, State A & E engineer David French, P.E., electrical engineer Alan Bronec, P.E., and mechanical engineer Images Nathan Ratz, P.E. Some historical information Unless noted otherwise, all photographs included was provided by JLDC. The Boulder herein have been provided by CTA. The other Development Center staff provided assistance in images used throughout are credited accordingly. accessing the building, and information about how the mechanical systems operated. Opportunities for Current and Future Generations, April 2, 2007. °The construction date has been provided by the Montana Development Center. 5 The Jefferson Local Development Corporation has held a lease of the property since 2001. Building No. 6 Assessment Introduction - 2 Boulder, Montana Executive Summary Building No. 6 is in good shape for its age and state of abandonment; it is believed that the building has been vacant for at least ten years. The building remains fairly clean. The building has been neglected and allowed to decay; active roof leaks have caused isolated deterioration to plaster finishes. Since it was well constructed of durable materials, it remains quite usable. Fortunately, it has not been subject to misguided efforts to prolong its longevity. This solidly built building is structurally stable and should perform well in a seismic event. The building was originally constructed as a mixed use building that accommodated offices, dormitory rooms, classrooms, and a cooking facility; it is now proposed to accommodate probable office and/or storage use. For code purposes, there is essentially no proposed change in occupancy; hence there are no substantial changes necessary to comply with the building codes. Although, as an existing building, the building needn't comply with all the code provisions that apply to new buildings, modifications are required. A general cost estimate for the recommended scope of work is provided for the site work, exterior work, and the interior work, including the integration of the modified restrooms and kitchen into the building. These breakdowns are included in the Scope of Work. To summarize, the total building rehabilitation for Building No. 6 is estimated to cost $1,887,010 (excluding professional design fees). The project results in a cost of $77.40/square foot, excluding estimated professional design fees. See Scope of Work & Estimate for break- down of costs. Building No. 6 Assessment Introduction - 3 Boulder, Montana General Information Regarding Potential Hazards In accordance with industry standards for renovation of historic properties, commercial and public buildings scheduled for renovation or demolition should be tested for lead and asbestos content. In addition, OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) requires testing for lead content, in order to provide for worker safety as necessary. Representative samples of suspected asbestos-containing materials and lead-based paint were taken as part of this assessment and sent for testing to ascertain potential remediation. CTA cannot be held liable for identification, or lack of identification, of asbestos-containing and lead-containing materials. Full testing in accordance with Montana state law will be required before the renovation project is initiated. Asbestos: Samples were taken of the resilient flooring, flooring adhesive, and interior plaster. Asbestos was detected in the flooring and adhesive samples only. No asbestos was detected in the plaster. This will need to be factored into the scope for repair and for demolition. Lead-Based Paint: A representative sample was taken of interior paint on the plaster. The paint of this sample tested a low positive, requiring worker protection during removal. Caution will need to be taken during removal of any paint that is flaking, which is a limited quantity. Flaking paint presents the greatest hazard, particularly at locations that are accessible to children. Building No. 6 Assessment Introduction -4 Boulder, Montana ARCHITECTURAL front entry. All of the canopies are supported by EXTERIOR steel pipe columns. The rear, west, facade is ASSESSMENT - distinguished by the kitchen extension with larger concrete landing, presumably for unloading. General Building No. 6 was originally used for various functions as noted above, but has been vacant for at least ten years. Designed in the International Style prevalent in the 1940s-1950s, ! it appears like a highly utilitarian building with an insistent symmetry. Large wall surfaces are dedicated to ample banks of windows. This one- story masonry building is composed of four angled wings that meet at a center spine. In plan, it appears as two mirrored Y-shaped wings, like a splayed dumbbell. The center wing features the Rw main entry at the east side of a double-loaded corridor. A cafeteria with a kitchen extension is on the west side of the corridor, opposite the entry. The main corridor stretches to the north Figure 3: Building No. 6s entry is centered in and south to meet the single-loaded corridors of the east facade. It is accentuated with a the flanking Ys. Each of the four Y tips protective roof canopy over the concrete terminates in a large rectangular dormitory space landing area. with ribbon windows at the short ends and copious wall surfaces. The windows provide views of the nearby Elkhorn Mountains and hillsides, as well as ample natural light. These rooms act as transparent boxes, viewed through successive window openings. Short parapet walls (� ell conceal the extensive area of flat roofs that are sloped to drain to interior drains. Kitchen ' The building was constructed with solid masonry Front, east, exterior walls upon a poured-in-place concrete = entry foundation. The hard-fired tapestry face brick is a durable material probably fastened to a brick or clay tile back-up wall. The walls are 12" to 13" a thick. The windowsills are of the same brick, turned on their sides to form rowlock sills. The front (east) entry is demarcated by a canopy that extends over the concrete landing reached by both stairs and flanking ramps. The north and south elevations feature centrally located exit " doors protected by canopies similar to that at the J ~ s The use of these rooms is conjectural, based upon Figure Fi 4: Building No. 6 Floor Plan. North the description of Building No. 7 prior to its renovation g g (see March 4, 1999 letter from the Law Enforcement Plan provided by JLDC. (Not to scale.) Services Division of Montana to Mr. Mark S. Delaney of the Aspen Youth A@emative), and the proximity of sizable shower rooms adjacent to each of these large terminus rooms. See Appendix for this letter. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 5 Boulder, Montana Building No. 6 lends itself to a number of uses, due to its variety of room sizes and room types. It has a logical floor plan, rendered easy to navigate "` " �_• . by ample views to the exterior. The only change made to the building exterior appears to have been the addition of a shed off of the northwest shop room, allowing the building to retain a high degree of historical integrity. Architectural Assessment-Exterior The following assessment of Building No. 6 is organized from the exterior to the interior, from Figure 5: The concrete sidewalk along the the base of the building to the top. The floor plan southeast wall, of the southeast terminus, shown previously depicts the existing extends towards the entry to the right and to the configuration. See Structural Assessment for rear of the building to the left. further information regarding the related structural components. Sitework Description: The site around the building is relatively flat and unadorned; grasses and one tree abut the building. The building is situated between an outer and an inner asphalt drive, providing vehicular access to the front and the rear (kitchen area) of the building. The exits of the terminal dormitory rooms are served with concrete landings and ramps to grade. The north and 7 — " south exits are served with concrete landings and ramps that extend to the sidewalks. The east Figure 6: The dormitories exit to concrete ramps extend to landings that connect to a landings that ramp down to grade. concrete sidewalk that parallels the front wings of the building. These walks convert to ramps at the main entry. The grade is generally consistently about 16" below the top of the concrete foundation wall, except where the grade is ramped up to the north and south exit landings. Condition: The concrete walks, ramps, and landings are generally in good condition, with some minor ' cracking present throughout. While it appears L " that the ramps might be of a compliant slope, it Figure 7: The ramp at the northeast dormitory appears that the guard/handrails are not room extends to the sidewalk adjacent to the compliant. The handrails at the exterior stairs are road. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment-6 Boulder, Montana not compliant and some steps have no handrails. (See Code Analysis.) =" i The grasses seem to be healthy; their location �- adjacent to the building helps the ground absorb ' rain and snowmelt. The tree at the rear of the building does not appear to have negatively impacted the building foundation. Recommendations: The ramps at the primary entry should be measured to confirm compliance with the Americans with Disability Act. The Figure 8: This isolated area of slight spailing is guard/handrails at the ramps and exterior stairs located south of the main entry. should be replaced. An arborist should examine the tree at the west ta side of the building and make recommendations for treatment or replacement. Parking Description: On-street parking is provided on the asphalt roadway in front of the east entry to the building. Figure 9: Vertical cracks are located regularly along the length of the exposed portion of the Condition: foundation wall. A small isolated area of The parking is not striped or identified. spailing, and the rusted reinforcing, is visible at the left. The beveled top is evident here. Recommendations: An accessible parking space should be provided p and identified with striping, marking, and a post «'. sign. r Concrete Base &Steps Description: m The base, visible at all sides of the building, is an 7 ` extension of the concrete foundation wall. The _ base has a beveled top to direct water away from the building wall, and typically extends about 16" Figure 10: The sole tree at the site is close to above grade. the west side of the building, north of the kitchen wing seen at the right edge of the The entries and exits are accessed with concrete photograph. steps and landings, in addition to the ramps noted in Sitework above. the edges. The condition of the foundation walls is typical of the material and the proximity to Condition: grade-related moisture and snow build-up. The landings and steps are typically in excellent Vertical shrinkage cracks are located regularly condition; a little chipping is evident at some of along the length the foundation; there are isolated areas of sp ailing concrete face due to Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 7 Boulder, Montana rusting of internal reinforcing (that does not appear to have had sufficient concrete cover); and water penetration has spelled some surfaces, resulting in some rough concrete faces. Recommendations: Remove loose and spalling concrete; treat exposed reinforcing with rust-inhibitive epoxy; and patch the area with a cementitious patch compound to match the adjacent concrete. Treat the entire area of exposed portion of the concrete foundation wall, all around the building, with a clear penetrating sealant that bridges the vertical "1 cracks and keeps water out of the concrete. Figure 11: Steel pipe handrails at the front steps and ramps. Handrails at Ramps x, Description: ,$ As noted above, there are steel handrails at all the ramps and at the front entry stairway only. These pipe railings are composed of steel top and center rails supported by vertical steel posts. One of the entry ramps has rail extensions at the lower landing. Condition: ; The railings and their attachments to the concrete are generally in good condition. While much of the paint has worn, the metal has not rusted. However the configuration of the handrails is not Figure 12: The railing at the south ramp has code compliant. extensions no longer compliant with code. Recommendations: Replace the handrails with code-compliant railing II systems. See Code Analysis. Brick Walls Description: Building No. 6 is constructed of solid masonry walls of 8" structural clay tile backing6 and face brick for a total thickness, including plaster, of approximately V-2". The brick is laid in running bond, with a Flemish bond every seventh course. 6 Penetrations were not made in the walls, nor were Figure 13: The good condition of the concrete exposures evident. It is assumed that the back-up landing at the south exit is indicative of the walls are of structural clay tile because primary interior landings at the other entries and exits of the walls are of structural clay file. This was a building. construction system typical of the 1950s. It is possible that the back-up of the exterior walls is common brick. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 8 Boulder, Montana The headers of the Flemish course tie into the l back-up wall to provide a cohesive composite wall structure. The exterior brick is a wire-cut corduroy-textured tapestry brick with a broad range of colors: red, orange, brown, dark brown, etc. The walls are set on the concrete foundation which is visible at all walls of the building. True to the minimal decoration typical of International Style buildings — and buildings built " in the 1950s generally — there is no perceived Figure 14: The walls are undecorated and ornamentation on the building. The only variation unornamented, as is typical of the utilitarian in the brick fagade is the bonding as noted above 1954 design. and the use of turned brick for rowlock windowsills. Rowlock sills are typically problematic, in ex joints to water '!+'+t �, P exposing 9 vertical J penetration (rain, snowmelt), and providing a horizontal surface for the collection of snow. Best practices used today include the use of flashing below rowlock sills to prevent further passage of water into the wall below. This strategy does not appear to have been used in the original construction of Building No. 6. is?' Is u The mortar joints are of a light grey-colored mortar with a typical variety of aggregate. The mortar is probably primarily Portland cement 97 & based, with a limited amount of lime, as was typical during the period of construction. The . k t r 01 joints joints were originally tooled to a slightly concave ° ! profile that remains today, yet is slightly eroded. i } Wall areas protected by the entry canopies NO provide the best evidence of original treatment. Isolated areas of joints — some as noted below — have been repointed with a different colored i mortar. The walls —except at the entry canopies - are not protected by any overhanging components. The parapets are covered with a sheet metal flashing that extends and kicks out slightly from the wall plane. Condition: The general field of wall brick is in good condition, Figure 15: The tapestry brick is laid in a with eroded mortar joints at areas of water modified Flemish bond with a Flemish course penetration and from general aging. The joints of (alternating stretchers and headers) every 7th the rowlock sills are generally heavily eroded; course. most of these joints are wide open, despite Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 9 Boulder, Montana previous attempts to repoint them. This in turn has allowed water to penetrate and erode joints in the walls below. This has resulted in some water infiltration into the plaster walls below the windows, which is discussed in the Architectural Assessment— Interior. At two long window openings of the north fagade, and one short window opening south of the entry, the full length of the extended portion of the rowlock sill brick has been cut off to align with the wall plane. The cut was at the cores in the brick, - resulting in an irregular cross section. The Figure 18: The only deviation in brick use on reason for these cuts is unknown; however, iron the building is the turned brick used as rowlock hooks remain below one of these window sills at the windows. openings, indicating that perhaps the sills were sliced off to allow room for long flower boxes. 1, r Figure 16: The rowlock brick has been sliced at Figure 19: The mortar joints of the rowlock sills a window south of the main entry. are typically eroded and open, allowing further water penetration into the wall below. Figure 17: The rowlock 7brick have been severed at two of the long window openings. Figure 20: Close-up of the brick severed at one Iron hooks below this north opening might have of the north window openings. been used for window boxes. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 10 Boulder, Montana Recommendations: The brick walls remain straight and true, with little and Isolated deterioration. The following actions will extend the life of the building, if performed after completion of the Roofing and Drainage items: 1. Repoint open mortar joints. 2. Repoint all joints of rowlock sills. 3. Replace rowlock sill brick at the two north window openings and the one opening a south of the main entry. Use brick that matches the original as closely as possible and is a severe weathering brick. Figure 21: The window and door openings are Through-wall flashing should be spanned with steel lintels. incorporated at this time. Steel Lintels - Description: The heads of all the door and window openings are spanned with steel lintels. These lintels { appear to have a typical bearing of approximately 4", which might be insufficient for the long spans of the wider window openings. Condition: Although the bearing of the longer lintels is questionable, the steel lintels do not appear to have deflected, there is minimal cracking at the bearing brick and some cracked mortar visible at 4` the ends of two to three lintels, yet the windows appear to remain straight and true. See Structural Analysis. Figure 22: The front entry doorway is distinguished by a surround of glazing. The sealant at the lintels is worn, as is the paint on the lintels. There is no evident build-up of rust or resultant rust-jacking (metal expansion). Recommendations: The sealant at the lintels should be replaced and the lintels prepared and repainted. Doors Description: The main entry is centered in the east fagade below the canopy and is comprised of a single stile-and-rail glazed door flanked by sidelites and Figure 23: The south exit doors, shown above, capped with a transom. The full panels of are identical to the north exit doors, except that inoperable glazing — undivided by muntins — are they are unpainted. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 11 Boulder, Montana i typical of the period. The door, trim, and lower panels are of a clear finish wood veneer (which appears to be birch). It appears that the sidelite glazing is a Plexiglas, more resistant to breakage than glass. This door is T-5" wide and 13/:' thick. 3_ The mullions are all of a clear finished soft wood. The hinges are the bronze ball-bearing type designed for heavy and frequent use. w:. The pairs of exit doors at the north and south ' ends of the building are solid core flush wood +' doors that have a vision lite in each leaf and a '. full-width transom above. A center wood mullion provides for latching of the panic bars. The wood 4 t.. doors and trim were originally of a clear finish y veneer; the north doors have been painted. v -1 The other exterior doors are T-wide hollow metal doors that provide exiting from the dormitory rooms and the west kitchen area. They are all fitted with panic hardware, and all have vision Iites (of varying sizes). Full-mortise latching hardware and hinges are .y * 3' standard throughout the building, as are doora '" 4 closers and panic bars. None of the wood doors � - � Q. . are fitted with weatherstripping. Condition: Figure 24: The (hollow metal) exit door from the The main entry door system is in fine condition, west kitchen area is heavily abraded and is with the exception of an extremely worn finish — rusting. there are some areas of bare wood. The latching mechanism requires pinching, hence is not considered accessible. The exterior veneer of 5 ' the bottom rail is worn and flaking. ax,. The veneers of the north and south exit doors are worn and delaminating from the doors. The west kitchen door and frame are rusting and heavily abraded. The remainder of the hollow metal doors are in fair condition. Recommendations: The finishes of the wood doors, sidelites, transoms, and frames should be removed and a Figure 25: Typical hollow metal exit door from modern durable clear finish applied. The delaminating veneers should be replaced. The the rooms at the termini of the Ys. glass and Plexiglas at the front entry should be replaced with laminated safety glass. The hollow metal door and frame at the west kitchen entry Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 12 Boulder, Montana should be replaced in its entirety. The latching hardware should be replaced with hardware that is considered accessible. Windows Description: A major feature — both architecturally and functionally — of Building No. 6 is the extensive _ wall area dedicated to window openings. The - = openings vary in size according to the use beyond, but some of the facades are composed -=t' primarily of glazing. On a clear day, the building Figure 26: Building No. 6 sports a variety of is rendered transparent, whereby one can see windows shapes and sizes, all based upon a through the building to the landscape beyond. standard formula. The windows provide ample connection with the exterior and an opportunity for natural air ventilation. The windows are grouped singly, in pairs and in groups of three, five, six, and seven. All of the windows have the same aluminum sash and mullions, horizontal divisions with large central panes, and an operable bottom pane. These lower sash are hoppers that swing into the building. Most of these operable hoppers are fitted with screens on the exterior — some are of aluminum (presumably original), and some are of wood. The windows have single pane glass and are not thermally broken. Figure 27: The broad expanse of windows at Differing heights lead to differing configurations, the terminus rooms provides views and cross with higher mounted windows in the kitchen and ventilation. a shower rooms; these windows only have two 1' A divisions. The rest of the windows have three horizontal divisions. ' The windows have a steel plate stool that is r beveled on the inside face where it aligns with the plaster wall below. { Condition: The windows are in good condition; however, the sealant at the masonry opening is typically worn. The window operation was not tested. If the operation is stiff, it can be lubricated and rendered operable. A slight crack is common Figure 2s: The lower sash are along the length of the steel stool where it meets the plaster wall below. This is probably due to in-swinging different expansion and contraction of the two hoppers. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 13 Boulder, Montana materials, exacerbated by lack of interior heating Recommendations: during the period of vacancy. The windows should be renovated as follows: The typical concern with single-glazed, non- 1. Replace sealant at all exterior edges of thermally broken windows — especially for glass windows in the masonry openings. that represents such a large percentage of the 2. Lubricate hardware. wall area — is that they are not energy efficient. 3. Install sealant at joint between steel stools Cold air is easily transmitted during winter months and plaster. and warm air is emitted, depending upon the air 4. Install sun-shades at interiors of windows of pressure. In addition, the hot summer sun can the south and west facades. penetrate the glass, resulting in uncomfortably 5. Provide exterior storm windows to windows, warm interior temperatures — particularly at the with divisions aligned with the existing south and west facades. This can be rectified mullions and rails. Provide separate exterior with installation of exterior storm windows storm units that can be alternately fitted with a throughout and interior sun shades at the south screen unit. The glass in the storm units and west facades. should have a low-e coating on the inside face, to improve energy performance. 6. Replace sealant/gasket at glass to frame of primary sash. Figure 29: The sash re on a steel beveled stool that aligns with the aster below. { Ili J11 I— Sd. l R V Fl�-jy a F Figure 31: Example of successful application of Figure 30: Close-up of the typical cracking interior storm sash O k Park, steel sash. (Dole evident at the joint between the steel stool and Learning Center in Oak Park, Illinois.) the plaster wall below. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 14 Boulder, Montana Roofing & Drainages,x° Description: ° Building No. 6 has a flat roof which slopes to interior roof drains located throughout the building. The roof was not accessed during the site visits; anecdotal evidence has been relied upon for the purposes of completing this report. Review of GoogleEarth images clearly reveals a light colored single ply membrane roof covering. 'a Active roof Condition: i drain leak W� JLDC had necessary roof repairs identified by a qualified roofer in May 2009. Royal Construction & Roofing Inc. identified and proposed the following needed repairs at Building No. 6: 5 "We propose to patch two drains in the northwest corner and complete new drain sump made out of Hypalon membrane and reinstall the clamp ring."' This work was authorized by JLDC on June 5, Figure 32: Building No. 6 Floor Plan. North 2009. It is presumed that the work was Plan provided by JLDC. (Not to scale.) completed. The roofing membrane is probably a Hypalon membrane as noted by the roofer; such Recommendations: membranes are light colored and very durable. The roof should be accessed physically to confirm its condition. It is conjectured, based The above proposed work was probably related upon the limited amount of roofing repair to the interior water leaking from roof drains, identified by the roofing contracting company, that similar to that presently visible in the northeast the membrane is in good condition. Further - and southeast angled wings. The water damage given the leaking in the building at locations here is extensive and active. Substantial limited to roof drain locations - that the two roof amounts of plaster have been water-saturated drains identified should be repaired. The and are delaminating from the clay tile walls. The southwest roof drain should be examined as well; metal lath of the plaster ceiling in the shower the Prioritized Scope of Work herein anticipates room of the southeast wing is rusting and the that repairs will be required at this roof drain as paint is delaminating from the saturated plaster. well. The ceiling tiles in the dormitory of the northeast wing are stained from water. The related plaster and wall damage should be repaired after the roof drain leaks are rectified. These isolated areas of damage are indicative of roof drain issues in what is otherwise a solid roofing membrane. ' Royal Construction & Roofing Inc., "Proposal / Contract Upon Completion,"" May 29, 2009. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment - 15 Boulder, Montana I ty t ��yyi r I .qq yy� w �t 1 Building No. 6 Boulder Development Center Boulder, Montana B u i l d i n g Assessment 9 R e u s e P I a n April 19, 2010 Submitted to: Jefferson local Development 3 Corporation Submitted by: 1 CTA/ Historic Preservation Services k R t r.. Figure 33: Water leakage from the roof has caused the water saturated plaster to delaminate from the clay tile wall. Looking south in the northeast dormitory room. V. Figure 34: Water is actively leaking from the roof drain above the northeast shower room. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 16 Boulder, Montana tight space is not conducive to exploration. It is _ presumed that the majority of the floors are ARCHITECTURAL concrete slab on grade. INTERIOR ASSESSMENT - General " The floor plan shown opposite reflects the e existing — and primarily original — configuration of the building. Slight modifications have been the construction of a wood shed off of the northwest terminus (shop) and the addition of several interior partitions. The shed was presumably rs " used for tool storage. The new partitions are W identified by their stud and gypsum board a .',. construction. 3 Original " dormitory The plan is arranged in a splayed dumbbell shape, with single-loaded corridors that all meet Kitchen -'� at the double-loaded corridor (spine) of the centrally located main portion of the building. The central area includes the cafeteria and kitchen on the west, and the entry — flanked by offices and exam rooms on the east. The dormitory rooms — lived in barracks style — were located at the terminus of each dumbbell, adjacent to large shower rooms. Each of these four wings has a classroom as well. Figure 35: Building No. 6 Floor Plan. North Plan provided by JLDC. (Not to scale.) The primary circulation paths are clear, yet aided greatly by exterior views required for orientation, due to the repetitive nature of the configuration. The clarity of the plan retains its strong integrity to the original design, and the materials have not been changed throughout the building. The finishes are typical for the time period, the durability required, and the building's use: hard 3 plaster walls and ceilings, glazed ceramic He walls, terrazzo floors, concrete floors, vinyl tile flooring, and wood trim and doors. Architectural Assessment• Interior The interior assessment of Building No. 6 is organized from the flooring up through the ceiling. Figure 36: One of the piping tunnels, as viewed There is not a full basement beneath the building; from the basement below the northeast there is, however, a partial basement underneath dormitory/shower area. the dormitory and shower area of the northeast wing, as well as concrete tunnels that provide access to piping below the three other shower areas. The extent of the tunnels is unknown. Only the northeast tunnel was accessed, and the Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 17 Boulder, Montana Concrete Flooring - -a Description: b ' The concrete floor structure is exposed in the northeast basement. Throughout the building, most of the concrete has been covered with one of three different finish materials, as described in the sections below. The concrete flooring is only y3 a exposed at the two rooms that flank the west entry vestibule to the kitchen. These rooms _ appear to have been dedicated to janitorial and storage use. In the janitor's room north of the kitchen vestibule, the floor is sloped to a floor drain. Figure 37: Concrete flooring was poured over Concrete overlayment has been applied over a the existing floor of the northwest wing; it is portion of the floor in the shop at the northwest ramped up to the shop area which is fitted with wing. This flooring slopes down to the adjacent floor drains. floor finished with vinyl tile; it also slopes to two floor drains in the body of the concrete floor. dl j I Condition: In the two small rooms where the original concrete slab is exposed, the concrete is in excellent condition. However, in the rest of the building there are large areas of capillary action and moisture migration through the slab. This has caused failure of the vinyl tile adhesive, warping and discoloration of the vinyl tile, and general staining in the indicative water pattern on the tile. This condition is related to the original Figure 38: The vinyl tile of the classroom in the construction of the building. It is assumed that northwest wing is stained from moisture the slabs were not poured over a proper drainage migrating through the concrete floor slab. bed (of gravel) and vapor barrier. Hence, moisture has not been blocked from entering the concrete slab. The moisture evidence is consistent throughout the building, hence not indicative of pipe leakage. Recommendations: Measure the slab moisture to confirm the above findings and to establish a baseline moisture level. Remove the vinyl tile and adhesive, then shotblast the floor to remove the remainder and to slightly scarify the concrete. Apply an epoxy- based moisture control system, over which a self- leveling compound or feather finish will probably Figure 39: Vinyl tiles are lifting from the moisture-laden concrete floor slab. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 18 Boulder, Montana be required to level the floors, then apply a it compatible adhesive and the new finish flooring.8 Vinyl Tile Flooring , r Description: Two distinct applications of vinyl tile occur in Building No. 6. A 12" x 12" tan-colored vinyl tile in laid in the corridors and the two north dormitory rooms. This is distinguished from the 9" x 9"vinyl tile in the classrooms, offices, and south dormitory rooms. The building was probably originally finished with 9" square tile throughout Figure 40: Typical corridor 12" square vinyl tile and replaced with 12" square tile (where present) flooring, of typical stained and lifting condition. at a later date. The 9" square tiles are laid in attractive 94ile alternating patterns of eight tiles surrounding a distinctive center tile (a square donut pattern). - The 12" square tiles in the north dormitory classrooms present a monotone field of tile with regularly spaced light-colored single tiles. Condition: Most of the tiles are in poor condition, delaminating from the concrete substrate, showing excessive water staining (through the concrete slab below) and discoloration, and stained joints. In addition, extensive mold growth Figure 41: The 9" square vinyl tile in the covers much of the tile in the hallway and northeast classroom with efflorescence dormitory room adjacent to the active roof drain generated from the moisture in the concrete leak in the northeast wing. The moisture from the slab. leak has also caused much of the tile to pop away from the substrate. The 9" square tile and its adhesive tested positive v for asbestos content. The 12" square tile was not tested. Recommendations: The 12" square tile and its adhesive should be tested for asbestos content. Until testing, it should be assumed that the 12" tile and its adhesive contain asbestos. All the tile — 9" and 12" — and adhesive should be removed. The materials should be removed in accordance with Figure 42: Excessive mold growth has resulted s Ardex Engineered Cements specializes in moisture from the roof drain leaking near the northeast control products of this nature, intended and used for dormitory room. similar conditions. Several case studies are included in the Appendix. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 19 Boulder, Montana the regulations of the Resilient Floor Covering Institute's "Recommended Work Practices for Removal of Resilient Floor Coverings." See discussion of concrete floor slabs above for moisture issues and recommendations for control; these should occur prior to installation of new tile. Sheet Vinyl Flooring Description: Sheet vinyl flooring was used as a replacement Figure 43: Sheet vinyl was used as a finish flooring in part of the southwest classroom, replacement floor finish along the exterior wall along the exterior window wall. The remainder of of the southwest classroom. the floor is still covered with the original vinyl tile (9" square tile set in square donut pattern). Condition: The sheet vinyl is curling and popping up off the concrete floor slab. This condition is similar to that occurring at the vinyl tile, resulting from moisture in the concrete slab. Recommendations: Remove the sheet vinyl flooring and adhesive. Prepare floor for new finish, following treatment of the concrete slab as noted above. Provide new vinyl tile. Figure 44: The kitchen features terrazzo Boors Terrazzo Flooring and ceramic tile walls. Description: A reddish-hued terrazzo flooring was applied in all the "wet" rooms — the shower rooms, the kitchen, the janitor's closets, and what appears to have been an infirmary area just south of the main entry. The terrazzo was poured in 2'-2" x 2'- 2" square sections with bronze dividers. The concomitant 4" coved base of terrazzo provided for easier maintenance. "Terrazzo is a nonresilient floor surface made of small pieces of marble or other hard stone embedded in a Portland cement matrix. When it has cured, it is ground and then polished to a smooth finish."9 Terrazzo is known for its durability and ease of 9 Walker C. Johnson, `Terrazzo," Twentieth-Century Building Materials: History and Conservation, ed. Thomas C. Jester (The McGraw-Hill Companies, Figure 45: Terrazzo janitor's 1995), p.234. sinks are located throughout the building. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 20 Boulder, Montana maintenance. The coved bases are distinguished Condition: by smaller stone particles than those in the floor. The ceramic tile is generally in excellent condition and well-adhered to the plaster substrate. There Condition: are a few isolated areas where the tile has been The terrazzo — as is typical for this material in removed; some have been replaced with plaster buildings of sound structural condition — is in formed to look like the tile. A few tiles have been excellent condition. There is minimal damage, replaced with a similarly sized tile that doesn't with three slight floor cracks present in the match the original in color. cafeteria and a small area of impact damage at the base in the infirmary. Recommendations: There are few repairs required. Given the Recommendations: difficultly of matching the color of ceramic tile No work is required. The cracks in the cafeteria from the 1950s, if tile is to remain, the patched floor should be monitored for any growth. The areas could be painted with a glossy finish to terrazzo is a durable floor worth retaining. better match the adjacent tile. The tile is a durable material worth retaining. S� I { i� c y# _ Figure 46: An isolated crack in the terrazzo Figure 47: The kitchen walls are clad in a base, probably caused by impact, is located at sanitary glazed ceramic tile. A few tiles have the south door of the infirmary. been replaced with mismatched tiles. Ceramic Tile Walls Description: The walls in the "wet" areas are finished with 6" x - j 6" glazed ceramic tile wainscots (up to a height of 5'-51/2'). The wainscot and the door and window $' surrounds are finished with a bullnose tile and the _ sloped window stools are finished with the ceramic tile. The ceramic treatment is above the terrazzo base. The colors vary throughout the building. Pink is the dominant tile color, featured in the cafeteria, the infirmary, and the southeast shower room. The northwest and northeast shower rooms are finished with an aqua colored tile, and the southwest shower room is finished with a yellow tile that is painted green. Figure 48: The window stools are finished with tile as well. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment-21 Boulder, Montana s Y k �� YT y3 Figure 49: The original tile surround at the doors was removed during the installation of a smaller door. The original tile location has been indicated with a painted border. Figure 50: Broken tile in the southeast shower room has been replaced with painted plaster(in the foreground). Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment-22 Boulder, Montana Plaster Walls Description: The rest of the walls in Building No. 6 are finished ' with a hard coat of plaster that has a rough surface texture. At the exterior walls and interior £ clay tile walls, the plaster is adhered directly to the clay tile structural wall. At interior partition walls, it is keyed to expanded metal lath. The walls are painted. Condition: The plaster is generally in very good condition. There are slight cosmetic cracks that do not Figure 51: The plaster walls are typically in represent any differential settlement of or damage sound condition. to the building, and a few areas where plaster is damaged from moisture penetration. Minimal damage is confined to a small number of exterior wall locations, where moisture has r penetrated the wall through the rowlock brick sills. At these locations — the northeast classroom and the office immediately south of it, the window of the cafeteria, the exterior wall of the southeast corridor, and the northwest wall of the northeast dormitory—efflorescence salts have accumulated on the plaster below the window. This softens the plaster by attacking the binding agent. Figure 52: Plaster has fallen from the water The most severe plaster deterioration is located saturated walls in the northeast wing. at the clay tile walls between the dormitory and shower area of the northeast wing, adjacent to the roof drain leak. Full wall areas of plaster have delaminated from the clay tile substrate, and adjacent areas are saturated with water. Where r ' the roof drain was recently repaired — at the northwest wing — the plaster walls of the corridor and locker rooms are heavily cracked. In a few isolated locations, the paint is flaking off all the plaster walls. This is typically adjacent to roof drain leaks and below exterior windows, prompted by the moisture in the wall. Elsewhere, the paint is typically well adhered to the plaster. A representative paint sample tested below the Figure 53: Plaster below several of the windows limit for harmful lead content; however, the small is efflorescing and bubbling from moisture percentage of lead in the paint will warrant worker penetration. protection when disturbing any painted surfaces. A representative plaster sample tested negative for asbestos content. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment-23 Boulder, Montana Recommendations: The water-saturated and fallen plaster should be removed and patched with a matching plaster (after hafting the source of moisture and letting the clay tile walls dry). The efflorescence salts should be brushed away (they promote more salt build-up), and the plaster tested for soundness. Where soft or delaminating, the plaster should be removed and replaced. Plaster surfaces should be painted throughout to freshen the appearance. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment-24 Boulder, Montana paint in accordance with applicable LBP Ceilings regulations, and repaint. Description: The original plaster ceilings remain throughout the building; and many of them remain exposed in the shower rooms and smaller offices. The original ceilings in the center spine area appear to have been of plaster and 10'-2" above finished floor. Ceilings in the four wings appear to have been 9'-5" above the finished floor, and originally finished with a 12" x 12" acoustical tile either glued to the ceiling or mounted in concealed Z- splines. In the larger spaces and corridors, a subsequent 2' x 4' suspended grid ceiling has been mounted below the earlier acoustic ceiling; this treatment is visible in the dormitories and adjacent corridors, all but one classroom, the infirmary, and the cafeteria. Condition: Where visible, the plaster ceilings are in good condition with the exception of the two areas (northeast and southeast dormitory wings) that have sustained water damage from leaking roof drains. In the southeast wing, large sections of paint are flaking from the soffit, the metal lath is rusting, and portions of the plaster have fallen. Minimal flaking of paint occurs at the top of the window of the northeast office. Both acoustical tile installations are generally in Figure 54: Typical 12" x 12" acoustical the good condition, with the exception of the 12" x 12" ceiling. acoustical tile in the northeast dormitory, above the suspended grid ceiling. Water has saturated pr the tile; about six lie on the floor. A representative paint sample tested below the limit for harmful lead content; however, the small percentage of lead in the paint will warrant worker protection when disturbing any painted surfaces. — A representative plaster sample tested negative y.,. for asbestos content. The acoustical tile were not tested for asbestos content. Recommendations: The damaged plaster and expanded metal lath should be removed from the ceiling areas below Figure 55: Original 12"x 12"acoustical tile has the leaking roof drains. Provide new plaster (or fallen from the original ceiling above the 2'x 4' gypsum board) finishes. Remove the flaking suspended ceiling grid. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 25 Boulder, Montana Remove the water-saturated acoustical tiles from the northeast dormitory, and examine ceiling and roof framing above to ascertain necessary repairs. Retain existing lower suspended ceiling in the dormitory and throughout the building. S%y _ tisY y=C �i Figure 56: The original 12"x 12" acoustical tile is visible above the 2' x 4' suspended ceiling. Northeast dormitory room. Figure 57: The water-saturated plaster ceiling has fallen, exposing rusted metal lath, in the southeast shower room. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment-26 Boulder, Montana Doors Ilp"i„ Description: The doors throughout Building No. 6 are the f ill standard flush solid core light birch veneered "d doors used during the 1950s and 1960s, Most of rl the doors are 3' wide minimum (only the private bathrooms and restrooms are the exception, with 2'-6" wide doors) and 7' tall. Some of the doors k are glazed. ._ The doors are set in 2" hollow metal frames, fitted with bronze hinges (some of which are ball bearing for greater wear), door closers, and cylinder locksets. Most of the locksets have been removed. Where remaining, the locksets have a fe`, chrome finish on the bathroom/restroom side, and =_ bronze finish in the main room. x Condition: The doors are typically in excellent condition, yet e the paint on the frames is worn. Recommendations: Fit the doors with new locksets, providing accessible levers for use by greater numbers of people. Touch up paint on the frames. Trim Figure 58: Typical birch veneer solid core wood Description: doors, set in hollow metal frames. The rooms are simply fitted out with minimal trim: terrazzo and vinyl bases, depending on the floor finish; and hollow metal trim at the doors. The ,_ ,, •; northwest classroom has a painted wood base. The windows are untrimmed; the plaster surround _ meets the window frame. There is typically no crown at the top of the wall. , Condition: The door frames are in good condition. The vinyl base typically is somewhat brittle and loosing adherence to the wall. The painted wood base is abraded, as is typical. Recommendations: Figure 59: The condition of the vinyl base in the Replace the vinyl base throughout, when main corridor is representative of the base replacing vinyl flooring. Prepare and repaint the throughout the building. painted wood base in the northwest classroom. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment-27 Boulder, Montana Attic �I .f tom. Description: None. Condition: k Not applicable. Recommendations: Not applicable. Insulation Figure 60: The northeast classroom has a painted wood base, which should be prepared Description: and repainted. The building does not appear to be insulated. The walls are not insulated; there is no insulation visible in the limited basement area, nor in any of the ceiling cavities. There might be rigid insulation below the roofing membrane, as is customary for the newer Hypalon installations. Such insulation also helps create the necessary slope to drains. Condition: Not applicable. Recommendations: While the 13" thick solid masonry walls don't yield a high R-value, they do present a thermal mass that helps moderate heat gain and loss. Industry experience has found that insulating such walls does little to improve building performance. Better results have been attained by insulating roofs and upgrading windows. Installation of insulation in the cavities between the topmost ceiling and the roof is recommended to help moderate temperatures within the building. Rigid insulation can be installed on top of the roof deck as effectively; there may already be such an insulation in this roof system, since it appears to be a fairly recent installation. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 28 Boulder, Montana Hazardous Materials The sample from the plaster paint tested at This inspection did not include a full-scope 0.011%, below the greater concentration level, assessment of suspected hazardous materials, yet high enough to require worker protection. but several items that typically contribute to Since most of the paint is in sound condition, increased costs during renovation activities were removal is not required. Where flaking paint and tested. The test results are included in the delaminated plaster will be removed, worker Appendix. protection will be required. Asbestos-Containing Materials Recommendations: Description: Follow OSHA and EPA guidelines during removal The following materials used in Building No. 6 of paint. often contain asbestos, hence representative samples were tested: 1. 9"x 9" vinyl tile flooring and adhesive. 2. Plaster Condition: No asbestos was detected in either the base coat or the skim coat of the plaster sample. However, asbestos was detected in the 9" square vinyl tile and the adhesive. Recommendations: Removal of the vinyl tile flooring should follow the Resilient Floor Covering Institute's "Recommended Work Practices for Removal of Resilient Floor Coverings." The 12" square vinyl tile and its adhesive should be tested as well. For the purposes of this report, they are assumed to contain asbestos until tests indicate otherwise. Lead-Based Paint Description: Buildings constructed before 1978 often were painted with lead-based coatings. The painted components of Building No. 6 are the interior plaster walls and the hollow metal door trim. A representative sample of the painted plaster was tested for lead content. Condition: Two threshold limits impact potential renovation activities: 1. Lead Concentration > 0.5%: Regulations required during removal. 2. Lead Concentration >0.01%: Worker protection required during removal. Building No. 6 Assessment Architectural Assessment- 29 Boulder, Montana MA goal rot to I r"wilal- mmmm General Discussion I This section summarizes the conditions observed during a visual walkthrough of the building on September 28, 2009. The following is intended to be a generalized assessment of the conditions, as not all components of the structure were visible. It is assumed that the original structure was adequately designed, and as such our k; assessment is limited to identifying those elements that show signs of distress or Figure 61: Basement Mechanical Room below deterioration that would affect its originally the northeast shower room. The metal deck intended performance. has rusted. Foundation below. The flooring in these areas should be The foundation was not directly observed removed to expose the concrete floor structure throughout the building, however little to no and to determine the extents of the moisture indication of settlement was observed. The only propagation. Any visibly damaged concrete area where a portion of the foundation could be should be repaired or replaced. Beyond these observed was in the mechanical space near the areas, the floor should continue to perform as front entrance of the building. In this room, the designed. inside of the below grade foundation wall could be seen within the room itself and by looking With regards to the mechanical room ceilings, the down the mechanical chases that extend out from metal deck in these areas beneath the main floor the room. No significant signs of cracks or other slab is severely rusted and deteriorated. signs of distress were seen within these portions However, the deck itself was only used to support of the foundation walls. This and the uncracked the concrete while it was wet. Once the concrete condition of the walls indicate that the building cured, it became self supporting. By inspection, foundation remains in good condition and is the concrete above the metal decking looked to performing well. be in good condition. Therefore, the floor slab above the mechanical rooms should continue to Floor System perform adequately even though the deck shows The floor system consists of a concrete slab on significant signs of deterioration. grade with the exception of the portions of the Masonry Walls floor that span the mechanical chases that serve the mechanical system and the areas over the Overall the masonry walls are in good shape. In mechanical rooms. a few localized areas, there were signs of sever deterioration of the brick masonry wall due to a The floor system appeared to be performing well. prolonged exposure to moisture. It is believed There were a number of isolated areas where the the moisture was due to a faulty roof drain. In floor tiles were popping loose from the floor. In these areas, the wall finishes have separated these areas, it is believed to be the result of the from the wall and are severely stained. presence of moisture. It is not clear however what the source of the moisture is. One thought It is recommended that a qualified mason repair is that it could be coming from the all deteriorated mortar joints, and replace all mechanical/plumbing chases that run below the degraded bricks. floor. Another likely scenario is that the slab itself is wicking moisture from the ground surface Building No. 6 Assessment Structural Assessment- 30 Boulder, Montana In addition to the areas noted above, there were II only minor cracks observed with in the remaining wall surfaces. These cracks are not indicative of any significant source of stress on the wall, but rather due to the normal wearing forces on the building. Cracks with an average with of 118`" inch or greater at exterior walls should be repointed to reduce prevent moisture from penetrating the wall and propagating the crack further. Steel Lintels The steel lintels above the openings in the masonry walls all appear to be performing adequately. There are a few minor cracks in the masonry mortar visible at the ends of some lintels. The cracks in the mortar should be repointed, and any damaged bricks should be replaced in these areas. Figure 62: The steel Lintels are in good condition, but have caused slight cracking at a Roof Framing few bearing bricks, such as shown here at the The roof framing was not observed during this west elevation of the southeast wing. site visit, No indications of roof fatigue or distress was observed. It is assumed the roof framing is still performing adequately, and should not be affected by the continued use of the building. Seismic Analysis A seismic analysis was beyond the scope of work for this assessment. However, as an existing building with a change in occupancy category that does not increase the seismic level (relative hazard), the structural system does not need to meet current seismic code. The goal is for assurance of life safety: the building is considered sound enough to withstand a seismic event at least long enough for all occupants to exit the building safely. There are a number of voluntary seismic improvements that can be made to the structure to help safeguard the buildings occupants in case of a seismic event. A more detailed seismic analysis could identify these improvements and their associated costs. Summary The building seems to be in relatively good condition. With the exception of the few isolated areas of severe moisture damage, no significant signs of distress were observed. The repairs suggest above should allow the building to see many more years of further use without problem. Building No. 6 Assessment Structural Assessment- 31 Boulder, Montana Blank Back Page Building No. 6 Assessment Structural Assessment- 32 Boulder, Montana HVAC SYSTEMS V'I 4,II Description: The building was originally heated by a two-pipe steam system with steam convector units, finned tube baseboard elements, and unit ventilators. Steam was generated at the south campus central steam plant (which is no longer operational). Outside air was introduced by operable windows and by the unit ventilators. Most of the steam and condensate piping could not be seen because it was located in the perimeter tunnels or in walls. Figure 63: Steam piping is distributed through horizontal chases under the floor slabs. Condition: The building has not been heated for at least 10 years and the heating units and piping infrastructure are in poor condition and are very likely unusable. The campus steam plant has not been operational for several years, and the steam and condensate mains that served the building have been valved shut in the basement mechanical room. It appeared that at most of the exposed heating equipment, the condensate piping was disconnected at the steam traps. Recommendations: A new HVAC system will need to be installed. The new system could be similar to the one that was installed for Building No. 7 across the street, Figure 64: Fin-tube baseboard elements, as with packaged rooftop units. Ductwork could be typically used under the windows of the exterior run tight to the roof structure with new or existing walls. lay-in ceilings installed below the ductwork. :I(dgvp. y l Figure 65: Unit heaters hung from ceilings provide heat towards the center of the building. Building No. 6 Mechanical Assessment- 33 Boulder, Montana • �d9 Description: Domestic cold water was piped to the building from the campus piping distribution tunnel. Toilettshower rooms are located in each of the four pods. There is a small kitchen on the west side of the building. There are also a few single toilet rooms. The plumbing fixtures appear to be original to the building. Most of the piping could not be seen because it was in walls. Condition: Figure 66: The building is fitted with four The building has not been occupied for at least shower rooms that include lavatories (as 10 years and the plumbing fixtures and piping shown) and private toilet rooms. infrastructure is in poor condition and are likely unusable. It appeared that in the main toilet/shower groups, the piping had been y disconnected from the water closets and portions �t � of the piping had been removed in the exposed - "51 w chases. The campus pipe tunnel has not been a m A operational for several years, and the domestic cold water main that served the building has been 'i�ai,( valved off in the basement. t �i Recommendations: «� New domestic water and drain-waste-vent (D-W- V) plumbing systems will need to be installed. Because most of the building is slab-on-grade construction, saw cutting will be required to install Figure 67: Each shower room was fitted with new sewer lines. The campus is currently in the both group showers and private ones. process of installing a new sewer system, and this building should be connected to this system. A gas service will need to be extended to this building to serve a domestic water heater and the new HVAC equipment. A source for domestic water will also need to be determined and a new building service will need to be extended to this building. Building No. 6 Mechanical Assessment- 34 Boulder, Montana ELECTRICAL SERVICE AND DISTRIBUTION Description: The electrical service for Building No. 6 originates inside of a fenced transformer vault located in the basement. The transformers that were originally located in this vault have been removed by the utility company and the facility currently does not have power available. The main distribution panel for the facility consists of a 400 amp, 2081120 volt, 3-phase circuit breaker panelboard. This panel feeds six branch circuit breaker panelboards located throughout the building. Figure 68: The transformer vault and main Feeders to the branch panelboards consist of g distribution panel in the basement. copper conductors concealed in rigid steel conduit that is located in the utility tunnels. Branch circuits throughout the facility consist of copper conductors concealed in EMT conduit. Condition: The service and distribution equipment and wiring throughout the building is over 40 years old and in very poor condition. The panelboards are obsolete and replacement circuit breakers are not available. None of the conduit contains an equipment grounding conductor. Recommendations: The service system equipment, distribution equipment, and wiring throughout the facility have exceeded their useful life expectancies. Complete replacement is recommended. To provide electrical service to the facility, it is recommended that the existing transformer vault be removed and that the utility company install a pad-mounted transformer located on the exterior of the building. Building No. 6 Electrical Assessment- 35 Boulder, Montana 1 Description: The majority of the lighting throughout the facility consists of surface-mounted fluorescent fixtures that utilize T12 lamps and magnetic ballasts. Exit signs are a combination of incandescent type and LED type. Some rooms have recessed incandescent fixtures. Condition: The lighting throughout the facility is in very poor condition and has poor energy efficiency. The facility does not have code compliant emergency lighting. Exit signs do not have battery back-up. sr Recommendations: Complete replacement of the lighting is recommended. The use of energy efficient fluorescent fixtures that utilize T8 lamps and electronic ballasts is recommended. Upgrading the lighting to energy efficient lighting may be eligible to receive rebates from the utility company, thus paying for a portion of the upgrade. Figure 69: Original fluorescent light fixture in the office immediately south of the main entry. ICI,I IIIIII�Illlill Figure 70: Typical newer fluorescent fixtures, in the infirmary. Building No. 6 Electrical Assessment-36 Boulder, Montana 1. Accessible Route: The east entry can be modified to be an accessible route. The ' existing ramps should be confirmed for compliant slope, and fitted with compliant Building No. 6 is an existing historic building. As handrails that also provide edge such, it is not required to comply with all the protection. accessibility requirements that a new building 2, Entrances: The existing door is 3'-5" wide must follow. However, it is imperative that the and has a low threshold. The exterior building be made as accessible as possible, landing is level with the first floor. The within the parameters of its historic character, and east entry can be made accessible with that it comply as nearly as possible with the modifications to the existing hardware. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), except See Code Analysis for recommendation of where not technically feasible to do so. Per ADA, modification to latching hardware. a public accommodation is urged to take 3. Accessible Means of Egress: The measures to comply with the barrier removal entrances and exits already provide an requirements of this section in accordance with accessible means of egress, yet the the following order of priorities: handrails should be replaced with ADA- compliant handrails that also provide edge 1. Provide access from public sidewalks, protection. parking, or public transportation. These 4. Signage: measures include, for example, installing a. Doors at exit passageways should be entrance ramps, widening entrances, and identified by tactile signs per ADA 703. providing accessible parking spaces. b. Parking Spaces: Where provided, 2. Provide access to those areas of a place parking spaces shall be provided in of public accommodation where goods accordance with ADA Section 208.2. and services are made available to the 5. Drinking fountains: Where provided on a public. These measures include, for floor, there shall be no fewer than two example, adjusting the layout of display drinking fountains provided. One shall racks, rearranging tables, providing comply with ADA 602.1 — 602.6, and one Brailled and raised character signage, shall comply with ADA 602.7. widening doors, providing visual alarms, 6. Toilet facilities: The toilet rooms within the and installing ramps. shower rooms comply. The toilet rooms 3. Provide access to restroom facilities. adjacent to offices (east side of double- These measures include, for example, loaded corridor) would need to be removal of obstructing furniture or vending reconfigured, and the doors replaced with machines, widening of doors, installation wider doors, to comply. If these rooms of ramps, providing accessible signage, will not be used by the public, the widening of toilet stalls, and installation of modifications will not be necessary. grab bars. 4. Take any other measures necessary to Recommendations: provide access to the goods, services, 1 Entrances/Exits: facilities, privileges, advantages, or a. Replace latching hardware. accommodations of a place of public b. Replace handrails at exterior ramps. accommodation. 2. Signage: Provide tactile signs to identify Description and Condition: entries and exits. 3. Parking Spaces: Provide striping and signage Section 605 of the 2006 International Existing for one accessible parking space and the Building Code provides guidance for removal of adjacent access aisle. barriers. The following requirements can be met 4. Drinking fountains: Provide two fountains; one in Building No. 6, with a modicum of effort: shall comply with ADA 602.1 — 602.6, and one shall comply with ADA 602.7. Building No. 6 Accessibility Assessment- 37 Boulder, Montana Blank Back Page Building No. 6 Accessibility Assessment- 38 Boulder, Montana Area, Actual: 24,400 square feet CODE REVIEW Area, Allowable per IBC: 37,500 square feet Building No. 6 is considered an existing historic Summary of Code Compliance Determination: building. As such, it is not required to comply Per Article 101.5 of the 2006 International with all the code requirements that a new building Existing Building Code, there are three allowable must follow. However, it is imperative that the compliance methods, one of which needs to be building be made as safe as possible, within the followed for an existing building's renovation work parameters of its historic character, its use, and to comply with the code. They are as follows: its specific location. The following analysis addresses each aspect of the 2006 International (1) Prescriptive Compliance Method: Repairs, Existing Building Code (IEBC) that relates to this alterations, additions and changes of building; where required for definitions and basic occupancy comply with Chapter 3 of this code occupancy analysis, the 2006 International and the International Fire Code. The Building Code (IBC) is referenced. With few International Fire Code is not mandatory for exceptions, where an article does not apply to the alteration and repair of historic buildings this building type, size, configuration, etc., the when such buildings or structures do not article is not included herein. As with the constitute a distinct hazard to life or application of all codes, any questionable areas property." should be reviewed with local code officials or the (2) Work Area Compliance Method: Repairs, appropriate authority having jurisdiction. A alterations, additions and changes of specific application statement is made where occupancy comply with applicable provisions interpretation is required. of Chapter 4-12 of this code. This is the Construction Date: Constructed c.1954 recommended method for compliance for Building No. 6. (a) There are three alteration levels, Applicable Code: organized in increasing order of work 2006 International Existing Building Code performed on the building. Construction Type: Type IIA. (b) Code compliance factors for each alteration level include, by definition, the compliance factor of the preceding Occupancy Type: alteration level. For example, Alteration For this study, CTA was instructed to assume the building would potentially be used for offices. Level 3 compliance includes compliance with Level 1 and Level 2. Thus, the occupancy type would be of Business (c) The three levels of alteration are defined Group B. This group includes "the use of a building or structure, or a portion thereof, for in the summary li Chapter 4 below. office, professional or service-type transactions, (3) Performance Compliance Method: Repairs, including storage of records and accounts."10 alterations, additions and changes of occupancy comply with applicable provisions This occupancy constitutes a Change of of Chapter 13 of this code. Occupancy from the original dormitory use of The Work Area Compliance Method is typically Building No. 6. The new occupancy is more feasible for historic buildings, hence is considered one of low risk due to low fuel loads, recommended as the code-compliance approach limitation to daytime occupancy, and occupants for Building No. 6. Specific applications are that are aware of their surroundings. highlighted in the summary analysis on the Occupancy Load: 244 persons following pages. 102006 International Building Code, Section 304. " 2006 International Fire Code, Section 102.5, p. 1. Building No. 6 Code Review- 39 Boulder, Montana Chapter 2: Definitions Code Code Provision Code Application Reference 202 Occupancy: Application: Business use is considered a change in occupancy. 202 Historic Building: Application: Building No. 6 is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, as a contributing property to a potential Historic District. 403 Alteration Level 1: Level 1 alterations include the removal and replacement or the covering of existing materials, elements, equipment, or fixture using new materials, elements, equipment, or fixtures that serve the same purpose. Such alterations shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 6. Application: This level does not sufficiently describe the scope of work for Building No. 6. 404 Alteration Level 2: Level 2 alterations include the reconfiguration of space, the addition or elimination of any door or window, the reconfiguration or extension of any system, or the installation of any additional equipment. Application: This level applies to the current proposed scope of work for Building No. 6 405 Alteration Level 3: Level 3 alterations apply where the work area exceeds 50% of the aggregate area of the building. Application: This level is more extensive than required for the proposed renovation of Building No. 6. 406.2 Change or Occupancy: Change of occupancy shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 9. 408.1 Historic Buildings: Except as specifically provided for in Chapter 11, historic buildings shall comply with applicable provisions of this code for the type of work being performed. Compliance Chapter 6: Alterations— Level 1 (Work Area . . 602.1 Interior Finishes: All newly installed interior finishes shall comply with flame spread requirements of the IBC. 603.1 Fire Protection: Alterations shall be done in a manner that maintains the level of fire protection provided. Building No. 6 Code Review -40 Boulder, Montana Code Code Provisions Code Application Reference 604.1 Means of Egress: Repairs shall be done in a manner that maintains the level of protection provided for the means of egress. Application: Building No. 6's means of egress and exit access travel distances comply with the 2006 International Building Code (IBC). There are more than the required two exits and the maximum travel distance is less than the 200 feet code maximum (when there is no sprinkler system). 605.1 Accessibility: A building or element that is altered shall comply with the applicable provisions in Sections 605.1.1-605.1.12, Chapter 11 of IBC, and ICC Al 17.1, unless technically infeasible. 605.1.1 Entrances: Where an alteration includes alterations to an entrance, and the building has an accessible entrance on an accessible route, the altered entrance is not required to be accessible unless required by Section 605.2. Application: Building No. 6 has an accessible entrance. 605.1.4 Ramps: Where steeper slopes than allowed by Section 1010.2 of the IBC are necessitated by space limitations, the slope of ramps in or providing access to existing buildings shall comply with Table 605.1.4. Application: There is ample room to provide the required ramp slope outside Building No. 6; no exception required. 605.1.9 Toilet Rooms: Where it is technically infeasible to alter existing toilet facilities to be accessible, an accessible unisex toilet facility is permitted. The unisex facility shall be located on the same floor and in the same area as the existing facilities. Application: Renovations can accommodate toilet facilities for both sexes. 605.1.11 Thresholds: Maximum height of thresholds at doorways shall be %". Shall have beveled edges on each side. Application: The existing entry thresholds comply. Building No. 6 Code Review- 41 Boulder, Montana Code Code Provision Code Application Reference 606.2 Structural —Additional dead loads: Where addition or replacement of roofing or replacement of equipment results in additional dead loads of more than 5%, structural components supporting such reroofing or equipment shall comply with the vertical load requirements of the IBC. Application: It is not anticipated that any of the renovation recommendations would increase the roof load by more than 5%. 606.3 Structural — Roof diaphragm: Where roofing materials are removed from more than 50 percent of the roof diaphragm of a building or sections of a building where the roof diaphragm is a part of the main windforce- resisting system, the integrity of the roof diaphragm shall be evaluated and if found deficient because of insufficient or deteriorated connections, such connections shall be provided or replaced. Application: If the roofing is replaced, the diaphragm and connections should be evaluated and potentially replaced. 607.1 Energy Conservation: Level 1 alterations are permitted without requiring the entire building to comply with the energy requirements of the International Energy Conservation Code. They shall comply as they relate to new construction only. - I.M. 703.4 Interior Finish: The interior finish of walls and ceilings in exits and corridors in any work area shall comply with the requirements of the IBC. 704.2.2 Fire Protection: For specified Occupancy Groups automatic sprinkler protection is required when certain conditions are met. Business is not one of the specified Occupancy Groups. Application: An automatic sprinkler system is not required under this clause. 704.2.4 Other Required Suppression In buildings and areas listed in Table 903.2.13 of Systems: the IBC, certain work areas shall be required to be protected with automatic sprinkler system. Application: The only subject that could apply to the Business occupancy is Section 507, Unlimited area building. Building No. 6's area is below the maximum allowed, hence is not considered an unlimited area building. Building No. 6 Code Review -42 Boulder, Montana Code Code Provision Code Application Reference 705.1 Means of Egress: Requirements of Section 7 shall be limited to work areas that include exits or corridors shared by more than one tenant within the work area in which Level 2 alterations are being performed. Application: This clause applies, as there could be more than one tenant in the work area. Building No. 6 has more than the required number of exits. 705.4.1 Two Egress Doorways required: Work areas shall be provided with two egress doorways. In any work area, all rooms and spaces having an occupant load greater than 50 shall have a minimum of two egress doorways. Application: The dormitory rooms, which could have more than 50 occupants, all have two exits. 705.4.2 Door swing: In the work area and in the egress path from any work area to the exit discharge, all egress doors serving an occupant load greater than 50 shall swing in the direction of exit travel. Application: All exit doors swing in the direction of exit travel. 705.4.3 Door closing: In any work area, all doors opening onto an exit passageway at grade shall be self-closing or automatically closing by listed closing devices. Application: All such doors in Building No. 6 are currently equipped with door closers. 705.5 Openings in corridor walls: Corridor doors shall not be constructed of hollow core wood and shall not contain louvers. Doors shall have a fire-protection rating of at least 20 minutes. Application: 2006 IBC (Table 1017.1) also requires the doors in the one-hour rated corridor walls to be of 20-minute rating. The existing doors are solid wood core doors set in hollow metal frames, assumed to have 20-minute rating. This should be confirmed by examination of metal tags on hinge sides of the doors. 705.7 Means-of-egress lighting: Means-of-egress lighting shall be provided in accordance with the requirements of the IBC. Application: The new lighting system will have fixtures designated as emergency lighting. Building No. 6 Code Review-43 Boulder, Montana Code Code Provision Code Application Reference 705.8 Exit signs: Exit signs shall be provided in accordance with the requirements of the IBC. Application: Exit signs, with emergency lighting packs, will need to be installed at all exits. 707 Structural: Where alteration work includes installation of additional equipment that is structurally supported by the building such that portions of the building become subjected to higher gravity loads (5% greater than existing), then this section applies. Application: The addition of additional gravity loads is not anticipated. 708.1 Electrical—new installations: All newly installed electrical equipment and wiring relating to work done in any work area shall comply with the materials and methods requirements of Chapter 5. 708.2 Electrical - existing installations: Existing wiring in all work areas in Group A-1, A- 2, A-5, H, and I occupancies shall be upgraded to meet the materials and methods requirements of Chapter 5. Application: Building No. 6 is of Group B, yet the entire electrical system needs to be replaced and will be code compliant. 709 Mechanical: All reconfigured spaces intended for occupancy and all spaces converted to habitable or occupiable space in any work area shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation in accordance with the International Mechanical Code. Application: The entire mechanical system needs to be replaced and will be code compliant. 710 Plumbing: Where the occupant load is increased by more than 20%, plumbing fixtures shall be provided in quantities specified in the International Plumbing Code (IPC) based on the increased occupant load. Montana requires compliance with the 2006 Uniform Plumbing Code. Application: The occupant load of 244 occupants will be used to calculate the number of fixtures required for the restrooms. If a smaller actual occupancy load is determined — and posted — then the plumbing fixture counts shown on page 47 may be modified. Building No. 6 Code Review-44 Boulder, Montana 801 General: Level 3 alterations have been defined above as those where the work area exceeds 50% of the aggregate area of the building. Application: The proposed renovations at Building No. 6 will most likely not exceed 50% of the aggregate area of the building. Chapter 9: . • .f Occupancy 901 General: This chapter applies to buildings where a change of occupancy occurs Application: The occupancy type is being changed from dormitory (R-1), educational classroom (E-1 or E-2), and office spaces and cooking facilities (B-2) to the one use of Business (B). 907.1 Structural —Gravity Loads: Gravity loads: Buildings or portions thereof subject to a change of occupancy where such change in the nature of occupancy results in higher uniform or concentrated loads based on Tables 1607.1 and 1607.6 of IBC shall comply with the gravity load provisions of the IBC. Application: The loads of the B Occupancy remain the same as prior load categories. 907.2 Structural- Snow & Wind Loads: Buildings subject to a change of occupancy where such change results in higher wind or snow occupancy categories based on Table 1604.5 of IBC shall comply with the snow and wind load provisions of the IBC. Application: The building's original use was for Building Category II and will remain such. No additional provisions are required. 907.3' Structural—Seismic Loads: Buildings with occupancy changes that results in a reclassification to a higher hazard category as shown in Table 912.4 of IEBC shall comply with the seismic requirements of the IBC for the new seismic use group. Application: The change in occupancy for Building No. 6 reduces the relative hazard level from the prior use. No modifications required. 908 Electrical: Where the occupancy of an existing building is changed, electrical service and the number of electrical outlets shall be upgraded to meet the requirements of the /CC Electrical Code for the new occupancy. Application: Building No. 6 should be fitted with a new electrical system. Building No. 6 Code Review-45 Boulder, Montana Code Code Provision Code Application Reference 910 Plumbing: With change in occupancy, the new occupancy shall comply with the intent of the International Plumbing Code (IPC) provisions. Montana requires compliance with the 2006 Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC). Application: The UPC will apply to the renovation of Building No. 6. 912.4 Means of Egress: When change of occupancy classification is made to a higher hazard category, the means of egress shall comply with Chapter 10 of IBC. Application: The change in occupancy for Building No. 6 results in a lesser hazard category, hence this provision does not apply. 912.6 Exterior wall fire-resistance ratings: Exterior wall fire resistance rating is required to comply with higher exterior wall rating of Table 912.6. Application: Building No. 6's new occupancy has the same relative hazard level for exterior wall exposure as did the prior occupancy. 912.8 Accessibility: Existing buildings undergoing a change in occupancy shall have all of the following accessible features: 1. At least one accessible entrance. 2. At least one accessible route from an accessible building entrance to primary function areas. 3. Signage complying IBC Section 1110. 4. Accessible parking, where parking is provided. 5. At least one accessible passenger loading zone, where loading zones are provided. 6. At least one accessible route connecting accessible parking and accessible passenger loading zones to an accessible entrance. Application: All of the above are easily achievable. Items 1 and 2 have already been provided. Building No. 6 Code Review -46 Boulder, Montana distributed throughout the building. It is Summary of Revisions Required by Code recommended that the existing shower rooms be retained for this purpose, and to include reuse of The following revisions summarize the findings the private shower stalls to encourage employee noted in the Applications of the code sections fitness. Removal of these shower rooms would above: add unnecessary expense to the project, especially when they can be reused. 1. All newly installed interior finishes shall comply with flame spread requirements of the IBC. 2. An automatic fire protection system is not required by code, due to the low risk nature of the proposed occupancy, the low-rise of the building, and the ample number of exits. 3. All newly installed electrical equipment and wiring shall comply with the materials and methods requirements of Chapter 5. 4. Provide new electrical system, lighting, egress lighting, and exit signs. 5. Insert code and ADA-compliant restrooms. E 6. Provide new mechanical system. i } 7. Incorporate energy efficiencies in the new Figure 71: Convert shared toilet room into single work. accessible toilet room. All of the work proposed on the building should be reviewed with local code officials and the Fire Marshal, When Building No. 7 was remodeled, retention of the kitchen was allowed by the Fire Marshal, provided that meals would be cooked without producing grease. This allowed for relaxation of requirement for fire suppression hood (this should also obviate the need to add a grease trap).12 Retention of the kitchen and cafeteria are recommended, for use as an employee snack area and for catering of small conferences. The 2006 Uniform Plumbing Code requires the following number of fixtures: Water Closets: 2 Men, 8 Female Urinals: 2 Lavatories: 1 Men, 1 Female Drinking Fountains: 2 The above counts can easily be achieved by remodeling of the existing facilities, which are well 72 Richard Levandowski, Deputy State Fire Marshal, letter to Mark S. Delaney of the Aspen Youth Alternative, March 4, 1999. See letter in the Appendix. Building No. 6 Code Review- 47 Boulder, Montana Blank Back Page Building No. 6 Code Review-48 Boulder, Montana 14. Windows: Replace sealant at masonry • • • openings. 15. Windows: Lubricate hardware. 16. Windows: Install sealant at joint between Recommendations for Scope of Work steel stools and plaster. The following scopes of work represent the 17. Windows: Install sun-shades at interior recommendations made throughout the south- and west-facing windows.. evaluation for Building No. 6, with comments 18. Windows: Provide exterior aluminum added for clarification of intent of use. It includes storm windows. work required to bring the building exterior and 19. Windows: Replace sealant/gaskets at interior to usable conditions and to provide for primary sash. fully functioning offices. The work shown below is 20. Roofing: Repair three roof drains. not prioritized, and is listed in the order in which it 21. Concrete flooring: Remove all vinyl tile, appears in the report. adhesive, and base. Shotblast the concrete, apply epoxy-based moisture 1. Site: Replace exterior handrails at entry control system, and self-leveling ramps and four dormitory exit ramps. compound. Sawcut for new plumbing Provide handrails at kitchen steps and two lines. west stair runs. 22. Vinyl tile flooring: Provide new vinyl tile 2. Site: Provide striped ADA parking space, flooring and rubber base throughout with post sign. (except at terrazzo floors). 3. Signage: Provide tactile signs to identify 23. Plaster walls: Remove damaged plaster entries and exits. and efflorescence salts. Provide 4. Concrete base: Remove loose and replacement plaster. Paint throughout. spalling concrete; patch the concrete. 24. Ceilings: Remove damaged plaster Treat exposed reinforcing. ceilings, replacing with new. Remove 5. Concrete base: Apply clear penetrating existing water-saturated acoustic tile in sealant to exterior exposed faces. northeast dormitory. 6. Brick walls: Repoint open mortar joints 25. Doors - Interior: Provide new locksets estimated at 10% of joints). with accessible levers. 7. Brick rowlock sills: Repoint all mortar 26. Trim: Prepare and repaint wood base in joints. northwest classroom. 8. Brick rowlock sills: Replace rowlock brick 27. Insulation: Install insulation above ceilings. at the two north openings, and the one 28. HVAC: Replace heating system. east opening, where the brick have been 29. Plumbing: Provide new domestic water cut. Integrate flashing into this new and drain-waste-vent piping. Sawcut in construction. new sewer lines, connecting to the new 9. Lintels: Replace sealant; prepare and campus sewer system. Extend gas repaint steel lintels. Repoint minor brick service to the building to serve domestic cracks and replace damaged brick water heater. Provide new domestic (minimal) at bearing ends of lintels. water service. 10. Front entry doors - Exterior: Replace 30. Drinking fountains: Provide two high-low delaminated veneers and Plexiglas (with drinking fountains. laminated safety glass). 31. Electrical: Replace service system 11. Doors - Exterior: Refinish all doors, equipment, distribution equipment, and sidelites, transoms, and frames. wiring. 12. Doors - Exterior: Replace kitchen entry 32. Electrical Lighting: Replace lighting door. fixtures throughout. Provide fixtures to be 13. Doors - Exterior: Replace latching designated as emergency lighting. hardware with accessible hardware. Replace exit signs. 33. Kitchen: Remodel for catering use and general employee use. Building No. 6 Scope of Work & Estimate -49 Boulder, Montana 34. Restrooms: Reuse and renovate the existing restrooms in the shower rooms to provide the code-required fixture counts. Renovate the three private shower stalls. Construction Cost Estimate The following construction cost estimate has been calculated in 2010 dollars. A cost escalation of 3-5% should be added for each year that passes before the work is performed. The estimates include typical design and construction industry standards, general conditions, and contractor's overhead and profit. Professional design fees of 12% of construction costs are included as a placeholder for budgeting purposes. The estimate is organized in the same order as the Scope of Work. The estimate is based upon information provided by the material suppliers, RS Means 2010 Building Construction Cost Data, unit costs for the required work, and quantity take-offs of the components contained in the scope of work. The estimates do not include furnishings, fixtures, and equipment. Construction costs are always subject to current bidding conditions, availability of qualified contractors, and material costs, hence estimates are not guaranteed amounts. CTA recommends that competitive bidding be implemented in order to achieve the most reasonable pricing for the project. Building No. 6 Scope of Work & Estimate - 50 Boulder, Montana Building No.6 Constr.Cost Estimate April 19,2010 Item Extension Total Sitework: Replace exterior handrails $17,200.00 Provide striped ADA parking space with post sign $1,500.00 Provide tactile signs to identify entries&exits $1 50.00 $20,200:00 Building Exterior: Cocnrete base:repave loose,treat,and patch $1,000.00 Concrete base-apply clear penetrating sealant $7,900.00 Brick walls-repaint 10°b $9,010.00 Brick walls -replace rowlocks $1,320.00 Repoint brick rowlock sills not being rebuilt $4,112.00 Lintels: Replace sealant; prepare and repaint $3,000.00 Lintels:Repaint minor brick cracking at ends. $120.00 Lintels: Replace damaged brick at ends. $450.00 Doors-Replace deism veneers;install lam.Glass $2,000.00 Doors-Refinish all doors,sidektes,transoms. $6,000.00 Doors-Replace kitchen door $8o0oo Doors-Replace latching hardware $2,400.00 Wndows- Replace seatnt at masonry openings $3,900.00 WWndows-Replace sealnt at masonry openings $1,600.00 M/ndows-Lubricate hardware $4,000.00 Windows-Install interior sunshades $3,900,00 Windows-Provide aluminum storms $62,500.00 Roofing- Repair three roof drains $3,000.00 $117,002.00 Building Interior: Concrete flooring- Remove vinyl and adhesive $25,000.00 Concrete floor-Shotblast,apply epoxy MC $9,500.00 Concrete floor-Self leveling $18.750.00 Sawcutting and patching for plumbing $3,000.00 Vinyl file flooring-Install where removed $34,000.00 Piaster walls-Remove damaged, repair $2,500.00 Ceilings-Remove damaged,.repair $3,00000 Doors-Provide new locksets with accessible Nis $15,750.00 Trim-Prepare and repaint base in NW classroom $1,12000 Insulation-Install above ceilings $36,600A0 HVAC -Replace heating system $244,000.00 Plumbing-Replace plumbing system $146,400A0 Drinking fountains-Provide two $4,400.00 Electrical-Replace electrical system $366,000.00 Install fire alarm system $61.000.00 Kitchen-Minor remodeling $20000.00 Restrooms-Reconfigure $80,000.00 Painting-Throughout $25,000.00 $1,096,020.00 Sub-Total $1,233,222.-00 Estimating Design Contingency 15% $184,963.30 Genera[Conditions at 6% $113;458,42 Overheard&Profit at 12% $183,799.41 Construction Contingency @ 10% $171,54611 Total Construction Estimate $1,887,007.2$ Design Fees 12%of Construction Cost $226,"0,87 Total Construction and Design 32,113,448.11 Building No. 6 Scope of Work & Estimate - 51 Boulder, Montana Blank Back Page Building No. 6 Scope of Work& Estimate- 52 Boulder, Montana APPENDIX Test Results Lead-Based Paint Testing Asbestos-Containing Materials Testing Prior Documentation March 4, 1999 Letter from Law Enforcement Services Division ARDEX Project Case Studies Union County Board of Education West Anaheim Medical Center Building No. 6 Appendix- 53 Boulder, Montana EMSL Analytical, Inc. 3 Cooper St., Westmont, NJ 08108 Phone: (856)858-4800 Fax: (M3)852-9551 Email: we in ntleadl btunemsl com Arn: Lesley Gilmore Customer ID: CTAA2IA CTA, Inc. Customer PO: 1143 Stoneridge Drive Received: 011211109:22 AM Bozemen, MT 59718 EMSL Order: 201000919 Fax: (406)585-3031 Phone: (406)556-7100 EMSL Proj: Project: Boulder Bldg 6,Boulder,MT Test Report: Lead in Paint Chips by Flame AAS (SW 846 3050B*/7000B) Lead Client Sample Description Lab ID Collected Analyzed Concemrntion 1 0001 1/27/2010 0.011 %Wt Interior paint sample(on plaster) Shannon Kauffman,Lead Lab Supervisor or other approved signatory Repotirg limit is got%wl.The Do data associated with these sample resets ecludsd in this mKit meet the..Umd Quality control requirements,unless specifically indicated otherwise.Unless mled,resulb in this report are not blank wnected. This repod misuse only to the samples reported aboea and may not be reproduced.meept In full,without written approval by EMSL.EMSL bears no responsibility for sample collectun aaietes. slight modifications to methods applied Samples received in good condition unless otherwise noted.Quality Control Data associated with the sample set is within acceptable limits. unless otherwise noted Samples analyzed by EMSL Analytical,Inc.3 Cooper SL, W estomMNJ NJ-NEIAP:Nast, AM AP,LLC.ELLAP Accreditation 100194 Test Report ChmSnglePrm/nQC-7.12.0 Printed:1127/2010 5:02:46 PM Page 1 of 1 EMSL Analytical, Inc. 107 Haddon Ave.,Westmont, NJ 08108 Phone: (856)8584800 Fax: (856)855-4960 Email: weslrnontashlabh, IVISL Attn Lesley Gilmore Customer ID: CTAA21A CTA, Inc. Customer PO: 1143 Stoneridge Drive Received: 011211109:15 AM Bozemen, MT 59718 EMSL Order: 041001255 Fax: (406)585-3031 Phone: (406)55&7100 EMSL Proj: Project: BOULDER BLDG 6 BOULDER MT Analysis Date: 112712 0 1 0 Test Report: Asbestos Analysis of Bulk Materials via EPA 600/R-931116 Method using Polarized Light Microscopy Non-Asbestos Asbestos Sample Description Appearance % Fibrous % Non-Fibrous % Type 1-Skim Coat White 100% Non-fibrous(other) None Detected 041001255 0a1 Non-Fibrous Heterogeneous i-Rough Coat Brown 2% Hair 98% Non-fibrous(other) None Detected 0410012Ms Xla Fibrous Heterogeneous Analyst(s) 1 'E�;_44 Melissa KInedilsf(2) Stephen Siegel,CIH,Laboratory Manager a other approved signatory Due to magnification limitations inherent in FILM,asbestos fibers in dimensions below the resolution capability,of PLM may not be detected.The limit of detection as stated in the method is 1%. The abase test repod relates only to the items hated and may not be reproduced in any form without the express written Optional of EMSL Analytical,Inc. EMSL'. liability is limited to the cast of analysis. EMSL bears no responsibility for sample collection ac oties or analytical method limitations. Interpretadon and use of test resulm are the respansibilltynLMeclierd. Samples recovedin goodcondition unless oNeiwise noted. This report must not be used to claim product endomement by NVLAP or any agency of the U.S.Gowmment. The test results meet all NELAC requirements unless otherwise specified. Samples aneyoad by EMSL Anal 'cal,Inc.107 Haddcn Aye., WestmontNJ AIHA-LAP.LLCAHLAP Lab 100191,NVLAP Lab Code 101048-0,NYS ELAP 10872,NJ DEP 04006 Test Report PLM-7.12.0 Printed:1127/20106:29:31 PM THIS IS THE LAST PAGE OF THE REPORT. 1 EMSL Analytical, Inc. 107 Haddon Ave., Westmont, NJ 08108 w�.o. t =°;r �'�x ra s fi;r _dl°antaatriak�a.EMSL,G9�! Alln Lesley Gilmore Customer ID: CTAA2IA CTA, Inc. Customer PO: 1143 Stoneridge Drive Received: 10/08/099:00 AM Bozemen, MT 59718 EMSL Order: 040924933 Fax: (406)585-3031 Phone: (406)556-7100 EMSL Proj: Project: BOULDER BLDG.6 Analysis Date: 10/12/2009 BOULDER,MT Test Report: Asbestos Analysis of Bulk Materials via EPA 600/R-93/116 Method using Polarized Light Microscopy Non-Asbestos Asbestos Sample Description Appearance % Fibrous % Non-Fibrous % Type 1 VtNYL TILE Yellow 90% Non-fibrous(other) 10% Chrysotile 0409149334IW1 FLOORING Fibrous Heterogeneous 1 ADHESIVE Black 95% Non-fibrous(other) 5% Chrysotile 04092493341WIA Non-Fibrous Heterogeneous Analyst(s) - , J Aka Ganes(2) Stephen Siegel,CH,Laboratory Manager or other approved signatory Due b magnification limitations inherent in PLM,asbastosllbers in dimensions below the resolution capabilityaf PLM may rot be detected.The limit ofdetection asstatedinthe methodisl%. Theabove test won relates onlyto the items lasted and may notba reproduced in anyf000 wbhout theaspress written spcmwl d EMSL Analytical,Inc. EMSL's habirn yislimitadt.w.coatdanaysis. EMSL bears no responsibility,for sample collection achites or analytical method limitations. Interpretation and use&test results are the responsibility ofthe client. Samples received in good condition unless dherwise noted This report must not he used to claim product endorsement by NVLAP or any agencye Ne U.S.Sowmmed. The test results meet all NELAC w itiremeda unless otherwise specified. Samples analycedi by EMSL Analytical,Inc Westmont 107 Haddon Aw.,Westmont W AIHA MLAP 100194,NVL P Lab Code 101005-0,N VS 110872,W DEP WDS Test Report PLM-7.12.0 Printed:10112/20098:40:57 AM THIS IS THE LAST PAGE OF THE REPORT. 1 LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICrS DIVISION DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE STATE OF MONTANA 1310 East Lackey PO Box 201415 a Helena,MT 590-0-1415 Joseph P. Mazurek FA,'f: (406)444-9155 Attorney General ` +K Ad.inutmfiom March 4, 1999 4�Q6)to=}g7'.1 MR. MARK S DELANEY CIO ASPEN YOUTH ALTERNATIVE P O BOX 1088 BOULDER MT 59632 Crimia:xl [a�e,t;yatkM Dear Mr. Delaney: lanai.;aa.ae#s SUBJECT: FIRE SAFETY INSPECTION-VACANT BUILDINGS#7 AND #8 The Fire Prevention and Investigation Program of the Department of Justice is the agency responsible for fire and life safety inspections in the State of Montana. As you are aware;on rnedttsn February 24, 1999,. an inspection of the above referenced vacant buildings was performed by and Deputy State Fire Marshal Rich Levandowski. Also inspecting the buildings was Mr.Tim Lloyd abt ,U a nn and Mr.Bernie Fisher of the Montana State Building Codes Bureau. The inspection was at your tie6)44".3650 request and was for the purpose of determining if these old abandoned buildings could be modified and reused for future programs of Aspen Youth Alternatives. As a result of this inspection please see my following comments. Idenli&orlon The Building official is responsible for determining the occupancy classification of these . ➢urtou Heat++"aszs buildings.As a result of past inspection responsibility,when the facilities were being operated as the Montana Developmental Center,I am aware that the two buildings in question were inspected based upon the following. Building -This building,to my knowledge,was classified as a"mixed occupancy';i.e.,the v�ezntw building included dormitories(R-I occupancy),Educational Classrooms (E-1 or 2 occupancy), Invmfigailan gu".u Office spaces,Cooking facilities and a Swimming Pact(B-2 occupancies). As such,it is my urru ,.mer+ 3975 understanding that the specific construction and equipment requirements within the structure were based primarily on the most restrictive requirements found within these different classifications. As a result of the information you provided during this inspection it is my understanding that the basic"use" of this building,as proposed by Aspen Youth Alternatives,will not change from its' original use classificat on.(mixed occupancy). It is also my understanding that it is Aspen Youth's intent to remove the swimming pool from the structure;to continue to use those rooms designated as dormitories,as dormitories;to use those rooms previously classified as classrooms,as classrooms, to use those moms previously designated offices,as offices;and;to continue use of the dining room for dining.The kitchen would continua to be used,however, cooking which would"produce grease-laden vapors"would not be performed because the cooking of meals will take place at a different location.This kitchen would simply be used for making sandwiches and possibly heating some soup.This is important because if commercial cooking(which produced grease laden vapors)were to take place then a hood, complying with the Uniform Mechanical Code,and a hood fire suppression system complying with both the Unfonn Fire Code and the Mechanical Code would have to be installed. If it is the intent of Aspen Youth Alternatives not to use thetuilding for purposes other than those you described,the Uniform Fire Code would require you to address,upgrade and restore to proper operation the following systems in the buildings. 1. The existing fire alarm system would have to be upgraded and placed back into operation. (Including magnetic door holders). 2. All exit lights and emergency lighting units would have to be upgraded and put back into proper operation. 3. All clectrcal switch covers,receptacle covers,etc. would have to be properly reinstalled. (It was observed that many of these cover plates are either broken or completely mussing). 4. All exit doors would have to be checked to verify proper operation during an emergency condition. Doors and/or hardware found to be defective would have to be repaired or replaced. S. The existing standpipe system will have to be upgraded and placed back in proper operation. Lastly,as a suggestion,I would strongly recommend the existing rooms previously designated as dormitories continue to be used as donnitories. These rooms are presently provided with direct exits to the exterior of the building in the event of afire emergency.I would have some serious concerns about using interior rooms for dormitories due to the lack of direct exterior exiting capabilities. Buildine#S -This building, as I understand, is proposed to be used for educational purposes and office space. In similar fashion to Building#7 I don't believe the proposed"use"will dramatically change from the buildings original"use". As a result,I don't believe the Uniform Fire Code requires any special upgrade requirements of the building, other than that which may be required by the Building Codes Bureau. My concern;as with Building 07,is the upgrade and restoration of the existing systems. L The existing fire alarm system would have to be upgraded and placed back into operation. (Including magnetic door holders). 2. All exit lights and emergency lighting units would have to be upgraded and put back into proper operation. 1 All electrical switch covers, receptacle covers, etc. would have to be properly reinstalled. at was observed that many of these cover plates are either broken or completely missing). 4: All exit doors would have to be checked to verify proper operation during an emergency condition.Doors and/or hardware found to be defective would have to be repaired or replaced. If you have any questions or comments regarding the results of this inspection please feel free to call me at(406)444-2050. Sine y, Richard Levandowski,Deputy State Fire Marshal Certified Uniform Fire Code Inspector#68262 c: Tim Lloyd,Chief, State Building Codes B,-=au , Muir Case St udy ;. 0 7 udafl (r,7@mRT � a New Jersey •FLOOR COVERING INSTALLATION SYSTEMS SEX P'-' L • ARDEX MCm MOISTURE CONTROL SYSTEM ARDEX FEATHERFINISHx ENui • High moisture readings1'rF • 50 year old building 5' ,PROPLEM ,the Union County Board of Education offices that are housed in a 50 year old building, required, ; e renovation of 1 6H}sg.ft. of floor space.The moisture readings from the concrete slab Were }{"` - elFaboyG a aFceptalrle limd to receive the specified VCT Flooring. yA , k Arcnnee, ert Potter cared John Caemmerer,ARDEX Sales Professional to the lobsite for a consult.Thecirrent contractor that was hired to install the VCT flooring was not certified to instat' ARDEX MC "'Moisture Control System, so John called in Floor Covering Installation Systems ` recently certified ARDEX MC Installer. Floor Covering Installation Systems installed the ARDFX MC Moisture Control System,a two-part epoxy system that reduces moisture in concrete from up to 20 lbs.down to 31'bs.overnight. They also finished tie floor with ARDEX FEATHER FINISH'before the original contractor came back in to install the new VCT Flooring. x As a result,ARDEX expertise and high performance products got the lob done owtime and on budget.Tne priglnal contractor was so impressed with the ARDEX MC installation hey:have' ' requested At2DEX MC Certification Training for their firm. X ors y lis° akb d T & h A ARDEX Engineered Cements • 400 Ardex Park Drive •Aliquippa, PA 15001 „,.., _ YOUR BEST CHOICE FOR 888-512-7339 •ww"w.ardex.com u L INSTALLATION ARDEX Project Case Study r� Anaheim, CA IIJRVVY, u I ILJI GENERAL CONTRACTOR SIGNATURE INTERIORS INC. INSTALLER • NEW VISIONS • WALLACH'S COMMERCIAL FLOORING & DESIGN PRODUCTS • ARDEX MCI' MOISTURE CONTROL SYSTEM • ARDEX K 15® SELF-LEVELING UNDERLAYMENT CONCRETE • HENRY® 430 ClearPrOTM CLEAR VCT ADHESIVE CHALLENGE • 10,000 sq. ft. of floors with high moisture readings in the hospital ICU unit To be completed in two phases—Phase 1; 4,000 sq. ft to only 4 days and Phase 2; 6,000 sq. ft. • Each day the ICU is down equates to significant lost revenues. Project has a fast-track schedule to minimize down time. PROBLEM West Anaheim Medical Center needed to replace the VCT flooring in its busy Intensive Care Unit(ICU).;r. Signature Interiors was awarded the project as the general contractor.After testing for moisture and getting higher than acceptable readings for a VCT installation, John French of Signature turned to Jeff G Masan,ARDEX Regional Sales Manager for assistance on the project and for a recommendation on an installer for the ARDEX MCTM Moisture Control'System,ARDEX K 15®Self leveling Underlayment Concrete and the VCT flooring. The very busy ICU needed a fast-track solution to minimize down time and loss of revenues. Revenue lost could be as high as $40,000 a day when the unit is not operational. Phase 1 needed to be completed in,' just four days. SOLUTION Jeff Mason introduced John French of Signature to Jose Orozco of New Visions, a certified ARDEX MC Moisture Control System installer. New visions handled the entire ARDEX MC installation for both Phase 1 and 2.Wallach's Commercial Flooring was brought in for the ARDEX K 15 and VCT Flooring installation. Wallach's also used HENRY 430 ClearPr0 Clear VCT Adhesive to install the VCT flooring qualifying it as i an ARDEX/HENRY SystemOneTM installation . ; New Visions and Wallach's completed the entire installation of Phase 1 in 4 days, on schedule and on-budget. The hospital was impressed with the beautiful floor and the fast-track performance of the r ARDEX and HENRY products in the turn key installation. Phase 2 was also installed on-time and on budget. Because of the great success and performance of these installations, ARDEX products are being specified for other projects in the West Anaheim Medical Center. The ARDEX/HENRY SystemOne Solution Installation is backed by an industry best 10-Year comprehensive,full-replacement warranty. ARDEX Engineered Cements •400 Ardex Park Drive •Aliquippa, PA 15001 -OU��` ST FdR 888-512-7339•www.ardex.com .INST TIC ESS" Attachment C Letter of Commitment - JLDC JEFPERSUN LOCAL GaEdELOPa T C* PORATION October 1, 2015 �^ JLDC Ms. Meg O'Leary, Director Montana Department of Commerce PO Box 200525 Helena MT 59620 Dear Director O'Leary, I am writing to express our organization's commitment for the proposed Preliminary Architectural Report of Building 6 on the Boulder South Campus. Jefferson Local Development Corporation works to expand jobs and tax base in Jefferson County. We manage the former south campus of the Montana Developmental Center in Boulder and have redeveloped two of the buildings which now house one of Boulder's major employers, Youth Dynamics Incorporated. A Preliminary Architectural Report of Building 6 will give us a design and cost estimate for renovating this building which is needed in order to proceed with the renovation of this building for our primary tenant ofthe JLDC Is the lead 9q omic South.Campus,Youth Dynamics Incorporated. When the renovation is development organization complete, Youth Dynamics will be able to expand their services to include for Jefferson County, treatment for substance abuse and they will expand their workforce by 25 providing Information, employees. finance solutions and educational programs for Our organization hereby commits$5,000 in matching.fiords necessary to businesses and complete the Preliminary Architectural Report, community members. Sine of Hrlrri Manager 309 East Legion Avenue P.O.Box 1079 Whitehall,MT 59759 Tel 406.287.3282 Fax 406.287.3287 Email madisonjeffersanl@montana.edu tmastel @montana.edu harrington@montam.edu Web http:1,V a jldcmt.comi Attachment D Letters of Support �s Jefferson County Commission 118 W. Centennial Post Office Box H Boulder, Montana 59632-0249 (406)225-4025 Voice/(406)225-4148 Fax Bob Mullen, Chair Leonard Wortman, Commissioner Cory Kirsch, Commissioner RSON COIN September 29,2015 Ms. Meg O'Leary, Director Montana Department of Commerce PO Box 200525 Helena, MT 59620 Dear Director O'Leary: The Jefferson County Commission fully supports the application to CDBG for funding to conduct a Preliminary Architectural Report on Building Six of the South Campus. This report is the first step toward the renovation of this building that will enable Youth Dynamics to expand their operation to hire 25 additional employees. As you know,with the impending closure of the Montana Developmental Center, Boulder is in need of assistance with its economy. We believe that this project will help us retain and expand one of Boulder's remaining large employers. Youth Dynamics has the potential to add additional services that would allow them to hire an additional 25 employees. Building Six would give them the space they need to add the new services. Having Building Six renovated will turn this blighted building back into the asset it once was. Please consider approving this application. We thank you for your support. Sincerely, Bob Mullen, Chair Leonard Wortman Cory Kirsch Jefferson County Board of Commissioners COM/ha cc: reading file CITY OF BOULDER September 24, 2015 Ms. Meg O'Leary, Director Montana Department of Commerce PO Box 200525 Helena MT 59620 RE: Letter of Support for Jefferson County and JLDC Dear Ms. O'Leary, On behalf of the City of Boulder, I am pleased to submit this letter of support for the Planning Grant application submitted by Jefferson County to Montana Department of Commerce. Jefferson County is submitting an application on behalf of Jefferson Local Development Corporation(JLDC)requesting funds to finance the preparation of a Preliminary Architectural Report(PAR). The PAR is associated with Building#6 on the South Campus in Boulder. I understand that Youth Dynamics currently leases two buildings on the South Campus which JLDC manages. Youth Dynamics wants to expand their operation to include treatment for youth with substance abuse issues which is a great need and currently not available in Montana. Youth Dynamics would like to remodel the larger Building 6 building to include treatment areas and dorm rooms. They would move their operation from the second building they currently occupy into Building #6, which is 24,000 square feet. They would serve more kids and add an additional 25 full-time positions. This project has the potential to satisfy community goals of creating jobs as well as fulfilling our civic responsibilities of eliminating blight. The fact that the project is located in Boulder is significant because the legislature recently voted to close that town's largest employer, Montana Developmental Center. Capital improvements are critical to the continued economic viability of Jefferson County. These improvements will keep the state and local economy strong and enhance our quality of life in Park County. If you have questions about the City of Boulder's support of the proposed project, please contact the office 406-225-3381. Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely, , Gary Craft Mayor 304 North Main Street (406)225-3381 phone P.O.Box 68 (406)225-9498 FAX Boulder,Montana 59632 u Ms. Meg O'Leary, Director Montana Department of Commerce PO Box 200525 Helena MT 59620 Youth Dynamics is a nonprofit human service organization with a central office in Billings Montana. We currently employ 55 people at our facility in Boulder where we operate therapeutic group homes and a therapeutic day school for troubled youth. With the renovation of Building 6 of the Boulder South Campus, we expect to be able to expand our services to offer therapeutic treatment for youth with substance abuse issues in this setting, a much needed addition to the Montana service system. We anticipate that we will increase the number of youth we serve from 32 to 48 as this new program meets a growing need in the State of Montana. Nearly all of the youth we serve are low-income and qualify for Medicaid. With the expansion, we anticipate hiring an additional 25 FTE within two years of opening the facility. Without the renovation of Building 6, we will be unable to expand our current operations because of space constraints at our current location on the Boulder South Campus. Thank you for your consideration of the grant application for the preliminary architectural report for Building six. Sincerely, rye. Peter Degel, PhD Chief Executive Officer Youth Dynamics 2334 Lewis Ave. Billings, MT 59102•(406)245-6539 FAX:(406)245-3192 September 30. 2015 Ms. Meg O'Leary, Director Montana Department of Commerce PO Box 200525 Helena MT 59620 Dear Director O'Leary, The Boulder Area Chamber of Commerce gives its full support to Jefferson County's CDBG planning grant application for a Preliminary Architectural Report on Building Six of the South Campus. The Chamber is concerned about the loss of the jobs at the Montana Developmental Center. We fully support the expansion of the Youth Dynamics organization because it has the potential to add 25 new full time jobs to the community. In addition to the jobs, renovating building six will help make the community more attractive to potential new residents or business interests. Thank you for considering Jefferson County's application. Sincerely, jo Sarah Layng President Boulder Area Chamber of Commerce (406)465-2106 email: www.bouldermtehamber.org